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363

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


72

Do you also plan to take the computer, monitor, phone, etc with you? The answer to your question is likely the same for them. It's equipment purchased by the company for the purpose of you doing your job. I have a 43" monitor on my desk and a pair of $200 noise cancelling headphones. I'd sure love to take both with me on my last day in 2 days. But ...


44

I don't think you need to choose your health or your job, at least not in this instance. Try to get any threats in writing. Try to get any instructions to work in the office, in writing. Joe is not really doing much to suggest to me you should be risking your own health to earn him an extra $50k. The fact that he is willing to risk your health, and the ...


30

Go straight to Joe's boss and tell him what Joe said to you. Talk to your team first, since anything you do will be more effective if you act together. Try to agree on what your response should be. My advice is to go to Joe's boss, and go together as a group. Threatening someone with lies is the sort of thing that gets people fired, and good riddance. ...


28

I spent a few years in my career doing a lot of business travel. It was hard hard work. After a few weeks I definitely got "road burn." It made me irritable and, honestly, my relationships with family and co-workers suffered. Here are some things I learned about staying healthy and happy. Recognize that it's hard to stay healthy / happy when traveling all ...


27

As others already stated, these items are company property unless some unusual law is applicable, or you paid for it, either directly or as a deduction from salary. That said, if you believe such item would not benefit any further employee, it is OK to ask if the company is willing to sell it to you. For example, headphones and microphones that are hard to ...


25

Simple: The moment Joe threatens to tell nasty lies about me, I’m out. After informing the branch manager and whoever is above him of everything that happened. Joe can say goodbye to his $50,000. Will you be fired? The company still wants that game finished. There are only two people who can finish it, and Joe isn’t one of them. Joe is a liability.


21

You don't need to bring your coworker into things at all to bring this up with the appropriate people in your company. It's very considerate of you to be concerned about your coworker's health, but you don't need to mention him or any assumptions about his schedule or other behaviors. I would even suggest that you not mention the coworker's schedule (it ...


17

This depends on who paid for the item in question. If your employer bought it for you, they get to keep it. If you paid it yourself, or if you received a grant from your health insurance, retirement insurance or some other agency (this is possible e.g. in Germany, to enable you to continue to work, referred to as "Zuschuss zu Hilfsmittel am Arbeitsplatz"), ...


16

Step 1 is to choose if this is your battle. This feels more like it might be childish antics of the company (or at least some in power) like, “no one is telling ME how to determine and provide what this company needs.” than an outright attack on cleanliness. I could envision HR and management having discussed and that being part of why HR “allegedly” did ...


15

Take PTO, then unpaid PTO, if necessary, until the company comes to its senses. This won't take long at all, especially if a critical mass of employees do so, it effectively shuts the firm down regardless of the firm's position. If you're a little more couragous, and have the resources to afford the blow back, just tell your direct supervisor, "I'll be ...


14

You mentioned In your organization it's allowed to work from home (what you mention as home office), You already have the setup (HW + SW) required to work from home and, you have a very valid reason for asking to utilize that option. You need not worry about what others may or may not be doing (ex: taking the required precautions, following the safety ...


13

You did nothing wrong. Your co-worker did something that endangered all the people she worked with (including yourself) and was contrary to company policy. You were completely correct in pointing this out to management, who directed her to take the correct action, which she did. Your co-worker may not know who it was who told her boss. In any case she is ...


12

It depends on your country. The link you posted is to the UK site for Farnell. In the UK and US an employer is legally responsible for providing personal protective equipment (PPE). A step you can take is an official letter the head of your company, with a copy to your manager, asking for them to provide the previously requested (adequate) PPE, specifically ...


12

That depends on the type of travel, the work you are doing, how many timezones you are serving, your relationship status, your personality, your talents, the frequency (not percentage) and your aptitude for this. So i expect the impact to be dramatically different between you have no permanent health conditions, are married for 30 years with grown up ...


12

You have ample time to prepare, so there is no need for panic (yet) The country of India has currently recorded 73 cases and 1 death (died this morning, a 73-y/o man) and has a population of 1.339 billion, meaning (1 / 1 339 000 000) * 73 = 0.00000545% of the population has the coronavirus. That's an insanely low number (for the moment). This means your ...


10

When in danger, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout! It sounds like the most fearful person in this situation is the CEO. I fear they're behaving irrationally toward workers. The company's reputation is seriously at risk here. To fire somebody who got sick during a pandemic would make a very compelling story in the media, and that story would ...


9

Staying healthy should be the top priority, with all else secondary IMHO. However, there is one thing I'd recommend trying. Short of refusing to work in the office and therefore presumably standing a good chance of being let go, if I were in that situation I'd be putting my concerns in writing and waiting for my boss' response: Hi Ed, as you're aware Adam ...


9

Ah, in a comment you said you are relocating from another jurisdiction. That gives you an opening to ask the company's benefits person (HR) to explain more fully, and you should do that. "I'm not from here, so could you please help me understand this private insurance benefit? Why does the employer and not the insurer need to see my records? Where I come ...


7

You may not know it but I am going to guess that your company has a chemical/cleaing policy by just being in California. https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/hazcom.pdf This is very strict as having an Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for any cleaners/chemicals in a workplace and how they are stored. Because the wipes/soap were not company ...


7

There are a lot of good answers and comments already. I won't quote studies since the others did that already. Instead I will bring up my own experience. I spent several years working 4-5 days a week in various European cities. I understand you will be spending less time travelling, but your distances will be bigger: Most people do experience negative ...


7

Moreso than any other surface? Numerous surfaces are touched by multiple people every day. That is why offices are being closed and people told to work remotely. Not sure what makes the vending machine particularly special compared to the office kitchen or the bathroom (as let's be honest, handwashing is not always happening there either) or the light ...


7

Get organised - this is the sort of reason unions were invented. If you alone refuse to come in, the boss might feel he has to fire you in order to maintain his authority. However everyone does it, he can't fire everyone without destroying the company. That's the nuclear option though, you can start much softer. Everyone in a team can make their views ...


7

In the UK the use and processing is governed by the Data Protection Act.. This is a law that requires companies to use and store your data only for relevant specific purposes and under strict regulations. If the company has a relevant reason for having your complete medical history (a real reason, not just in their opinion) they can make you give it. If not ...


6

I don't know what country you're in, or what sick leave rules are typical there. But under the circumstances, you could talk to the trainee and say something like: "Normally I wouldn't be worried about someone in the office having a cold. But with the coronavirus in the city, and my wife pregnant, it's different for me. If you want to take some days off, I ...


5

How do companies take into account public health in order to improve their organizations? For example, which departments are typically responsible for creating new policies based on public health principles? HR is typically the department responsible for creating such policies.


5

One point, only beause other questions didn't cover it. If the desk is in your house e.g. because you work at home, then the practicalities and cost of the company taking possession of it (assuming it's theirs) may mean that they concede ownership without any argument.


5

As someone who recently asked to switch to remote working full time - I know asking can seem daunting. Your manager is probably the one to ask so set up a face to face if they are available soon but if they are away or busy all afternoon an email will probably do (case by case basis). No need to worry about everyone thinking you're being paranoid or over ...


5

Is it realistic for an employee to influence an employer, and the HR department, to add a high-deductible health plan to the medical benefits offered by the company? A single employee? Probably not. Many employees? Perhaps. Make your preferences known to HR and encourage others to do the same. The more employees join in, the more likely HR is to ...


5

Ideally you need to ascertain whether this is has crossed into a clinical depression (i.e. you have a medical condition as opposed to simply "feeling sad"). I'm not in a position to give you a diagnosis one way or the other, and unfortunately I expect all the pandemic disruption will make getting a clinical evaluation harder than it would have been ...


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