235

Can I or my supervisor do something to change this behavior? The CEO can pretty much do whatever they want, the smaller the company the more arbitrary they can be. My strategy to mitigate against this sort of issue was pretty simple. If I was given a change of task directly from the CEO, I would email my supervisor outlining it, and stating where it came ...


189

What can I do? First, refer this person back to your security policy and procedures documentation. These topics should be covered clearly, and you can fall back on the documentation to support your position. If this document doesn't exist, consider writing it, and getting it approved by the appropriate people. Also, I would ask your manager for ...


115

If you cannot beat them, join them. Join in. Make jokes about it yourself. Next time someone mentions it, say something like: Oh by the way, anybody need the kettle today? I planned on trying chili con carne this time. Ok, just kidding. The kettle is safe for now. There is really no way to hurt you by making jokes about you, when you do it first. They ...


86

Would it be appropriate for myself, a new member of staff, to correct a senior member of staff's spelling in this particular situation? As a new employee, I would urge you not to do this, I would point it out to your supervisor. Being new to the company, you want to be careful with the initial impression you make with your peers. If the typo is ...


40

Own it. Decorate your cubicle with pictures of kettles. order some "kettle corn" and bring it into the office. Do a charity raffle with the prize being a kettle. Make this your own. People won't bother to tease you about something you are making light of. Have them laughing with you and they won't be laughing at you. Have fun with it, be creative. If ...


36

I am wondering if this behavior is common for CEO's that have some technical background and have a development department and It is somewhat common for business leaders who have a technical background to have a hard time letting go completely of their previous roles. It's like a parent trying to let go of their maturing children. Boundaries get fuzzy, and ...


34

I personally think that skipping levels in such a small team won't do any harm. First thing, a 20 person is not small. Secondly, it can totally do harm. In most environments, the team leads are responsible for being aware of what the team is doing, keeping it coordinated and removing any impediments. One of the most common impediments to software teams is ...


25

Executive Summary If the CEO thought you were appropriate for this middle management position, you would be the manager. If the CEO thought the position was not necessary, he/she wouldn't have created it. Understanding that this manager is there for a reason is the first step to finding a way to work well with him. Growing Pains Let's say you're an intrepid ...


22

My project is a ticking time bomb. Im a developer on a project which is not going to meet its main deadline about 10 months from now. My boss thinks its on track and nobody wants to tell him otherwise. Its the kind of project where if they knew it was off track we would be swarmed with consultants, the boss would want crunch, and people would be blamed ...


18

First, I hope you've intimated to the concerned department of the broken kettle. If she's not constantly bringing it up but its passed on like wildfire, just wait for it to die down. Every single topic that goes on in an office eventually dies down. Meanwhile you could add in a joke or two about it instead of taking it to your heart. People do much more ...


18

As an employee in a company, how can I know which decisions/courses of action can be taken by myself and which ones need to be escalated or approved? You can work with your manager, to make sure you fully understand your role - the responsibilities, expectations, and limits. Every company is different. Every manager is different. Every process is ...


18

It all comes down to economics. There is an underlying element to all these things. The average employee has no real stake in the success or failure of a project in a typical company. They have a stake in how their actions are perceived to impact success or failure to those above them. Consider the event planner. Unless they are in marketing or it is a ...


16

If you aren't actually involved in the document's editing process, then it's not your place. You could offer to become part of the process and proofread the remaining reports, then you would be taking initiative to make things better (always a good thing for those low on the totem pole to be seen doing). They may not want you to, but if they do, I'd correct "...


15

Can I or my supervisor do something to change this behavior? Yes, definitely. It is also very important. I'd try to explain the same from a personal experience: I can very much relate your situation to one of my workplaces. Our CEO (a high school dropout) has built the company from his garage. As he was the one who wrote the complete code for three ...


15

I've been through this more times than I can count. I have made it a personal policy not to work for anyone other than the person who's money is on the line, in short the person whose business will succeed or fail based on the results of my work. This rules out just about every public agency and major corporation. The CEO is interested in the integrated ...


13

This has to do with the general cultural dimension of power-distance. In America, power-distance is not very great. In general, we tolerate more questioning from subordinates. In Asia, however, power-distance is much greater - employees are not considered as free to question their managers. Regarding your specific words: "No sorry, I disagree because [......


13

Create coding standard guidelines and ask them to provide input and sign off on it. Expand and nuance the standard as you meet new issues in the same category. This wastes minimal time of your superiors (as opposed to arranging a meeting, or handing the problem over to them, or continue as now) and it also creates a document that you can refer to when you ...


12

Yes it matters. By skipping the leads that tells them that they are not trusted. You are a senior manager now, you need to stop being involved in the technical level of detail the lead and developers have. This doesn't mean you can never talk to devs. But it does mean you have to be aware of how this conversation affects the way the lead is managing his ...


9

I'm one of the many network operators at a corporation. One of the board members asks every time, when in her opinion changes are too slow, admin access (credentials) so she can do it herself. What are the changes, exactly? And why is the board member aware of "the changes"? Are you reporting to the board member? I denied it every time and I promised I ...


8

First of all: Don't take it personal (until you know it was meant to be). From what you write it's not clear (to you) why that manager was put in place or why that management position was introduced at all. So your CEO clearly has a communication issue here that you should address - with him. Inquire about his motivations for creating that management ...


8

You can always ask "This is probably a stupid question, I see you refer to our software package as ARC GIS, but I have always seen it referred to as ArcGIS have I been referring to it wrong this whole time?" but you really, really have to sell the "I could be wrong" part of the question tone of voice and facial expression matter.


7

This is a pretty common situation. You are not the first to be in it. It's also one that need not be frustrating, if you look at it the right way. I see this more of a problem between CEO and Supervisor. Your CEO is probably making things more difficult for Supervisor, but it need not be a problem for you. I find this absurd and annoying at best and ...


7

Your company boss probably know something is up - or they likely would not approach you as they have. Present your feed back honestly, fair and objectively. Document with emails and examples. Way to many people are afraid of stepping on other peoples toes, even when change is needed for the organisation to prosper.


7

You should request a meeting with both of them at the same time. Let them know that you like your job but there is a problem you need a solution for. Show them a specific instance of code that one likes but the other doesn't. Ask them which "philosophy" you should follow. They'll hash it out and give you an answer. It shouldn't be a problem after that.


7

Different companies have different policies for that, but normally your name (i.e. the name of the main author) gets included even though you are frequently expected to add the names of your supervisors, including those who didn't participate in the writing process at all. Your first step should be to ask your boss or HR to explain you the policy followed ...


7

Use the Add Note feature when sending a request. Keep it short and simple. The message can vary for person to person, but you should state your intent about wishing to connect. If you simply send connection requests, some may accept, some may ignore and some may mark your request as "I don't know this person". If a lot of people choose the last option, you ...


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