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40

my now-boss walked me through a completely different part of the office...His primary solution is to assign everyone less work to account for the "distractions". Your boss is a deceitful moron and deserves none of the respect and restraint you have so far shown. I would normally advocate communication and everything suggested by Sourav Ghosh, but in ...


28

Yes, this is very OK. If you have any questions about the post, it is better to ask for more information than submit an application and it ended up being a waste of yours and the recruiter's time. As an expat working in the Netherlands, I'd just add a point of caution: make sure that the information you're asking for clarification is indeed not written in ...


21

If an employer provides contact information, it's done with the expectation that you may want to contact them. And, given the example questions you've posted, it seems like you have a legitimate need to contact them - these are typical questions that a candidate may want to clear with HR prior to applying for a job, and if the answers aren't specified in the ...


21

If there are things about someone that I know from past encounters with that person that might interfere with them doing the job I would absolutely take those into account. That might include things like not respecting peoples boundaries or being verbally aggressive or a poor communicator or any of a million other reasons. I would not exclude someone because ...


17

I think people are making this way more complicated than it needs to be. If I had someone that, say, bullied me during highschool was applying for an opening on the same team as me, I would simply say: "I've had personal interactions with them in the past - and they weren't of a positive nature. I don't believe the two of us would work well on the ...


16

Healthy workplace == Healthy and Motivated workforce == Productivity. There is no two things about it. Bring it to the notice of your superiors immediately (this time officially, by setting up a proper meeting through email invite, for example). After all, it's your organization's responsibility to provide you with proper working conditions. If you ...


13

It's not appropriate to screen them, but it is appropriate for you to recuse yourself from his hiring process.


11

Can I back out of the first offer without consequences? You can back out of a job offer at any point in time before you start the job. The only consequence may be some hard feelings on the part of the employer. In many locales, you can even quit a job at any time without any repercussions.


10

You just have to be professional about it and let company A know ASAP that you won't be joining them because you had an offer elsewhere which better matches your long term goals. No need to name company B in that communication. I'm sure a few bridges will be burned, but if you're at company B for the long term, it won't really matter.


10

I can think of a few reasons why the recruiter is doing this. To find out if he should bother connecting you to other clients at all, or forget about you. To find out if his ways of estimating a candidate based on resume are wrong and need to be improved. He needs this in order to not present unsuitable candidates to his clients, which at best just wastes ...


9

What is this call for? The recruiter most likely feels that you were a good fit for the senior position based on your resume and interviews, but that the coding test assignment wasn't completed up to the standards they expected. The recruiter would like to talk to you about this to see if perhaps you didn't understand the assignment, or if there is some ...


9

What can I do to (a) make clear to my boss that I'm on the verge of resigning over these issues (b) that he has to fix this, with the solutions I have proposed to him in the past or with some of his own ideas. Your projected outcomes are unrealistic. Neither of these will eventuate. They're not happening for your colleagues, your predecessor or you. Your ...


8

Rule of thumb: When in doubt, always ask. The company (if a sensible one) will appreciate your efforts for calling them to confirm the eligibility, which saves a lot of time and effort for both the sides. If I get a negative response / vibe for calling a prospective employer up for legitimate reasons, I'll think twice to even make an application.


7

Unless you signed a contract with a penalty clause, there is absolutely no reason why you should not back out of an offer. A future application to the company may not be looked upon too favourably, but that's about it for consequences.


6

Speaking as a hiring manager in Australia, I can’t say that I’ve ever gone looking for a candidate’s SE account. I have gone looking up GitHub though.


5

Is this any normal? You mention that this in in Latin America. It is not rare to be asked those kinds of questions around here. The marriage status is really common. The kids question not so common but also not rare to see now and then. Perhaps, like someone said in comments, they are just following their HR hiring guide/questions to the letter. Now, ...


5

You have no formal offer from company A. Even if you did, letting them know as soon as possible is the right thing to do. You can outline the facts: your salary, benefits, and responsibilities are better at company B. Please keep your opinion about company B being better than A to yourself. If they are a reasonable company, then you will not be ...


3

Yes, you may back out of this offer. Having two offers gives you some power. It is good to use that power to advance your personal career. The best way to use that kind of power is subtly. To exaggerate, think "iron fist inside velvet glove." You can be polite without being weak. The wise / subtle thing is to give the first employer a last chance to get ...


3

If he told you he would arrange a first interview with HR for two weeks ago, it is legitimate to reply asking if he has done it or not. Just try to not make a big deal out of it. Since you already have his email contact, you can just write a line asking if he got the time to look into it or not, then thank him nicely for taking the time. Though it is not ...


2

For my last two jobs I have used my SO actively in my application. Having a Java gold badge combined with a non-trivial amount of reputation is a good thing for a Java developer. It says that you are not only experienced but also a good communicator, which has helped me land the jobs. That said, it is just a single thing in the overall picture. I ...


2

SO reputation can be a double edged sword. On one side, it gives a rough evaluation of your skills in knowing and communicating about certain topics, which might be relevant or not to your work (100k rep in the great outdoor or seasoned advice, for example, do not count the same as 100k rep in finance if you are an accountant). On the other side, some ...


2

Not that I know of in Australia. It would be locale and individual company specific anyway. No one in my country aside from me knows what SE is, and I only found out a few years ago. I've seen a few Australians since I've been here, but they're unlikely to be hiring managers. A large chunk of the World is non English speaking, SE wouldn't mean much to most ...


2

Is it OK to call company for more details about a job post (not an application)? Yes this is always OK. If the job posting is unclear, it is better for everyone to clarify things before going into the interview process. This avoids wasting anyone's time. Don't consider your calls "cold calls", the company posted a position and you are merely inquiring ...


2

Is it OK to call HR for additional details on a job posting? In short "Yes" it is OK to call. Is the job open to non-EU citizens? This is definitely within the wheelhouse of HR. They should be able to answer this question. That is what they are there for. How important is mastery of Dutch language for that particular position? This one should also ...


1

If you have friends or upperclassmen from school who work in a similar field in a similar location, you can ask them for advice on what they are being paid. Based on that, you can go to the company and say something like "after talking to some friends of mine in a similar industry with similar experience, I feel like I should be asking [this much]", and ...


1

You mentioned that this is Latin America. So, there's a chance that this is Brazil. Therefore, my answer is based on this assumption. As absurd as it may seem, for some unknown reason, those are questions every company I've ever interviewed for has asked. I don't think they will do anything related to your marital status or how many kids you have, but that'...


1

Recruitment is an expensive process, and many times, companies will hire a contracting company to manage this process for them. Depending on the setup, it could be a flat fee or a commission or any matter agreements that pays the contracting company. But no matter how the contracting company is being paid, they are not taking it from your pay. Contracting ...


1

How is any of this fake or corrupt? They're not taking money from your paycheck. They're being paid a fee by the company. If you let that fee come out of your hourly rate or your salary then that's your fault. The fee a company pays to a recruiting company is part of their cost of doing business. I don't doubt that they'll try to recoup that cost by ...


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