Hot answers tagged

558

You're paying for it - why not use it? If they explicitly wanted to prevent you using it for such conditions then they would have a policy that excluded them.


365

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


310

It need not have a significant impact. Many programmers work with medical issues ranging from quadriplegia, to blindness, to carpal tunnel syndrome. Some programmers have long and productive careers without ever learning to touch type. I personally have found that being able to touch-type reasonably quickly does help my productivity, but after working for 35 ...


297

Healthcare plans are not limited to work related problems. They are a benefit, like flexible working hours or no dress code. If the plan covers it, there is no reason to not use it.


287

We can not tell you what you did wrong (that sounds odd to me too), but your HR person has given you the hook you need by claiming that the employee handbook forbids it. This means you can (politely) ask the HR person to point out the relevant policy, so you can review it and make sure you understand it. If you'd thought of this during the meeting you ...


216

Be careful of ultimatums You have every right to want a smoke-free work environment and are entitled to one by law. In your shoes, I would consider quitting myself. However, if you want to give them a chance to fix the problem you are simply more likely to achieve your goal by not making demands. {Boss}, I had to leave early today because the smoke ...


175

You went under your desk to plug a keyboard in. You are using that keyboard for work. If you don't plug it in, you can't do your job. OF COURSE this is a work related accident.


147

I think that there is a different point of view that's not being considered here, but it's difficult to know for sure with the little detail that you provided in your question. It seems very unusual and unlikely that HR would have a policy that prohibits something as simple as a visit to a co-worker in the hospital. Obviously, I'm basing this off of my ...


138

I'm kind of worried it would make some kind of 'bad' impression in my first day. Or am I overthinking? Using crutches can happen to anyone, you should not feel bad about it. If any, I suggest you write an email or similar to your new boss, explaining to him/her about the accident and the crutches, but that you will be there at work as agreed. This way your ...


123

I am a web developer, and I lack the use of both hands and wrists due to quadriplegia. You need not fear that losing the use of a hand excludes you from the programming field. As you say, there is much more to programming than typing speed. I type at a sad maximum of 20 WPM, yet I still am considered a competent developer. However, there are difficulties ...


116

You tagged your location as New Jersey. To be clear, what your employer is doing is very much illegal. Here are some references: https://www.fda.gov/tobacco-products/compliance-enforcement-training/report-potential-tobacco-product-violation https://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/tobacco/regulations/ You said, I know that this is probably illegal but I don't ...


100

I believe there should be a line somewhere between suggesting / advising good practice and appearing pushy for implementation. You don't need to chase everyone, individually to make them follow the advise. Your organization made enough attempts to make the employees aware of the danger and given them guidelines for safe posture. Now it's up to them to ...


72

Do you also plan to take the computer, monitor, phone, etc with you? The answer to your question is likely the same for them. It's equipment purchased by the company for the purpose of you doing your job. I have a 43" monitor on my desk and a pair of $200 noise cancelling headphones. I'd sure love to take both with me on my last day in 2 days. But ...


69

is it unethical to use the healthcare package to cure a problem that is personal [....] No, not in general and definitely not in your case. It's completely ethical and you are expected to make use of that policy / fund for your individual betterment (for health care). Any organization, wants their employees to be fit, active and healthy - this increases ...


66

We could inform my colleagues, during our monthly meeting, that they will be hearing a beep over the PA system. They could use this beep as an audio cue to re-align or adjust the posture. Oh holy noodle.. that sounds truly awful. Not only is it guaranteed to be annoy a large portion of the workforce it also wont be particularly effective. Assuming you have ...


64

You are overthinking this. Accidents happen, and any employer worth working for will understand. If you're good-humored about it, you might even be able to endear yourself to them and leave a good impression on your team.


56

Helpdesk nurses are in the awkward position between healthcare and helpdesk, she probably has a script she has to stick to. The "got hurt at work" box on that particular flowchart likely only has one line going you of it: "The guys from Legal will chew you out if you say anything here" Because, even in more civilized countries, getting hurt at work lands ...


55

I used to work with a developer who was missing most of his right hand. He had some of his index finger, and a thumb, both very small and weak compared to his good hand, and no other fingers on that hand. This had no obvious effect on his programming ability, and he was regarded as quite talented. He did not try to type with that hand at all. He could move a ...


50

is it unethical to use the healthcare package to cure a problem that is personal and does not affect my professional duties? No. Paid healthcare is compensation, like salary. A good sanity check for questions like this is to ask if it's unethical to use your salary for your operation. Certainly not. It seems you're thinking of your healthcare benefits ...


47

People tend to react strongly against: 1) Being spied upon and having transgressions alerted to everyone in the office 2) Being told how to live their lives 3) Being distracted when someone else in the team earns the "posture police" alarm tone (assuming they can hear it over their headphones) 4) People in the team who repeatedly and intentionally sets off ...


40

First and foremost: I am not a lawyer. You're in the U.S., but you don't say what state, so I'll speak from my experience (having been in your exact situation) in Ohio, but you might have a different experience (for example, California has much more pro-worker workers' comp laws). First: report the injury to your employer. Regardless of whether it ...


37

It's not at all uncommon to have friends at work. I was once friends with a couple at my office and I would regularly visit them at their house. However, nothing you've said has indicated that you are close friends with this coworker you visited, other than the fact that you thought to visit him. Hospital visits are a special sort of case where a person is ...


37

I myself struggle with maintaining my posture sometimes, and have found browser extensions/add-ons to be a useful solution. I use one called PostureMinder (available on Firefox as well as Chrome to my knowledge, and maybe others). You simply set it to pop-up small desktop messages every x minutes to remind you to maintain a good posture. There are options ...


29

Please don't be a lousy human being by mentioning rumors like that. If the guy has a medical condition it is up to him to manage it, it shouldn't affect his ability to do the job if he can manage it or otherwise come to some arrangement with management. It is simply NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS.


28

I'm a software engineer too. I broke my right humerus a couple of years ago and the inflammation ended up pinching off nerves and leaving my whole right arm a useless floppy noodle for months. I ended up using a software version of the Half Qwerty keyboard. I broke my right arm, so I would put my left hand in the usual spot on the left side of the keyboard....


27

If you injured yourself at work and the injury was caused by lack of training or insufficient safety equipment/precautions on the part of your employer, there may be need to have documentation that the injury happened on the job, and the company's insurance paying for some or all of your treatment. In this case, you need to have an official visit with your ...


27

As others already stated, these items are company property unless some unusual law is applicable, or you paid for it, either directly or as a deduction from salary. That said, if you believe such item would not benefit any further employee, it is OK to ask if the company is willing to sell it to you. For example, headphones and microphones that are hard to ...


24

Assuming your colleages are all grown-ups I find it quite ridiculous to have a posture police to make everyone sit straight. I bet they are all very aware of the damages bad posture can cause. It is up to them to decide what to do with that information. And what's next? Enforce a healthy food policy and beep on people's ears when they have chocolate and ...


24

Inform your manager that due to the "Smoke-Free Air Act of 2006" his actions are illegal. Politely request he bring the office air quality up to code. (I am not a Lawyer, this is not legal advice.)


24

HR is not your friend... BUT in this case, actually it's not your managers friend. I wouldn't bother talking to your manager about this; at all. He will know full well that he's breaking the law; and if he doesn't; it's not your place to tell him so. Trying to tell your boss what to do will ALWAYS end badly. HR however may thank you for the tip off - as ...


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