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14 votes

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

The days of employee loyalty to the company went away when companies stopped being loyal to employees. ANYONE is a "flight risk" if they are dissatisfied in their job. Salary is one aspect ...
keshlam's user avatar
  • 68.7k
10 votes

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

Looking at this from a different angle... You've got applicants from the Bay Area applying and asking for more than you're willing to pay. Why are they living in the Bay Area but applying for a remote ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 377
7 votes

Reapplying with the same background but no hire because of background

It's good pay and I need the job, and I would like to go back to work there, but I don't feel like they're being fair telling me that I'm not being hired because of my background. I think that that's ...
nvoigt's user avatar
  • 141k
4 votes

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

If you are offering a salary around the national average (for the relevant responsibilities and experience) and you don't want to be regarded as offering on the low side, then you should only look at ...
Bart van Ingen Schenau's user avatar
4 votes

Reapplying with the same background but no hire because of background

Firstly: they can hire/not hire whoever they choose. You have zero proof of there being any discrimination so no you have no recourse. Now to address your suspicions: there are multiple things that ...
InBedded16's user avatar
  • 3,854
4 votes

Could I be blacklisted from applying to a company after submitting non-identical resumes?

If you are asking about most sane management chains, the answer is no. If your question is "should I worry", the answer is also clearly no. If you insist on any, there must be at least one ...
keshlam's user avatar
  • 68.7k
3 votes

Reapplying with the same background but no hire because of background

All that you were told after being terminated was that you could apply later, perhaps as a courtesy and path to the least amount of conflict/friction. That wasn't any guarantee that you'd be hired if ...
Xavier J's user avatar
  • 43.4k
3 votes

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

Based on personal experience with hiring and attrition: I would start with realistic expectations about employee loyalty and flight risk, and work from there: Anyone can leave any moment; Everyone ...
A.S's user avatar
  • 10.6k
2 votes

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

However, their salary expectations often exceed our budget. Despite this, many express willingness to consider our offered range if the company aligns with their values. Pay peanuts, get Monkeys. If ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
  • 34.8k
1 vote

How do you better evaluate a potential “flight risk”?

First and foremost, in the book Cracking the Coding Interview, the author recommends for job seekers to move on every three years. This advice is targeted to the California tech corridor. What kind ...
Pete B.'s user avatar
  • 10.8k

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