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360

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


70

Do you also plan to take the computer, monitor, phone, etc with you? The answer to your question is likely the same for them. It's equipment purchased by the company for the purpose of you doing your job. I have a 43" monitor on my desk and a pair of $200 noise cancelling headphones. I'd sure love to take both with me on my last day in 2 days. But ...


25

As others already stated, these items are company property unless some unusual law is applicable, or you paid for it, either directly or as a deduction from salary. That said, if you believe such item would not benefit any further employee, it is OK to ask if the company is willing to sell it to you. For example, headphones and microphones that are hard to ...


17

This depends on who paid for the item in question. If your employer bought it for you, they get to keep it. If you paid it yourself, or if you received a grant from your health insurance, retirement insurance or some other agency (this is possible e.g. in Germany, to enable you to continue to work, referred to as "Zuschuss zu Hilfsmittel am Arbeitsplatz"), ...


11

What can I do? If you haven't started already, document each occurrence where your roommate disregards your needs (the need to sleep is not trivial). After you have accumulated some data, I would then sit down with your roommate one last time and spell it all out. Review your documentation, emphasizing the impact it has on your ability to sleep, and let ...


10

You are experiencing an issue with a company-provided benefit, that is having a severe negative impact on your ability to do your job, and you have already made reasonable efforts to address it with the roomate and even by wearing earplugs. It's absolutely time to go to the person managing your training and explain that the schedule incompatibility with ...


6

OSHA dictates PPE must be provided where risks occur and that the employer must pay for it. The employer is responsible for assessing the PPE requirements for performing work in the workplace and following through on providing it. Failure to comply has major financial and reputational consequences. Should your employer not take worker safety seriously an ...


5

One point, only beause other questions didn't cover it. If the desk is in your house e.g. because you work at home, then the practicalities and cost of the company taking possession of it (assuming it's theirs) may mean that they concede ownership without any argument.


3

The company may simply 'not care' about it. It's probably wiser to ask, casually, 'Oh, by the way, do you need the desk back?' just in passing. If you put it in writing someone will have to give an official, binding answer. Under similar circumstances several years ago I retained items already at home, including:- A Mac Pro & dual monitors A digital ...


3

Are there any suggestions on what I can do? Buying your own PPE as suggested in the other answer is a way, if you can and are willing to cover it with your money. For the "communal" PPE (First Aid, bandages, etc.) you can coordinate with the rest of your coworkers and buy that equipment together. As it is also of their interest, they will surely be willing ...


2

Some of the existing answers take the approach of convincing the smoker to just wait until everyone who is sensitive to smoke has gone home. That's not enough -- even if the smoker only smokes when they are alone in the office, the smoke gets into everything and can cause problems for sensitive people the next day or in the longer term. (It can also cause ...


2

In general, physicals related to seeking a new job look for some main things: Are you healthy and capable enough to perform job duties, including those that occur only rarely or in emergencies? For example, if you were being hired as a home health aid, it might be plausibly required that you be strong enough to lift or roll patients. An example of that ...


1

If you do ask, try to put it into "business terms". IE: companies buy equipment and put depreciation tracking on them. If the desk has been in use for a long time, then it may have depreciated to the point of being "worthless" to the company, so anything you pay to them would just be money in their pocket. However, depreciation is dependent on the ...


1

Buy your own ppe. This will keep you safe and might spark discussion among others who feel the same to raise it with management.


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