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3

Perfectly normal. A 40h contract is 40h of work without breaks. In addition according to German labor law your company has to give you a break after 4h of work, so working for 8h straight without break is not allowed.


2

All the places I worked is 9 hours per day. 1 hour lunch, 8 hours of work. You do not have to stay at the work place for your lunch break, and you can leave for your hour lunch. Some folks do not take the lunch and leave an hour earlier than others since they worked their full 8 hours day. In some cases, you get an hour lunch and 15 minutes midday breaks. ...


1

A 40 hour contract is for 40 hours of work. Lunch and breaks do not count as work and therefore are not part of the expected 40 hours. Depending on your position and the industry you're working on you have more or less flexibility on your work schedule, being able to do half hour lunch break and leave half an hour earlier or arrive half an hour later, or ...


7

Most places you are expected to put in 8 work hours and lunch does not count and is not paid. From second answer to "8-to-5 vs. 9-to-5 as acceptable regular work hours" I'd add that while that's true, in some types of jobs like software development and sales there's almost always flexibility in scheduling. Management realizes there isn't a 1:1 ...


10

I can only speak from personal experience, but most likely your children are not the reason: in Germany, it can be incredibly difficult to get into academia. Our university has a daycare for children and if you can’t get a spot there and no one from your family can take care of your children while you are at work, you are allowed to take the children to ...


13

As you didnt put a location I will bring in my German perspective: Here, it is common to get only yearly contracts when working in academia(even for doctoral degree roles) and thus having an unstable income. Another point is you will need to work long hours in order to finish your degree, which might be a problem when you have to take care of your children....


80

(It is in dispute if this answer is suitable for Germany) Are children a reason to be rejected for a job? Yes. Are children a VALID reason to be rejected for a job? No. How can I prove they rejected me for this invalid reason? You cannot. Remove the personal information from your CV. You may want to take a close look at your CV to make sure there are ...


-2

I just wanted to add a side aspect: motivation letters are pretty old fashioned, so you can get away without them - at least in IT Jobs. Especially things like „why I think your company is the best to work for“ can best be formulated by skipping them. Make sure you mention on what Job you apply, if you would be willing to use similliar jobs and where your ...


1

To give a new perspective, you also have other options. I am also french and went to live in germany for 4 years. You don't have to start in Germany with a real work, you have other alternatives to start smoothly. Social work One way is to do Wwoofing or a FÖJ, this way you will live in a german environment and you will be able to speak german a little ...


1

All other issues aside, this would be a very foolish argument. Depending on your contract, when you leave, you may be able to get your days "cashed out" at your current rate. This means that if you have $30k of leave currently, and you get a 10% raise, that $30k becomes $33k. Which means immediately, the company's liability increases. So, basically you're ...


2

My answer may be somewhat anecdotal and subjective but I am a foreigner who has been living in Germany for three years, two studying and one working. One difference between us however is that English is my native language. I have observed three things during my time in Germany: In cities, there is a large amount of English fluency, almost ubiquitously ...


3

Benjamin's answer is great. Try it yourself first with extreme care, then ask for the help of a native and correct your mistakes. I would definiely write my presentation letter in German rather than English or French! When a English letter/CV reaches us (I work for a Spanish company), we often take the impression that it was a generic one send to dozens of ...


11

personal opinion: write it yourself, and maybe have someone who speaks German look over it. I am German and work in Germany. When I read a letter from non German speakers, I just cared for motivation and experience. If you want to work in a German language only company, your letter should convey that you will be able to do that, but nobody expects flawless ...


8

This could backfire in many ways: It may signal that you may be a workaholic - someone who works so hard for so long that they get burned out. Companies allot time off because they know employees perform better when they use it. It may signal that you are not very good at managing your own schedule and resources. The "threat" of having to pay a handful of ...


25

Is unspent vacation time a good argument in pay negotiations? No. The company has already given you those days. The fact that you have not yet used them is irrelevant. From the company's standpoint, any value that those vacation days provide is already in your possession to either use or cash out if you leave the company. Your boss will surely be aware ...


10

In my experience, it is always harder (if not impossible) to adjust your low starting salary by getting raises, than it is to start with a higher salary from the beginning. The biggest salary increases I managed to obtain in my career so far were exclusively by switching to another company, and starting there with a (much) bigger salary. I'm sure that, had I ...


2

Sure! Just ask for it! If you have a realistic estimation of the worth of your job, then it will not be difficult to find someone that pays for it (in your current company or otherwise) Address whoever is responsible in a calm tone, explaining your perspective on the issue, but focusing on them rather than on yourself. This means talking about what you are ...


4

First of all, you should check you contract, if it includes bodylease or not. If not, he cannot lease you to another company. Please understand, that there is a difference between bodylease (AüG) and your company working for another company at their site (Werkvertrag). You should look up the differences and check with your situation, what applies to you. ...


7

I've worked in this kind of industry for many years in the past, where I've worked for a company that coded for clients. I spent about a third of that time working on client sites. Doing this makes sense - the clients get to know you and your attitude to your work, they see that your company is fully committed to them, and you (as a developer) have the ...


4

If your colleague told your boss to do something, or simply refused to do the task they were allocated, it's no surprise they suffered a negative response. If your employment conditions have changed since you have been hired, it's fair to go to your boss and ask to renegotiate your contract. Especially if it is a change to something you asked about during ...


-1

not been sufficiently qualified for the job and the contract was terminated very soon Maybe change the focus away from race and discrimination and look for ways to convince him that there are sufficient skills and qualifications for the job? Are there ways to do some formal assessments or ways to for you both to see the level and type of work that the two ...


1

First of all, I am not passing any judgements regarding any region, or any judgements on the suitability of the selection criteria, other than to address the concern that it was racist. The section of the act you mention is quoted below (in English): The purpose of this Act is to prevent or to stop discrimination on the grounds of race or ethnic origin,...


-1

He said he was "uneasy" not that he wouldn't consider them. I'm certain that hiring managers have been "uneasy" about hiring individuals simply because they didn't support the same sports team as the manager. If you really feel a candidate is good then you can push for them to be given a chance. Of course it's in your interest to make sure that the ...


3

As far as I know, in order to get a Blue Card in Germany you MUST have a bachelor degree where both the degree and institution where you got it are listed in the ANABIN Database. In case it doesn't, I see two options: 1 - You can try to get you degree validated through the ZAB. Takes a few weeks, requires a few documents and you have to pay. But if ...


3

from https://www.eu-bluecard.com/validity/ You have the right to appeal for re-evaluation of your EU Blue Card permit status. The hosting states’ competent authorities will determine the court and the time where the appeal may take place. If you do not apply before the deadline, you will be rejected. So you should have the right to appeal the Blue Card ...


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