New answers tagged

5

I would like to do better the next time I am faced with this situation. How should I handle such situations, so that the other person doesn't feel embarrassed or offended, while at the same time, I can offer to help them with what I know? First off, I doubt Sam was that embarrassed. He must have told you something that led you to believe he didn't ...


0

You’re assuming too much. Someone could’ve pinged him while he was helping you. Got on a phone call, etc. Even if you’re correct in your assessment, you could’ve shared a folder at the 2 minute mark of your session and told him to drop the file there instead. If he’s really interested, he’s going to ask you how to do it.


1

I think it might be helpful to first explore the point of view of your coworker. The sad truth is that in many workplaces asking questions "in the wrong way" can be very harmful to asker. Your coworker is likely acutely aware of that and thus spending significant time figuring out how to do filesharing on Windows 10 is seen as "easier" and less risky than ...


3

Thanks for asking the question. While this has happened with you while working on something trivial and non-recurring scenario, many people face similar problem in their day-to-day work when they are trying to assign / delegate the work to someone else. How should I handle such situations, so that the other person doesn't feel embarrassed or offended, ...


1

You could have gone with something like: "Hi, Sam are you happy setting up a share on your computer, or would you like me to do it on mine and you can copy it over?" If he say's he'll do it then just say. "Ok, any problems just let me know." You've given him two chances to ask you for help. If time is critical and he doesn't seize this then that is really ...


0

I agree with most answers in this thread: whether John is acting of malice or just being your usual passive-aggressive introvert software "brogrammer", he is hurting your reputation while increasing his own. I would, therefore, advise following the routes of action suggested by other answers, i.e. escalating the issue with managers (either upfront, in the ...


1

You seem to be open in principle to working with John, so I think it's an option you shouldn't shoot down before trying it in earnest. I'd ask John to meet to discuss this. In the meeting, point out that his present level of help puts you in a spot where you're unable to make clear promises. You have two options and say you're fine with either: Do it on ...


1

I'm not convinced it's malice yet. After that whenever I'll approach him with a question (intelligent question at that, I do my homework before approaching him) he will answer in monosyllables, most of the times not even turning away from the monitor, just staring at the screen and answering in 'yes', 'no' or other non-answers. Developers like to crawl ...


1

An example: we are having a meeting with manager and/or scrum master and I am asked how long will it take to resolve issue X. I reply 2 days. The manager and scrum master are just fine. But John will jump in with something like this, "2 days are too long, this is a 2 hour task or 4 hour task". My response would be something like, "You are right, but since I ...


2

Schedule a meeting with him I found all answers above are helpful, however none of them saves you from a confrontation, or pointing finger. If you felt the need to create a topic over this, most likely you sensed something fishy - he intervenes your schedule, claims it can be done in 4 hours with his help, then avoid helping.. So make this "help" official,...


4

How to handle a colleague who appears helpful in front of manager but doesn't help in private? So, don't let the work and efforts reside in private. It's always better to keep informed about the probable miss of deadline / estimate, rather than actually missing the deadline and then doing the post-mortem. Assuming that this is a recurring thing (not a one-...


9

Most of these answers are so confrontational... Approach your boss in private to discuss this disparity. You don't need to throw the SE under the bus, you don't need to publicly take a stand and you don't even need to make John aware that you have an issue with him. Get some time alone with the manager and discuss the situation: Hey, I'm having a hard ...


58

John’s time would be called an “impediment” in agile circles. So to move forward without headaches and stressing... Put in your estimate If John says, that’s too high, should be x, respond with “Cool! Let’s huddle up later and we’ll revise the estimate after that once I get your insights on the subject” Go about your day. No meeting? No worries, the ...


5

You have two conflicting goals. Completing the work as fast as estimated by your senior colleague Don't annoy your senior colleague (when he already gives signals that he doesn't want to give his full attention to you) It's hardly possible to fulfill both goals, but I also wouldn't say that it can be expected from you. First you could talk to your senior ...


20

John is probably busy, so book him for a 4 hour meeting with this on the agenda where he is not busy with something else. Do it as soon as you can, preferably right after the meetings where this happen. If he doesn't have time in his schedule, ask him in email with the manager cc'ed to arrange the meeting with you. If he is very busy, ask him to place it ...


141

Don't make estimates based on expectations of the future, make them based on observations of the past. When John says "don't worry I'll help you and you'll finish the task in 2-4 hours" bring up the last few times this has happened. Thanks John, I really appreciate that offer. The last three sprints you've been too over-comitted with other work to ...


9

When you are asked why the four hour task took you two days, you just say "Two days was my estimate. John volunteered to help me, but when I actually asked him for help, I got nothing. " He is throwing you under the bus. If this is intentional or not, I don't know. In either case, you can't let him get away with it. The next time a task is estimated that ...


210

I only want my manager/scrum master to understand why it still took 2 days when John said he will help me complete in 4 hours? Pass it to him if asked. He volunteered to take responsibility, so let him. 'Why did it take two days when John said 4 hours?' 'You'll need to ask John that, 4 hours was his estimate, my estimate of 2 days was correct.' It won't ...


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