New answers tagged

0

How should I approach my review concerning this topic? Firstly, don't be scared of starting a salary raise negotiation with your manager. Asking for a 5-10% salary increase is not rude or out of place, so there's no reason to be scared. If they take your request as "disrespectful", well, maybe after all your workplace is not so amazing, despite all the ...


4

Not being prepared to leave certainly removes arguably the biggest leverage that employee's have in salary negotiations, and for what it's worth never make that threat unless you're prepared to follow through on it. That's not quite the same thing as declining to remove any doubts they might have about whether you would leave or go. Raises to retain people ...


-1

I'll add a bit to the choir of voices telling you to find a compromise. Realistically you leaving will hurt the company. For sure, it's not your problem, and it's very good to be aware of this fact. Especially in small and gelled companies/teams folks tend to forget that, with downsides for everyone involved. But still, I'd try to find a compromise with the ...


-1

As I see it, it is for sure not abusive resignation but there is another angle which is you are completing a sort of achievement by delivering the new version. Even if you find a new job you can mention the situation and the new employer would understand as it is a moral obligation. They would respect you for that. 20 years ago I had an offer from P&G ...


0

I agree with @davnicwil and @SimpleJack. The answer to the legal question is clearly no, it is not abusive resignation. But I think the moral and strategic issues of whether you should leave before v2 is completed point clearly toward staying. Yes the lack of a replacement is the employer's fault. So what? Did you ever warn your boss about this? If not, you ...


3

It is not your problem, it is theirs There is nothing special about your resignation. A company always has the risk that one or more employees become unavailable, for whatever reason, temporarily or not. There is something special about what the company did. They choose to accept this risk, instead of preventing the problem. It is not part of your job ...


1

As already discussed by most answers: this is very unlikely to be taken as (better yet proven) to be harmful intent. You're almost certainly safe from a legal standpoint. You have no obligation to stay but I ask that you keep this in mind. It's very likely that you will burn bridges by this action, and it may have consequences on references and your CV. It ...


5

Even if the company manages to hire a new developer to replace me before the exhibition, it is highly unlikely that the v2 will be ready in June. This is sometimes called having a "bus number" of one. This refers to the rather macabre calculation of the smallest number of employees who would seriously threaten the project or even the company if they were ...


22

The other answers raise good points, many of which I agree with, but I'll offer a counter-position which I think is worth considering I have no intents to burn bridges or harm my employer. Frankly, there's a high risk you'll do both here. Not just that, but if you quit now, you won't have delivered this important project. Yes, you're being paid day to ...


27

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? For your resignation to qualify being abusive your employer must prove harmful intent. In theory quitting in the middle of a key project for the company could qualify (source here) but only if they can prove it was your intent that they present an unfinished project. A 3 months notice is ...


139

So my question is : can my resignation be considered as abusive? No. Slavery time is over, and if a company does not want to lose you, they are free to rectify whatever bothers you to convince you to stay. But you certainly are free to resign from a job whenever you please, and given the 3 months notice period, there is no way for it to constitute an "...


9

First of all, you didn't resign with the intent of hurting either your company or your boss. Obviously no one can hold you responsible for this. I don't think leaving just before a deadline is a case of abusive resignation, your boss should be the one to always be ready for someone leaving, even in a small company. If you don't have interest anymore, you ...


3

The fact you didn't raise HR any formal demand to avoid work with your colleague hints you probably already imagine the answer to your question is "no" - you can't refuse to work with him without at least risking to get fired. You can however complain to relevant organization (HR or your "CSE" representative) that your coworker is making sexist jokes, and ...


-1

First, I agree with all motosubatsu said. Some companies I have worked for have some sort of anonymous complaint inbox. If this Bob is acting in an inappropiate way, you could make use of such tool. The more documented the complaint, the better. That way HR could look into the situation. If they act on it, he might change his attitude, and even if he doesn'...


-3

Nobody should have to work with a sexist or a bully. Not you and not your colleagues. You don't know if many people are suffering the same problem. If nobody speaks up and has the courage to highlight the problem, it will never be addressed. Your manager and HR don't know what they don't know. Directly refusing to work with your colleague is not a good ...


7

I'm fortunate to be at a company in the US with clear policies and training on Workplace Harrassment. From that training, I'd judge your coworker is not harrassing you per se, but that person is certainly being disrespectful. I don't believe you have grounds to refuse to work with this person. Honestly, it could be relatively mild behavior compared to ...


26

Is there a way I can officially refuse to work with him? (without me getting fired) Going straight to refusing to work with them is not the best course of action (nor is it likely to be successful). Instead you need to establish cause not to work with them. Start by documenting everything they do that you feel is over the line, just a notepad or a text ...


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