New answers tagged

0

What's happening here? You're upset. What do you want to do about it? Write a feedback. Who needs this feedback, the company or you? It's a part of your coping process, you're the one who needs it. Solution: Talk about your feedback with someone, eg. publish it on a dedicated site (like Glassdoor). In fact, by posting here you're already doing it, just wrong ...


2

The last thing any company wants is feedback from someone they rejected, pointing out the flaws in their process. The only thing you would achieve is being blacklisted at that company, and at any company people from the original company move on to. It's petty, unprofessional, and possibly fattening. Seriously, we had someone do something like that once, and ...


4

It's not worth it. The recruitment process, as you've described, appears ill-conceived. If your application was successful you would presumably not be expected to work without a compiler or IDE. To assess your suitability for the role based on these artificial parameters (and without further discussion of the exercise) is absurd. They risk letting excellent ...


-2

When the interview process is broken to the point that you probably wouldn't take the job anyway, why bother? Asking developers to code without compiler, IDE, documentation and all the other customary tools of the trade shows either a profound lack of understanding of how we work, or a desire to be exclusionary in that you can be rejected without providing ...


10

should I? what should I say? No, there is no point to providing feedback. Best to just move forwards and focus on where you're heading, not the minor setbacks on the way.


2

So your collegue gave you a brief but positive appraisal, despite having had numerous conflicts with you ? Seems like a nice guy/gal to me. What should you do ? Nothing, except be grateful for having such a nice non-backstabbing collegue.


3

... we had lots of conflicts That is actually where you need to start solving the problems. Caring about a feedback being too short is not going to help you much. Conflicts usually arise from lack of communication, or even bad communication. You should get rid of "being mad" and actually talk to this guy, to understand his point of view. The fact ...


1

I'm sure there's a library that can do that For instance like this: I wish! That's why I spent two days looking for one last fall but I couldn't any. Did you? This accomplishes several things: it acknowledges his input it shows them where you agree with it (in this case, you agree on intent, but not the solution) it shows that you have already considered ...


4

How can I productively respond to this criticism? Given that you also say, I would be open to this, but their suggestions often don't make sense to me. I would start there: I would be open to using a 3rd party library to [accomplish task/solve problem]. If you have a specific one in mind, we can discuss whether it's suited to the project. In the meantime, ...


4

I am not a very confident developer, and so the constant repetition that I am writing code wrong, without any real concrete guidance on what to change, is demotivating me and seriously slowing down my development speed I think you are looking at this with a negative perspective. Your coworker is merely stating that they suspect that a library already exists ...


7

There could be many reasons on why a manager may step into meetings between analysts and clients. Maybe this is an important client, and they only want to deal with a single person, and that person may have to be of a certain seniority. The manager is certainly under no obligation to give credit to members of their team when talking to clients. In fact, I ...


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