18

Given that you are short on developers it could mean that to save your time your manager is doing the first round of interviews to decide cultural fit. If candidates are selected they could do a second round with one of the developers. If you're concerned I'd suggest talking to your manager 1 on 1 to ask what the plan is and how you can help to make sure the ...


11

Drop the issue. You have asked and your manager has said no. It is reasonable to be concerned about the situation but ultimately it is your managers responsibility, and not yours. There are a few reasons your manager might not want you in the loop: He doesn't need technical advice. Presumably he has hired people before and, rightly or wrongly, feels capable ...


7

Your manager will learn in time. My boss did that once, hiring someone against actual objections from his engineers (before I started) and it turned out to be a complete disaster. They still talk about him, and the boss has learnt.


4

Nobody here can say for certain what they will ask. It is almost certain that they will just ask how long you worked there and what your position was. In some jurisdictions your references aren't permitted to give more information than that. While extremely unlikely in my opinion it's possible they will say something like "user did badly on our test ...


3

No one expects you to know everything as a new student. That's what school is for. To gain skills. However, phrasing things in a positive light is a great skill, especially when discussing your talents. A few phrases you can consider: Self-taught [skill] Self-motivated learner Quick learner These are basic statements. You should come up with your own, ...


2

It's all about what you've done. If you have worked on a Raspberry Pi project, then you have done it. Nobody cares whether you learned it in school or online or yourself. Everyone has "grown out of incompetence" - the first stuff on their resume is being an untutored bozo, and then they have maybe some school, and then they have maybe some jobs or ...


2

If your goal is to ensure that the new hire is technically up to scratch, ask your manager if you can provide a technical test, or setup a test online via 3rd party supplier.


2

You want to demonstrate on your resume that your a problem solver and self-motived learner. When you start out it is worthwhile to mention all related experience that can demonstrate above. So, by all means, say I learned python. If you can back it up with the completion certifications, or at least a link to the course. Or a GitHub (others are available) ...


1

"I don't know what I'm doing, but I can probably figure it out if you give me some time" That's EXACTLY what many employers are looking for. Sure, you are going to learn some technical skills at your university and you are expected to be able to use these proficiently, but technical skills get stale quickly and the field moves fast. The ability to ...


1

That is subject matter for the interview. Most employers or recruiters have to screen many CVs and many will discard one if they get bored while reading it or it doesn't meet the job spec - bulking it out won't help. A common interview question is 'what sort of things do you work on in your free time?'. You've got a list of good answers in your question.


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