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0

As an ex-UK contractor, I second the "roughly twice your permanent salary" and the Ltd Co. Get PI insurance for the company as well. Your accountant will do payroll for you and can also offer all sorts of decent advice. Expect to pay about 100 GBP / month for accountant. But I think you will have to save that for next time.... for this contract you are stuck ...


11

The usual rule of thumb in contracting in the US is to take your annual salary and divide by 1000, and that gives your hourly rate. Multiply that by 8 and you have a day rate. If you were working FULL-TIME, that would appear to be a 2x increase. Since, as a rule, contractors will typically have a significant amount of unpaid "on the beach" time, and will ...


49

which of these things is it reasonable for me to account for in calculating my day rate? All of them, plus the biggie - at the end of the contract they won't have to pay you any redundancy money. As a contractor, you need to factor in the time it'll take to find the next contract, which could be a month or two every six months. All these things mean that ...


18

I'm going to leave aside that fact that you negotiated poorly in the first place; you already know that. Learn from it and move on. And also, how would you suggest re-negotiating based on this? Make sure you have enough money to walk away from your client. Being able to say "No" because you have enough money to pay upcoming bills for at least the next 2 ...


-1

As a rule of thumb, the annual salary should be 120-150 daily rates. If your annual salary is £37,000 then your daily rate should be £250 to £300. How do you re-negotiate: “It seems I was very naive with my daily rate. You took advantage of that for a year. So the rate will be £300 per day. You take it or leave it.” If they don’t agree: “Also, if you ...


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