279

But something I need to do. But what? Provide your feedback in a "constructive way", and be done about it. Not your place to make decisions. Mention something along the lines of "It was good to get a chance to evaluate the product X. As I see it: - Pros: 1, 2, 3 - Cons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ...... As it is evident from the analysis ...


146

As long as you kept your feedback limited to the things she did, what the effect of those things were and what she could do to get a better outcome I don't see how anything you have said could be construed as being related in any way to her gender. She has tried to make it about gender, not you because she has taken it personally and to be fair as you are ...


116

While the other answers are good, you have mentioned something new and relevant in a comment, which might be causing the specific behaviour from your teammates in your case. You said: I'm also the most senior dev in the team That could be important here. In that case, I can easily imagine that you are treated with extra deference / respect, and a mixture ...


47

The short answer is: No It's the job of the person executing the merge to ensure that the process has been followed. You did your job, now they have to do theirs. You could follow up with them and ask why there are no comments or feedback on your pull requests if you feel there should be. This is a cultural question - how does your office work normally? ...


31

Try starting here: given that he often presents his - completely false - solutions to me and other people at the same time Limit number of presentations. Have an agreement that you must always approve this person's presentations before they are released in public. Suggest that to your and person's managers as well. This will allow you to give initial ...


29

Rule of Thumb: Don't burn the bridge while you're leaving. While your intentions are good (you're trying to provide honest feedback), it can easily be misinterpreted, more so since you're expressing those just before you're leaving (exit interview, etc.). You won't be available for a dicussion and to defend your decision / opinion. Keep it simple: Mention ...


27

I responded to your post but I'll go ahead and answer: I felt like I owed this colleague to share the feedback that I was seeing a pattern that could be detrimental to their career and shared it, specifically pointing at instances and offering suggestions. This, generally speaking, is not as helpful as people imagine it to be. Unsolicited criticism is ...


27

I'm sorry, but your boss is a jerk. It is valid to provide feedback on "soft" skills. However, it needs to be actionable like: "You tend to interrupt your peers in meetings. I need you to make sure you wait for people to finish their thought before jumping in." or "Your emails to clients are too technical for them to understand. Can you start just giving ...


26

Adding an answer because the other answers dance around it but never really call out specifically in the shortest phrasing possible: You need a "definition of done" Generally accepted definitions of done include not only working code, but working unit tests, and documentation. Until those things are completed, the task is not done and the code cannot and ...


24

To me, you did good. You had some people complain, and being a senior, you thought to give advice to your junior colleague about it. She did not see it as such. There are many reasons why that would be the case, from defense mechanism, her own bias, etc. The question is what to do from now on, and my advice there would be: do nothing more on that topic. ...


18

(Good) management is influenced by logic, not name-calling. Reading your OP, you have mentioned that you think this software is crap, but you didn't say how or why. If I was a manager and I read your OP, I would think you were just a troublemaker, and you would lose face with me. If this is how you wrote the email to management, then it's a good thing you ...


16

No, it would not be professional to include this in your presentation. Most internship presentations are meant to be a summary of your work and the things you've accomplished over the term. It's usually more of a benefit to you than the company, to help you develop technical communication and presentation skills. Including criticism of your experience in ...


15

But something I need to do. But what? First thing constructive to do is to check your motivations carefully, why do you need to do something? Why do you want to engage in a dispute that you think you will lose. If you're asked to analyse a tool, do so, give the pro's and cons without bias. Don't create problems without complete analysis or reason.


14

Keep you resignation letter short and to the point. Make it nice and grateful but there is no need to put any reason in there at all. If no one asks why, you are done. If your boss ask, I see no reason not to be open honest about it. Make it constructive and about you. Example "incompatible management style" "the way projects are run is not a good cultural ...


13

Do NOT turn back positive feedback. Just deal with it. Seriously, it's very, very bad to turn it down. This is mostly from experience, but the idea of working is that someone pays you for your work and that they trust you to complete the work done. When you show a lack of confidence, it affects how people perceive you and your work. Generally it's seen as ...


13

What more can I do to give feedback to someone and completely avoid giving the false impression that my feedback comes from prejudice? You can't. By definition: If you have (unconscious) prejudice, you won't be conscious of it. And she may see it. So it's not a false impression. You (we all) need more humility. Accept you may have prejudice without ...


12

Why not write pretty much what you have written in the question? You seem to be pretty respectful, and to indicate that you don't take the comments the wrong way. If the tool doesn't support free-format text, write him an email saying it is prompted by the tool, but you don't know how to fit it into the tool.


12

If they are anonymous, I want to write about office politics, incompetent manager, several malpractices in the office. Also, what are the best ways to write these so that the company will not be able to find out the person who wrote this particular feedback. (Having limited number of employees, someone might be able to trace out the person who ...


11

The answer to these questions typically is "how would this action improve your career" and that "there is little to nothing to be gained from such an action". In this case I cannot see how you would ever benefit. In best case the company changes its interview policies or personnel, but again how does this help you if you are "not wanting a change of their ...


11

Don't think that a feedback always have to be negative, it can (and should) contain positive sides also. The general rule for any feedback: Start with a positive note. Bring up the negatives, and suggest ways to overcome it. End on a positive note. Depending on the situation, you can: Surely list down the positive sides (and how those tings helped you ...


10

Consider approaching the original feedback conversation from a stance of humbleness and seeking to understand. ...a colleague was pushing people so strongly to work on a project that it caused a few of those people and their managers to come to me and either complain outright about it or just express confusion about it, because they hadn't heard ...


10

Rewrite the letter you were going to send your boss. Don't assume bad intentions from your coworker. Be polite. Be specific. Drop the word "crap". Give your honest but detailed evaluation and be able to back up every point you raise, and ideally put an example of each point in the letter. Boss, I've reviewed the code being offered and I view it as sub-...


9

You're probably going to have to let it go until you get a direct manager. Keep in mind, the person approving your pull request is trying to "do their job" - and apparently, in their mind, "their job" doesn't involve doing a lengthy review of your code. But that's the problem: you can't force them to change their opinion about what their job consists of. ...


9

As the most senior developer on the team, I would say it is part of your responsibility to set expectations for the development workflow on your project. I have worked on projects that are collaborations between senior and competent developers, where pull requests are pro forma unless a PR specifically requests that others take a close look at the code and ...


9

Is giving negative feedback based on anonymous hearsay acceptable for a manager ? For your manager, it was not anonymous. Someone said this to him in some way, so he knows who that person was, but was refraining from disclosing that information to you (which was good, as to avoid to make it personal). Chances are that this person is someone your manager ...


9

Try to have a one-on-one with your coworker. Discuss the problems you both faced. Apologize for the bad brief. Ask for his input about how you can communicate more efficiently in the future (and listen to it!). Focus on how you can improve the situation instead of sheding blame or shuffling guilt around. Hope that he is an equally constructive person.


8

Is it acceptable to avoid self evaluation? Why does that matter whether it acceptable or not? What you need to know is why they ask of this - in first place. My experience: Company does not need to ask you for your weak points, to figure out a way to get rid of you. If they want, they'll get it one way or another. Usually the point of these questions are ...


8

Would it be better to search for a more structure company? If you personally don't feel comfortable working there, and think you will perform better in a more structured company then go for it. Only you know what kind of company suits you better. How common is it for a company to throw juniors in the middle of a team without any instruction/feedback? ...


8

I couldn't come up with a good answer for the question because such an outcome would indicate a massive failure on my part. I think I would quit a job where I got any since that would mean I screwed up badly This is exactly why they ask the question. To filter out people who won't take negative feedback well or use it constructively (even if harsh). ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible