496

Is this type of requirement common? No it isn't. It's also a security issue and a sign of a problematic client. Unless you're desperate for the work I'd just refuse. The major advantage of freelancing is that you pick your clients, your times and your conditions (these should always be clearly defined and agreed at the outset). If you allow a client to ...


465

You and your client agreed on a per-site rate. If it had turned out to be way harder, would you have been allowed to charge $1000? I expect not. I faced this in real life when my staff would insist if we estimated 10, gave the client a fixed bid of 10, and they got it done in 8, we should only bill 8, otherwise we were "stealing" from the client. ...


303

First, if you worked 53 hours, you need to bill for 53. The client is getting the value of 10 extra hours, and you're giving it away for nothing? Don't do that any more. Second, "budget problems" is a negotiating tactic in this situation. The value of your work hasn't decreased a bit. You can't call your phone company, electric company, or landlord and ...


253

This is simple, get payment on what was contracted before doing any more. If they want EFGHIJKL then give them a quote on it. This is the professional way to do things. If you do EFG before getting paid out of some misplaced sense of 'whatever', expect to be told to do HIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ. Do what's in the contract, get paid, then negotiate anything extra. ...


210

I'd respond with something similar to: Thank you for your inquiry. While I'm unable to accept a ticket to your event as payment for services I'm happy to provide a quote for you and a payment plan once we've discussed the project requirements. Let me know when you'd like to meet or call regarding this project.


173

Get everything in writing The client wants you to do a job that is substantially different than what's in your employment contract. They want you to do it under unusual and technically-challenging conditions. These conditions are possibly unethical (for the managers) and carry significant potential risk for you (mostly reputational, possibly legal). It ...


170

However, I also can't justify working for free You don't have to justify anything to anyone but yourself. One angle the other answers haven't touched on is goodwill and client relations. When you go out of your way to do someone a good turn when they're hurting it's never forgotten. You may not believe in karma (I don't really). But reputation as a ...


160

DOCUMENT EVERYTHING Every time there is a change of scope do the following: Document the change. Show the effects this will have on your work Submit a new timeline Have the stake holders sign off Scope creep happens, but the only way to avoid being the one who gets the blame is to document everything, demonstrate the effect, get people to sign off so ...


148

You agreed to perform a task for a fixed amount. You fulfilled your obligation. I once worked with a group of top-notch people who could fix things in minutes when it would take others days to do the same thing. I would always tell them that "It's easy for YOU not them, if it were, they wouldn't bring their machines in here." Or, as the old joke goes, ...


141

the risk of exposing another clients work via (2) - software becomes unpatched leaving a giant hole in my system or a screenshot of a chat with another client This is why I will not use screen-logging software, and I do not know of a single free-lancer who will allow it on their computer. You likely signed NDAs with your clients. Installing this software ...


133

My previous contract said nothing about providing notice of renewal or non-renewal of contract, so legally I would be fine if I refused to renew the contract. But ethically and professionally, would this be right? You are under no obligation - legally or ethically - to "renew" the contract. You used the term "renew" here, but realistically, every ...


131

As a 17 year old you'll probably find two sorts of clients to start with. Those who already know you or are referred to you and online ones wanting cheap work done. With the online ones it's not actually necessary to meet them physically. I've done a lot of work for people I have never met. I've done the work cheap, and I'm not keen on taking time off from ...


108

That is polite enough in my opinion. I would make it even shorter. "I'm sorry but I don't do work on those terms, please let me know if you would like me to provide a quote for the job." If they don't answer I haven't wasted much time. It clarifies my position and leaves the ball in their court if they want to negotiate.


107

You've kind of broken one of the first rules of freelancing. There is an old consultant's rhyme that goes: Roses are red, Violets are blue, Pay me. You've given this person free work long enough that now they expect it. It's time to put a stop to that. I would recommend finishing what is on your plate and telling them that you can't continue until your ...


102

Because the domain name contains my first and last name, I'm afraid it might seem unprofessional or redundant. I disagree. michael@michaelberry.com (not my domain!) strongly hints that you're talking to me, and not some member of staff that I've also hired. That comes across as a positive, a more personal touch. You could go for something more generic, ...


90

Yes, your best bet is to charge only for the ten sessions you agreed to, even if you actually gave more. Why? It was your mistake. Never charge a customer for something that is your mistake. The customer might not have any extra money available, and might have stopped taking sessions if they thought they were going to be charged more. They would certainly ...


89

DO NOT LET ANYBODY SPY ON YOUR PROPERTY AND WORK!! If you work on the clients premises, using their property and licenses then they have every right to keylog and screencapture. But that's not the case! I'm afraid you gave them ideas with your too detailed, itemized timesheets. Why would you even do that? You give an estimate and once you draw up a ...


82

we do not have any contract or anything written down on paper This is not just the context, it's part of the problem. Don't get me wrong, not every favor you do a friend should be documented. But what you're doing now is much more than just a favor. You need to reevaluate what "friend" means in this context. As you know I keep most of my funds in ...


80

You're a freelancer, if you want the money do the job. If it interferes with your ethics, but you still want the money, go to church more often or rationalise it another way. If it's totally at odds with your ethics, turn it down. Personally I don't care about what happened prior to me getting the work. My only focus is on the job itself. If I'm breaking ...


80

Mea culpa I think @Neo's answer is on the right track, but I disagree with the implementation. Consider Since I've been here, I've made a few mistakes. One of the first big ones was that when you told me to develop a test harness for the application, I didn't insist that we scope that change. At the time, I simply agreed that a test harness was a ...


79

My position would be that you did the work and therefore you should be paid for it in full. The fact that you forgot to invoice them doesn't change that. Given the circumstances, you probably don't want to be sending out an invoice saying "Payment due in 30 days", but I'd hope that if you talk to them, they'd be able to come up with a means of paying you in ...


73

Is it wrong not to renew a contract without notice? ... ...at the start of November, I met with my boss and the CEO and told them that I would leave unless they paid something comparable to I was getting from freelancing. The premise here is all wrong. You gave them notice. Two months' worth. That's far more than the two weeks they'd get from ...


71

Assuming you are not in a Union (if you are, call them first). The Blunt Approach Send one final letter (by recorded delivery) saying that unless payment is received you will be instructing lawyers to begin recovery procedures. This is via the industrial tribunal system. A Softer Approach You could try your local Citizens Advice first for advice. Be ...


71

As long as you think that you need good reasons to turn down underpaid freelance work you don't enjoy doing, you will be stuck doing this forever. Your reasons need only be good enough for you. Next time he asks you to make a change or to do something, tell him "My apologies, but that will not be possible." If he starts to argue or tell you why it ...


69

I can renegotiate but this situation does not give me much security in the future. What would you do? How can I say in a professional way that I do not accept the proposal? I would refuse to negotiate my rate down. Frankly your rate is on the cheap side for that type of development and they should be grateful you are charging such a generous rate. If ...


68

If it costs time, it costs money. The client should provide all the information needed to get started, including documentation of their system if it exists. From experience, it doesn't usually. There are a number of variables here that both the client and the programmer need to take into account, although this list isn't exhaustive: Quality of the code ...


62

As per the terms of your contract, the company has 45 days to respond to your email, by paying your invoice. You have so far provided them only 21 days. It is rather unprofessional of you to hold them to a different standard than the contract specifies. Yes, they might fail to pay you within 45 days. They might announce that on day 44, or they might not ...


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