84

I am the only person who can perform the duty. Not your problem, not your fault, and not yours to assess. do you think it's a wise idea? Probably not. You changed jobs which means your priority should be company B, not A. Firstly you need to check your contract and the policies of company B. Some companies outright forbid moonlighting and many require ...


36

I just am wondering how potential employers are even going to view my time spent freelancing. Doing projects and freelancing isn't the same as working a regular job. But the specifics matter. It might be as good. It might be better. But it's clearly different. And that difference is something you will need to address with a hiring manager. It might show ...


14

I did this exact same thing, and it worked out splendidly. I had a calm 1:1 meeting with my superior at the time, and told them that I would be handing in my resignation. When asked about the state of the current project, I said that I am open for continuing a reduced schedule as freelance worker on the side of my new job (make sure your new position is okay ...


13

If you have a written agreement outlining the scope it's easy. You just include that with a message saying that the extra work is out of scope and giving a costing for the extra work. This is normal procedure, so do it confidently and professionally. Outline the costs and ask what timeframes they need it done in as if it was an entirely different job. Then ...


11

In my experience of working with needy clients, best filter is billing practices. There are no problematic clients, only problematic relations. Unless his voice / tone / way of writing irritates you, produce invoice after each interaction for work complete / hours worked. Do not forget to bill the communication time as well, most of the customers that make ...


11

Considering you have had an existing relationship that previously worked, and that your client asked for a new invoice, it seems he has an honest intention to pay, but it is currently difficult for one or multiple reasons. Submit another invoice with a late fee included, and a schedule for additional late fees. At this point, submitting invoices with the ...


11

The problem with freelance experience The problem from am employer's point of view is that "Freelancer" listed in the job history doesn't provide any useful information. Working as a Freelancer can mean anything from "highly skilled and efficient worker with great communication skills", to "did some small jobs for family and friends ...


8

It would be polite to let the freelancer know. For all you know, they may be planning their work around your contract. If I organised a tradesman to come to my house to do some work, and I no longer needed them, I wouldn't delay in letting them know. For some freelancers they do need a steady stream of work to put food on the table. Keeping them in the ...


6

How do I use this for myself as a teachable moment? For the next time I suggest you stick to what the project included: developing a site for them. Two things I see here: You are charging a small amount of money, which ironically can have the effect of making people say "whoa, what a bargain! Let's see if I can get more out of it", and in a way ...


6

What should I put in the Employer and Supervisor slots? A freelancer is self-employed. Your supervisor is whoever supervises your work. That depends on the particular gig. If the form permits, putting "Self-employed" usually communicates the situation well. If they are looking for references, the parents are the one who supervise your work. Ask ...


6

Sure, if you are up to it - why not. Of course it depends on any non-compete clauses in your existing contract and new contract, you need to check those first. It's rare that you get a chance to "double dip" in your I.T. career, but it can happen (for example you get laid off with 9 months severance pay and can get a new job within those 9 months). ...


5

It all depends on the employer. The ideal way a freelancer going into a job does so, is with people who already know them. It's certainly experience, but the quality is unknown, so it's often judged as lesser value for a couple of reasons. Firstly if you're a freelancer looking for a job then it implies you're a failure as a freelancer. Secondly it says ...


5

Is it polite to not give follow-up reply to a freelancer? No, it's rude and inconsiderate. A simple "No thanks, I've decided on a different option" is all that's needed. Case closed and everyone can move on with no loose ends. It takes less than 10 seconds.


5

The customer requires a lot of responsibility from you. They expect you to work hard, deliver, and respond to them in a timely manner. It's hard work. In turn, the customer has ONE responsibility to you: they have to pay their bills. On time, in full. If they aren't paying you, then they aren't your customer! You need to be proactive and insistent. Train ...


5

I feel this is a combination of my and my client's fault (mostly mine), but how do I deal with them? Do I just say sorry and keep working? Try to explain what's happening and why things have taken so long? You say you already finished the app, so I suggest you deliver it and put an end to this stressful situation you were in, and move on. Make sure you get ...


4

An additional, important piece here is to communicate clearly when new requirements are added (because there will always be gray areas in contracts). You can say something like: This requirement was not included in my original time estimate, and I will need to evaluate the effort required to fulfill it. Depending on the size, it may have to be deferred ...


4

I really like the opportunity of exercising my "hobby" during worktime for my employer whilst getting paid for it (normal salary + expenses), but also like the idea of earning some extra money, since I'm saving the company the costs of hiring a film production company. How and who would I best approach with this? Don't mix the streams here. ...


4

If this is on company time, they already pay you to be there, I don't see how you could ask them for money. The company is already paying you, and while you are doing that, you are not doing any of your IT related duties. If you are doing this outside of company hours, that changes things. Personally, I wouldn't charge them as "Timothy Gruntzner the ...


4

First, as a freelancer, your time is money. What you are doing is selling your time to clients. If the client keeps interrupting you with calling/emailing/texting, you might want simply provide regular status updates about the project. If that doesn't work, you might want to inform the client that these interruptions are eating into the original 20 hour ...


4

I'm afraid they could undertake legal action against me. This isn't an issue, they're ignoring you hoping you will go away because they don't have the work to give you but don't want to say so. You're a freelancer, go get more work. If you're expected to be exclusive then that would be contracted. Check the contract terms, because if they're not fulfilling ...


3

What does this experience count as? It counts as experience! Working as a freelancer is still experienced and you should definitely list it, discuss it, and use it to your advantage. however, I am aiming for stability and full-time employment. So you supported yourself with freelance work. That's GREAT! But now you want some stability in your work. ...


3

When you work for an employer you are supposed to ensure them the amount of hours written in your contract, not the 24 hours of every day. Therefore if you have also a freelancing activity that you do outside your working hours, mentioning it when applicable for the position you are applying will be beneficial. Be sure to make clear what you did as employee ...


2

Tell them how much is done and how much is remaining. Give a realistic estimate from today. If they get angry, simply say that due to the changing requirements the scope got bigger and thus you haven't been able to deliver. If there's something else that's causing this delay, simply say that you're sorry and give a date. It's also reasonable to be able ...


2

Find out what legal jurisdiction this falls under, your country or their country, and then send a Demand for Payment letter to the client based on whatever jurisdiction this falls under. If you're so inclined you can engage an attorney to advise you. In most cases, at least in the US, your only legal recourse is to sue them.


2

Yes, you can mention your freelance work on your resume. And if it is at all relevant to positions you are applying to, you should mention it. As someone who has been part of the interviewing process for software developers, I want to know the breadth and depth of your development experience. On the resume, you can format it something like this: Software ...


2

Two legal things you should consider: In germany for example such an arrangement, where you continue the same tasks as a freelancer will be seen as employment, not as freelance work. with all the legal consequences, taxes, health insurance, etc. check your local laws about it. Anything that goes wrong will have to be evaluated, if it happened during your ...


2

The responsible thing to do, the thing that'll leave the best impression with everyone, is to plan your move to the other company for AFTER the conclusion of your project and transfer of knowledge to someone else in your current company. Most companies will understand that you have critical work left to do that will take a while to complete and if they want ...


2

No, it is not a good idea to tell your employer that you can take this on as freelance. When you are leaving one employer, it is often very important - both for you and for them - to fully leave them. There have been several questions on this board on how to handle questions and requests for help from people at the old employer where answering the requests ...


1

Is it realistic to think that the freelance path can be used in a way that I could work for a limited amount of hours while still having a decent amount of income to sustain myself ? Of course. Many people do it successfully and happily. Given your financial background and needs that looks entirely viable. If so, how much time would it roughly take to get ...


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