214

When your manager asks you to perform a task and you don't have time to do both that task and everything else you've committed to, tell him that. You can inform him of your workload and still be respectful. Try something like, "Sure boss, I'd love to do X, but I've already committed to do Y and Z, and I don't have time to do all three. Which tasks should I ...


106

a salary study showed we lagged behind 20% other localities starting salaries This is simple, the real answer is you need to get your resume prepared, find another job, and then leave your current employer. Based on my experience, the government sector has never paid what the private sector will for comparable skills. Also, most governments lag behind ...


54

This first part is ALL you. You're complaining, but how many breaks do you take each workday? I'm guessing that it's zero. Eating lunch at your desk -- who made the decision to stay and work through lunch? And maybe, just maybe, you're working overtime after everyone else has left for the day -- who made that decision? Look in the mirror. If you are ...


35

Since you're with the state and under budgetary constraints and locked in pay grades for your title, the only way for you to address this is with a title change. Each state has a list of job titles. NJ for example http://www.state.nj.us/csc/seekers/jobs/title/ research a job title that fits your roles but pays more and ask what would need to be done to ...


21

Get a spreadsheet started that lists all the projects you're working on. On mine, I keep track of who requested the project and when, involved parties, a priority level, current status (if you're reworking a project or waiting on something from someone, put it here or create a notes section), and an expected completion date (or # of hrs required to finish ...


20

It is also hard to get fired from a State Government job. Tell him flat out you cannot get the work done in that amount of time. If he tries to fire you or put you on a PIP (Performance Improvement Plan) he will (well should) have to prove you are under performing and compared to your peers you are not under performing.


19

Having gotten and let expire a few clearances over the years, I can answer a few of these. Once you are given the clearance, it is yours, you are the one cleared, not the company. If you are not offered a position, but were granted the clearance, you will be able to apply at other positions with the same clearance requirements. The new FSO will just "...


15

As GGMG said, most drug tests are taken in private. If a urine test is not possible, there is always a hair follicle test, or a blood test.


15

Look up, not down So Mister Positive has a very good answer of "go get a new job." Its positivity may be dubious, but never forget that that is the one power an employee always has over their employer. Now if that isn't the answer you are looking for, look up. Look at what other people are trying to do, and how you might be able to help them do it. Have ...


12

I would suggest your friend start by reframing what happened. Your friend was not demoted, and even more so your friend was not demoted for a political reason. Your friend's department was eliminated. This is a thing that happens in both public and private sectors. Sometimes (rarely) it's because the people in the department aren't doing their jobs well. ...


12

I think I can justify a starting salary at step 8 which is about 25% more than the initial offer. Realistically, I would accept a starting salary at step 5 which is about 13% more than the initial offer. How should salary negotiations for positions with a fixed pay scale be handled? Reply to the email (in person if possible, by phone if not) ...


11

Thank you for encouraging me to take on a permanent role. It means a lot to me that you think so highly of me. I truly enjoy the people and the work, however, after a lot of thought, it makes more sense for me to remain a contractor. Show your appreciation you were considered and encouraged to take the role. Let them know that you enjoy the work and the ...


11

As a probation officer by trade, our department dealt with a handful of offenders with shy bladder (and, yes, it is a very real condition). We offered those select few a "lollipop" test. It's an oral swab that you suck on for about fifteen minutes. That's it! These tests are highly reliable and are similar to buccal swabs. I would suggest: Google "drug test"...


10

Since Richard nicely covered that this likely won't be an issue, this answer will just assume it may be. https://www.drugs.com/article/drug-testing.html states that: Certain laboratory procedures may require direct visual observation while the specimen is being voided. To your question: How can I handle this if I'm required to take a drug test? ...


10

It would depend on the skill and the exact duty, but if you've been doing a job for 4 years that requires you to do it even for 25% of the time, I'd call that 4 years of experience, and emphasize you have 4 years. The hiring manager might have different ideas, but it's up to you to sell it.


10

It varies. Also, I believe that you are looking at this wrong. First, laws about taking breaks and what breaks they have to offer you and overtime and so forth depend on what kind of employee you are, and what state you're in. Unfortunately, I couldn't give you exact details on this even if I did know all of the pertinent information. I am not a lawyer. ...


7

You should not be working for government. People will here give you all kind of elaborate advice and attack me for generalizations, but truth is simple: In private sector people that are more productive are generally rewarded/promoted more(obviously if you are silly enough to let be exploited you will be, but generally employers will try to reward you ...


7

If you want the government job then you will need the reference. Yes, it is a risk for your current job but only you can determine if it is worth the risk. You can approach your supervisor with something like this: Hey Supervisor, I have been presented with what I feel is a great opportunity with the government and I would like your permission to pass ...


6

I used to work for the government (USA). There are very specific requirements for each grade. There is no negotiating. This is the reason I left union/government work (besides it being very boring) and is the sacrifice you make for having relative job security and good benefits. If you are looking to make money, you will have to be in the private sector.


6

Become an American Citizen, Permanent Legal Resident or Refugee/Asylum Seeker According to the US Gov site on ITAR regulations: ITAR regulations dictate that information and material pertaining to defense and military related technologies may only be shared with "US Persons" unless approval from the Department of State is received. By definition, a ...


6

I have been in this situation several times. There is no solution that can be had without being proactive. Ask yourself what you want. If you're happy with the workload but want more $$, ask for more $$. If they're riding on your back a good manager will know this and push hard for a raise for you. Whenever you ask for more money there is an implication ...


6

In the US when bidding on a government contract there are two types of resumes that are included in the proposal: key personnel, and example personnel. A key person is one that the company is committing to the project. If they win the contract that exact person will occupy that exact position for a specified number of hours for a specified duration of time. ...


6

Based on the wording of the policy specifically referencing that "an employee has received an offer from another employer" I would never mention prior to the point that you have an offer in your hand. Doing so would be risky, since you'd be exposing the fact that you're shopping around prior to having an actual firm commitment from another employer. The ...


5

There are some questions on the SF-86 Questionnaire for National Security Positions that are specifically oriented toward professional behavior as well as the use of information technology systems. Based on the examples in your question, I would suspect that you would likely have to answer 27.1 or 27.3 in the affirmative, and provide specific details ...


5

No, that's patently false. From tax history project: Individual income tax returns — including those of public figures — are private information, protected by law from unauthorized disclosure. Indeed, the Internal Revenue Service is barred from releasing any taxpayer information whatsoever, except to authorized agencies and individuals.


4

It seems less effective but stupid policy out of government is not that unusual. It strikes me that this should be less of a big deal to get your parents or a friend from your hometown to take a picture of this and text or email it to you. It's definitely much less paperwork than getting the registrar of many universities to send confirmation of your ...


4

I work in a company that deals globally and is subject to ITAR restrictions and employees foreign nationals of many persuasions. While being a US citizen/resident is one way to work with ITAR related stuff it is possible for a foreign national to do so as long as they are individually licensed. The term you want to look for is ITAR Licensing for Foreign ...


4

First ask your supervisor to prioritize when you have too many tasks to do for a reasonable timeframe. Or ask if the deadlines can be pushed further. If everything else failed, learn to delegate, and ask your supervisor to either give you the authority to delegate, or ask him/her on a per project basis when needed. But think beforehand to who you can ...


4

There are so many ways to 'read' what your manager may be trying to do by extending your probation, that I am not sure whether he himself knows what he is doing. And based on everything you said about him, chances are he doesn't. With that in mind, I think trying to get the manager to articulate expectations given his repeated failures to do so is a lost ...


4

Yes, that policy is strange. Why do you continue to work where you are now if the only way to get a raise is to either transfer or threaten to leave? If someone else is willing to pay more then take the offer. Your employer doesn't value your work for what it should pay - if they did you should be able to negotiate a raise without the new offer. If you ...


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