58

On being a "bad cop" As was mentioned before, the way to go is detaching yourself or any person for that matter from the issues to be raised. This means: Your rules need to be clear and written down, be it in a wiki, a styleguide, company documents, whatever you are using. This material must be accessible to the dev in question. When pointing out ...


48

If there are that many mistakes in the code, maybe a code review is too late to catch them. Maybe you need to take a step back. There are some alternative approaches you could take: Training. Doesn't have to be a course. Could be a book, a video series, an exercise site. Personalized guidance. Instead of repeatedly pointing out the same mistakes in code ...


34

The code reviewer is supposed to be the "bad cop". That's your job. If you feel like a "bad cop", that's a good thing and you should embrace it. That said... Junior developers make a lot of mistakes. Pointing them all out is exhausting, frustrating, and demoralizing. If they e.g. name a variable wrong, or they use a linear search ...


26

The answer is kinda mean, but... everything's lining up on the "go all out on enforcement" boat, as much as I hate to look at it that way. I mean, you've said: He "produces low-quality code" (even apart from style differences) The things you've already let slide have cost your other developers unneeded time. He's "very inexperienced&...


11

Don't think that a feedback always have to be negative, it can (and should) contain positive sides also. The general rule for any feedback: Start with a positive note. Bring up the negatives, and suggest ways to overcome it. End on a positive note. Depending on the situation, you can: Surely list down the positive sides (and how those tings helped you ...


10

should I? what should I say? No, there is no point to providing feedback. Best to just move forwards and focus on where you're heading, not the minor setbacks on the way.


10

What are ways to held these guys accountable & make them take ownership? Those are two different issues that are connected. You are the person that can hold them accountable. They cannot hold themselves accountable. That is not how this works. So it is up to you, to take action when they fail a task. For example you expected feedback, they did not ...


9

Try to have a one-on-one with your coworker. Discuss the problems you both faced. Apologize for the bad brief. Ask for his input about how you can communicate more efficiently in the future (and listen to it!). Focus on how you can improve the situation instead of sheding blame or shuffling guilt around. Hope that he is an equally constructive person.


8

I couldn't come up with a good answer for the question because such an outcome would indicate a massive failure on my part. I think I would quit a job where I got any since that would mean I screwed up badly This is exactly why they ask the question. To filter out people who won't take negative feedback well or use it constructively (even if harsh). ...


8

I haven't received an offer, I received a rejection based on the bad feedback, that I believe is wrong. My general goal from here is to improve my situation, if possible, and overturn the decision in my favour. Broadly speaking that's not going to happen. Once a candidate goes to the binned pile, I can count on fingers of one hand the times when he ...


8

I do not want to change the work culture You may not want to change the work culture, but you need to change the work culture. You have inherited a team which is not doing their job. I'm sure it's very fun for them to sit around, chat, have a nice laugh and maybe watch a few videos on YouTube, and I'm sure your team like it - I'd quite like it if I could ...


8

If you absolutely have to "get it off your chest", the only route is Reply to one of the emails (say from "Jack") asserting you would be contacted today or tomorrow (ie, quoting the shortest extract of that text) Also include the VP on that email Use very brief language like this: "Jack, I have heard nothing back from anyone ...


7

There could be many reasons on why a manager may step into meetings between analysts and clients. Maybe this is an important client, and they only want to deal with a single person, and that person may have to be of a certain seniority. The manager is certainly under no obligation to give credit to members of their team when talking to clients. In fact, I ...


7

Use every opportunity to show your strength. They are not really bothered about whether you actually faced that scenario or not, they want to know your mindset on how you will handle when that scenario happens. If a day comes when you have to face / handle that scenario - what would be your mindset, thought process, strategy and mental strength to counter / ...


7

You don't have to consciously try to slow down. What you have to do is interact with the people you are talking to, instead of just talking. As you make points in your talk, look at the listeners. Look at their reactions. If they aren't reacting, pause and wait for some response: a nod, a question, etc. By doing this you'll learn to deliver ...


7

How many of these style rules are actually written down? My organization (sometimes) does code review, but one of the issues is that we do not follow any meaningful rules regarding the authorship of code. You can get entirely different (and frequently contradictory) feedback depending on who does the reviewing. It also does not help that most of the code was ...


7

If people think leadership is restricted to managers, they will never show enough leadership to be promoted to being a manager. This isn't uncommon. Your manager is giving you an opportunity to mentor a new employee and is trying to 'soften' the feedback. Instead of telling the new employee directly and having them get all snowflake-triggered, the manager ...


7

When your boss/manager asks for your feedback about his performance I think that he is interested in how you judge his management of you and other members of your team. So I think he (and perhaps his boss) are probably not that interested in whether you think he has a strong work-ethic. In my opinion far more interesting/relevant points would be. Does he ...


6

I know what it feels like if someone speaks way too fast. It is hard to follow because a lot of information comes to you in a short time and words are likely spoken unclear if someone speaks really fast. In these cases I thought at least they could make a short break every now and then, it would give me some time to sort out the many words a little better. ...


6

Based on my experience on both sides of this process I will say it's OK to ask for this. But in most of the cases you will have your request rejected or ignored. Probably HR department have a lot of candidates and have no bandwidth to provide detailed feedback for every candidate. What you can do about the skills: read very careful the job ad (also check ...


6

No no no Think of the privacy of the individual. They filled in the form for a specific use. That use does not include your CV The survey was done for the company. Its results and data belong to the company and not you Would you employ somebody that does not care about personal data?


6

I can't exactly answer your question, because you use almost identical words to tell us what you experienced and then in the proposed email, and ask if it's accurate, and since I have no independent knowledge of the situation you're describing, I can't know how accurate it is. However, I can still give you some advice. You're "burying the lede" by ...


5

I completely understand your honest intent to provide a constructive feedback, but let me warn you, you should be really really be careful on what you say as part of the feedback, because in some places / countries, any statement containing a slightest hint of personal favoritism, choice or preference can be held against you and the organization (as ...


5

I don't think individual comments would be appropriate but an overall score would good especially if it is high. One thing I know about these call centers is that at the end of the call, they give a survey. That survey is then used to measure your rating that is then used to rate you as a employee. A score of 98% is usually really, really good and I think ...


5

It sounds like you got scammed. You should never do a homework project that entails doing real company work unless they pay you for your time.


5

This can be a very demotivating and complex situation, as a former manager who was a new manager once and knowing that most workplaces do not have formal New Manager Training and often Start-ups have not invested the up front time in setting up a proper HR system or outlined expectations as a manager I would suggest the following to be sure you create ...


5

1 - Know the power dynamic Since it's not clear - I'm not sure which case you may fit into... but realize that there's a big difference between asked and unasked for feedback, as well as feedback that comes from a buddy, mentor or superior vs. someone who is a fellow member of the team. If this person asked you for feedback, or you are in a role that is ...


5

How can I write this information in fancy manner in my self appraisal to make it sound more appealing I'm going to give you the advice I give on resume reviews and performance reviews. I recommend quantifying your contributions. Obviously not every contribution is quantifiable like running scrum or doing code reviews. But having zero numbers in your ...


5

No You don't have anything to gain by sending the unsolicited feedback - given that it's a startup, people involved in the process are already more or less aware of the problem and your email is likely not to change anything expect for burning bridges. If you have to do something about it (i.e, make yourself feel useful), leave a review at Glassdoor or ...


4

How can I productively respond to this criticism? Given that you also say, I would be open to this, but their suggestions often don't make sense to me. I would start there: I would be open to using a 3rd party library to [accomplish task/solve problem]. If you have a specific one in mind, we can discuss whether it's suited to the project. In the meantime, ...


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