82

How do I properly follow-up with a hiring manager, to check on the status of a position? In short, for all practical purposes, you don't. It's kind of a catch-22: clearly the employer knows you interviewed, so if they don't respond, it means they haven't made their decision yet. On the other hand, if they have made their decision and you are not their ...


46

It is less than wonderful etiquette. It is also extremely common. Companies these days all too frequently never call the "unsuccessful" interviewees back. In general, they will almost never say why someone was not hired, for fear of lawsuit. The ugly reality is that you don't have the job until and unless they formally call and offer it to you, and until ...


43

I had saved interviewer number who had called me for interview so can I directly call to interviewer to just follow up or it is not professional? Do not do that. (Assuming that "directly call to interviewer" indicates the number you saved is more of a personal /desk number and not the main office number) You are supposed to follow up with the HR / ...


28

It's really hard to say. They should have sent you some sort of reply. That's pretty common but I suppose they don't have to. They may not be in any hurry to hire someone. They could be fielding a large volume of qualified people. People can react very negatively to being corrected too, you can't control that. There is a possibility that you're ...


23

Based on your response, you are still being indirect. If you really like the first place, you should put your cards clearly on the table: You have another offer and need to respond within a week. You would prefer working for them instead of taking that offer but are not in a position to turn them down without a counter offer. This is information I ...


19

I once interviewed with a company that I didn't hear from for about 4 months. When I did finally hear from them, they offered me a job. I would pursue other leads, assuming this one to be on hiatus or perhaps dead in the water. But, I wouldn't be shocked if you wind up hearing back finally, later. The people doing hiring are often quite busy with work ...


17

Don't call or email. If they select you, you will hear, if not it is most likely that you will not hear. Just keep looking at other positions in the meantime. If you get too anxious and keep contacting people they might decide not to hire you even if they were thinking about hiring you. Do not be a pest.


16

It sounds like the first call was not very well scheduled - it was one of many possible times. That could make it difficult for you to be available at all of those times - what if you need to use the washroom at some point? I'd be a little surprised if he'd completely written you off (especially if the vague scheduling was his idea). In the future, I'd ...


14

I disagree with almost everyone's opinion here. If I'm the hiring manager and I need to choose between 2 candidates who are equally qualified, and one seems more enthusiastic than the other for the job, then there's no question I would go with the one who's checking in frequently.


14

The question that would guide your decision is, would you be prepared to take one of the other jobs? If the answer is yes, then you have little to lose by enquiring and informing them that you have other offers on the table. However, it can force a decision either way, so be prepared for a rejection or even more delays. Do not jeopardize the offers you ...


13

As mentioned in another answer, they may not have made the decision early on Friday. In my experience, issues of various sorts can delay decisions for several days or even weeks, although things are generally faster now than they once were. Contacting those you interviewed with can be a double-edged sword: If you don't follow up at all and the process ...


12

Yes email them, be polite and come across as being genuinely interested in the job. Review the job ad/posting to see if there are clues about deadlines. Sometimes they wait until all the test results are in, before determining who moves on to the next round. In the meantime keep looking for jobs. You don't have to wait for word from one company before ...


12

Most companies only follow up with successful candidates no matter what they told you in the interview. Do not expect a response ever. In over 30 years in the workplace, I have only ever gotten a call from a job that I didn't get one time. Companies don't generally have any vested interest in spending time calling people they chose not to hire. Even if you ...


12

Keep following up. You have a positive relationship with them. They know that they not just a good programmer but that you are a case where good help is hard to find. They almost certainly have other stuff on their plates. Give them the benefit of the doubt, keep following up but take no chances - keep floating your resume and going to interviews. No putting ...


11

I'm pretty sure my skill set matches their requirements. Unfortunately life is a giant contest. You might match their requirements but they also might have find someone who matches it better or who has a bigger motivation. The job opening is still available as I can see on the website. That might mean they are not done with the recruiting process and ...


10

You've received a verbal offer. Now you are fully justified in being persistent in your follow-up. I would make a small change to your email. Instead of "could you send it to me at your earliest convenience," try "how was the offer letter sent to me?" Assume that the letter was sent and something simply went awry in delivery. I would also make a phone ...


10

She didn't specify the exact date but I figured it won't take more than a day since it's only talking to other dept. There's your mistake. Instead, you should have ended the conversation with something like "What are the next steps?" and if it wasn't mentioned "When can I expect to hear back from you?" Well it's been 3 days and I have not received any ...


9

"Rude" a term normally applied to an action taken-- such as asking improper questions in an interview. Not doing something you're obligated to falls under "thoughtless", "discourteous" or "unprofessional." All of those adjectives apply. Current practice is that an employer owes you nothing if you're not called for an interview. Once they talk to you, they'...


9

The best thing to do is to send them something like this immediately: Hi Ma'am/Sir: Good day! I would like to thank you for the good response you gave me a week ago. That gave me confidence and I want to pursue my application. I just would like to ask about my status. Am I still qualified for the position I applied for? I am hoping for ...


9

I have interviewed for hundreds of jobs, and been accepted for dozens, but not ever have I got a call back to let me know I was not chosen. It sounds like they have not gotten back to you for a while. This means that they are not going to hire you. Odds are, as amazingly well as you did on your exam, someone else did better, or was a better fit over all. ...


9

Well, sending an email thanking for the time is a good idea. Now, what are you trying to convey in the email? Work that out, then write it. As an off-the-cuff response that you might want to edit, but might make a good skellington to reference: Bob, I would like to thank you for your time interviewing me last week for the Weapon X Project. I have since ...


9

You have your firm answer. It has been two months and they are not interested in your application. I'm sorry - some companies just don't care about informing candidates that they haven't been successful. It's time for you to forget this company and move on. If they do (eventually) come back to you - do you really want to work for people who treat ...


9

So I recently had an interview with an engineer and the recruiter followed up saying unfortunately we are not moving on with the process. All the feedback you need is right there. An interview isn't a collaborative process designed for the mutual benefit of all participants (well, unless you get hired). I understand your desire to get better at interviewing,...


8

I'd hope for an answer from a potential employer within a week but that wouldn't prevent me from interviewing anywhere else in the mean time. You don't know what's going on inside the company. The position may have been filled, it may have been cancelled, it may be that they're busy and will get around to filling it later. I once interviewed someone in ...


8

Do I email my boss/HR rep again politely reminding them of my previous email and asking for a response or do I wait? Usually it is recommended that you wait at least a week before writing back. However, seems that you have waited enough already. As suggested in comments it would be better if you give them a call. You surely have some number or contact to ...


8

This is a good thing. If the company wasn't interested in hiring you, they'd cut you loose and tell you straight out. They wouldn't want to "Catch up" only to let you down hard. At this point, given the timing, I'd probably expect two things. They will present you an offer (Best case) They will schedule a second interview with a higher level manager/vice ...


8

Companies get hundreds of emails daily to their recruitment team. Emailing is likely going to get lost amongst these until found at a later date. Is this a red flag? Should I re-apply? Is this a weird rejection? No, No and No. Just call them to get an answer. If they ignore the phone call, call again.


7

If they said they would make their decision on Friday, it might have been one of the last things they did before leaving, so I wouldn't necessarily expect to hear back before the end of the day on Monday (one full business day after they said they would make the decision). The earliest I would follow-up with HR and/or the hiring manager would be sending an ...


7

If you had scheduled a time to take the phone interview, and they decided to call another time, you did not mess up at all. The company messed up by calling you when you were not available. If you are still interested in the company, I'd suggest choosing some one hour time-slots during the week that work well for you. Send these time slots to the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible