309

Continue to work for this company as a consultant. Conspire with that friendly manager to enlarge your contribution until it is essentially full time or even more. Charge three times what you would have made as a permanent employee. Every time you pass the door to HR shake your head sadly and chuckle to yourself.


109

At this point I do not know what to do next. The manager wants me to get on board and I have a strong track record of references that can prove I can do what HR in a 3 hours evaluation deemed me unable to. What would be the correct course of action? Talk to the manager. Explain what you think happened with HR and that you'd still like to work for the ...


27

I refuse to work for any employer that requires me to sign an arbitration agreement as a condition of employment. How can I let the company know that I'm not interested in working for them if they require me to sign an arbitration agreement You simply need to tell them "I refuse to work for any employer that requires me to sign an arbitration ...


16

That really sounds like it could be a scam more than a job opportunity, since they already had you doing some real work for free, as part of the interview. Or perhaps, as a comment notes, the 'come in for training' is the job offer. If they haven't mention what the pay rate is, then one way to approach this is to ask about pay: I'm excited about this ...


13

Keep in mind that employers will usually not be motivated to provide you feedback once they have rejected you - as far as they are concerned, the relationship is over. This isn't as malicious as it may sound, it's just business. In fact, they may be motivated to not give you feedback - even innocent-sounding feedback can be twisted into discrimination ...


12

This would be the same as any other condition of employment that you want to negotiate on. Make a counter offer and be up front if a condition is legitimately a deal breaker for you. I reviewed the offer and think we are close to an agreement. $X per year is more in line with my experience; I need Y days of vacation per year to maintain what I currently ...


11

My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Not your problem. You've just been asked to write a reference. It's up to the recipient to decide it's usefulness. Should I be frank about the nature of our relationship ...


11

The answer depends on how the company actually performs hiring -- is HR the gatekeeper with the final say, or does HR give advice, and managers do the actual hiring. The first thing is that hectoring HR, or walking past and making noises and faces, is just horrible advice. If I were the hiring manager and I saw you doing that, I'd consider it childish and ...


9

HR people often don't know what qualifies people for technical jobs. It is no surprise that HR speculated on loosely related grounds and produced unfavourable judgement -- it does not mean that you can not thrive in the role that you think you are good for. Ask the manager for help. If manager is on the good terms with HR then (s)he can simply convince HR ...


9

Consider taking your recent experience as having a potentially very positive impact on your future. As an employer, and a hiring manager, I like to see candidates who can fail, learn from the failure, and then grow as a result. No matter what your career, or how much change you're actually looking for, none of us are perfect, and none of us are complete ...


6

Until they make you a formal job offer then keep applying for other jobs I personally would just assume you have not got the current job, if they decide to make an offer then the recruiter will contact you. There is no guarantee that even if they do find another role for you that it will be one that you like.


5

Years ago I played an online game (Goalline Blitz if you've heard of it) and got to know a guy pretty well through managing our team. He and I have now been friends for about 10 years. In every way I consider him a friend and not just an online acquaintance. The reason I bring that up was that when he applied for a job, I served as a reference. ...


5

IF you still want the job, then yes you still apply. Tell your manager you failed their "test" and ask her to request that you be considered regardless. Your manager either has enough pull to override HR's decision or not. There's only one way to find out for sure. If she doesn't have the pull, then you do what @A.I.Breveleri says and continue working as a ...


5

What do you mean "Do I apply?" Isn't that how you got to the 3 hour ordeal? I have been in your shoes. Several of my jobs I've gotten because I have known someone who gave the hiring manager my resume. The manager put my name through, and I was good. On another occasion being manager's choice was irrelevant. I did not get the job because it was ...


4

What is the difference between company direct hiring and through consultancy involvement hiring? Since they are giving you the offer letter, you are directly employed by them rather than employed through a 3rd party consultancy that contracts employment with them. It's likely they have a recruiting relationship with hiring consultancy you've been working ...


3

In a situation like this, do not lie or withhold critical information that might impact your situation down the road. Remember, nothing good can come from withholding this information (your Masters application). My general rule of thumb in life is to not lie or withhold sensitive information. Also, based on my experience, unless your long term goal is ...


3

It's not your problem to worry, it's your manager problem. If I was you, I would tell the manager honestly what happened and what HR said, without asking him to intervene. After this point, just keep working as contractor, and don't hope for anything. If you are to get this full-time job, you will hear from manager, otherwise not. Manager can discuss with ...


3

It is a recruiter's job to take emails and phone calls from their candidates. So, don't worry about annoying her, not at all. It shows her she has a live one (you). These commercial hiring processes move slowly. Be patient. It sounds like that company was trying to fill a lot of positions. A hiring project like that is probably understaffed and hectic. It'...


2

If you're serious about this new career, then make sure a new experience at Company B (or another company) won't end in the same result. The reason was a mix of bad feedback from their part ... Feedback can be really valuable. Spend some time to take it in and see if you can find instances in which your actions (or inaction) caused issues highlighted in ...


2

One way I know of to have clauses you cannot agree with removed from a contract is to actually strike them out and to then send your corrected version of the contract draft back to the other party. If the arbitration agreement is a seperate document, you can simply tell the other party: "I'm sorry, but I will not agree to this. Apart from that I'd gladly ...


2

You asked a few questions, My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Ultimately, that's on your friend, not you, to decide. There may even be specific reasons why he's picking you (maybe he's applying for a job ...


2

I would come clean with them and let them decide what they want. Companies are used to conduct interviews that won't come successfully. It is a normal part of the hiring process. Of course, there is always the chance that somebody may take offense, but you should not worry about it. If you think on the other side, they had no obligation to hire you if ...


1

You could send them a quick notes similar to: Again I would like to thank you for taking the time to meet with me a few days ago. I really enjoyed talking with you and your team. If you have the time would you be kind enough to provide me with a little feedback on my resume/CV or the answers I provided during the interview? Thank you, Wilson ...


1

This is common. There's nothing strange or sketchy about it. A consultancy (or recruiting agency) found you and presented you to this employer. The employer decided to hire you and gave you a job offer. Your employer will, very likely, pay a fee to the consultancy when you begin working. But that is between them. You don't need to do anything at all about ...


1

When writing a letter of reference, I include a statement of how I know the person. I'm delighted that Xxxx Yyyy asked me for a reference. For the last two years, Xxxx and I worked together as volunteers at Zzzzz. Our work required us to interact with users of Zzzz's product Qqqqqq. etc etc Xxxx was a good partner for me. He was reliable.... etc ...


1

I was a volunteer coach for a college sports club. I had several of my players, as well as someone who was as assistant coach when she was a graduate student, ask me to write recommendations for them for grad school, and for jobs. None of those positions were sports club related. So, first of all, it's a personal reference, but what I did was I thought ...


1

What can I do if I want to pursue this direction? Get up, get going. We all have experienced failures. If you choose to pursue your career in a particular field, you need to have perseverance. Learn from your mistakes, take the feedback and work on the areas you need to improve and appear for other interviews. If so, how can I convince them that it's ...


1

How do I go about figuring out what happened and where do I need to improve? Your best bet is through introspection, or by candid feedback from your friends. Should I reach out to the hiring manager and see if I can get a second shot at this? If this is actually the same job (some job postings have IDs attached), then No - don't reach out to the ...


1

Depends on how hungry you are. When I was made an offer from Big Blue, a position was available immediately on contract. HR told me that they would need to apply to the regional office for hiring against a regular post. I told him that getting the approval was up to him and he may choose to do it if he wanted me to join and that I am content in my current ...


1

I wouldn't worry about it too much. An average review is bad if you were looking for promotion or a raise, but still means that you are doing the job. A hiring manager has a job that needs doing. They need to be sure that the person they hire can do the job, and is going to get on with the rest of the team. They don't really want a genius rock star who ...


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