48

This bonus was something your company paid to you because they thought you should have the money. If the bonus was to be split, your company would have split it between the two of you and not left it to you to somehow share. Your company thinks you earned it. Otherwise you would not have the money. This bonus is for referral alone. It is not for helping the ...


28

It’s just the entire process of who owns the Referral bonus in this specific instance and should splitting the bonus or handing over the bonus to referree, where it was not agreed in advance, constitute the correct decision? Do referrer needs to make the referral that results in employment to technically deserve the referral bonus? The way referral bonuses ...


25

Stop trying to own your employees' personal lives. What they do outside the 8 hours a day you're paying them for is none of your business.


25

I'm going to attempt to answer this in a political neutral way. I don't believe these types of questions are specific to the far-right. There are certainly business owners who are equally cautious about those on the far-left. You will not find consensus on this issue. There are those that believe that holding certain political beliefs means you automatically ...


21

It is your company's policy to pay you for the referral. That money is yours, you own it once it's paid to you, and you can to do with it as you wish. If you decide before or after the process to share it, that is your decision to make. You could have said "no" to your ex-colleague and not given her anything, which would have been just fine. Either ...


17

I always thought they were considered a pro as employees train themselves. I am not a software manager but my understanding, at least where I have worked, is that side projects are viewed as a benefit as employees train themselves outside of work hours rather than requiring on the job training.


16

I am from India. You can very pointedly decline to share this information and tell them that apart from your contact details, resume and references, you will not share any other personal data. Many requiruiting firms around the world have a second business model of making money from selling your profiles to marketing companies and data brokering firms (...


15

I would say in general that this person's inability to keep these views to themselves during the hiring process is a strong indication, regardless of which side of the issue they are on, that they will bring them up, maybe repeatedly, in the office. I also think it shows lack of professional judgement on what's appropriate to discuss in a professional ...


11

Claim you can't find it or that the company said it was confidential. They are trying to lock your salary expectation down to a certain level and they want to know what you were paid there so they can set the salary range right from the start. Sharing it is very unlikely to benefit you.


11

There are lots of colleagues who will have to work with the person, and that is what you need to take into account. Plus future colleagues. For example, if you talk to a candidate and you think "we don't have any muslims as employees right now, but if we hire this person, then hiring a muslim would be a problem". If that's what you think, and you ...


11

Many people would add points for someone doing some other programming in their free time, showing they are interested. From time to time I have "donated" code that I've written in my spare time to the company, so they definitely benefit from that. Or I know solutions to problems from my private work. Other people just don't care what people do in ...


7

You're quoting a lot of numbers here, but you're not saying how you got there. I could pull a number out of my butt and say I'm worth a million bucks, but realistically nobody's going to pay me that, and I'm going to have to take a job that's significantly less than what I say I'm worth, if what I say I'm worth is a truly ridiculous number that I got ...


6

Referral bonuses are for the referring employee only, to incentivize people bringing good candidates to the company's attention. It is not customary and there is no expectation to split it with anyone. Of course the money is yours and you can do what you want with it, but this is pure charity, not fulfilling any professional expectation. You went above and ...


5

Best thing to do is to just clarify your mistake. If you don't and they find out (and if they contact the HR of that company they will find out), they might think you intentionally lied and your chances will be gone (and you might end up on their blacklist). If you just tell the truth that you made a mistake, they might not really care (everyone makes ...


5

I mostly agree with the previous answers, but there is an additional point I think needs to be considered. That is, what position is that person applying for? The OP said they learned about that person’s beliefs from events and social media and generally they keep their views out of the workplace. So for a regular office job, while their beliefs might be a ...


5

I think all existing answers are good, but thought I'd answer to make it clear why companies offer referrals and therefore who is expected to receive it. Hiring people is expensive and time-consuming; you either need to pay someone internal to do it (who may be a generalist and not able to target exactly the right groups) or you pay external recruiters to do ...


4

The referral bonus is intended for you alone. Your ex-colleague does not deserve it more than I, or other Workplace SE answerers, do. Additionally, I would be worried having recommended a person with such low ethics. She clearly manipulated you using shady psychological tactics. Be wary about her for the future.


4

The company awarded the money to you, there is nothing more to discuss. There is zero reason you should ever tell an acquaintance about such a windfall. Ouch, she felt entitled to money awarded to you and convinced you to feel the same way. Sadly, this is one of those situations where this applies: I can explain it to you, but I can't comprehend it for you....


4

Indian working in India, here. Most of the companies in India outsource candidate sourcing and set certain guidelines to these consultancies. Expected CTC limitations, notice period limitations, DOB or age limitations etc. And one of such guidelines is, PAN card details to ensure that they are not interviewing the same person, twice, for the same role, ...


3

No, you should not file a complaint against her. However, you should mention to her, calmly, that you did email her, repeatedly, to follow up about this job, and received no response, and that she should check her spam filters and/or trash bin to see if your messages got filtered. Spam filters work weirdly and are not always correct, and weird things ...


3

I'm a software leader, and I find individuals who don't have side projects to be a red flag. One of the most important qualities in an individual contributor is curiosity - fulfilling a need to know. Nothing screams curious like a public code repository jam packed with side projects of diverse topics and toolsets. For people working for you now, you don't ...


2

How can I find a job that pays me for the value that I bring? The only way to do this is to be self employed. When you work for or attempt to work for someone else, they will pay you no more than what they believe your value to the company is. It does not matter what you believe, all they are looking at is your previous experience and titles. If you want ...


2

I can't speak exactly on your situation; but, I saw this kind of comment a lot at a former employer. There it was often expressed by coworkers who wanted more money. They didn't want the risks of a new job or they believed (or had been told) that they would not get a raise in their current one (for whatever reason). They wanted their employer to suddenly ...


2

You shouldn't say "Why are you desperate to hire me?" but it seems like you could ask more indirect questions. There are a few scenarios for a company being desperate to hire: maybe a lot of people are leaving, they have a lot of new projects coming up/already started, or they have big expansion plans. Some good, some bad reasons. You could ask why ...


2

Not necessarily a red flag. If they've recognized that you're more technically skilled than their interview team, they might feel there's no point in further interviews and they should just jump to the hiring process. This is a fairly good sign; if you have confidence that you're a fit for the position, you should also have confidence that the interviewers ...


1

They have no obligation to email you, call you, interview you, consider your feelings, respect your time, or acknowledge you in any way. These things happen, for a variety of reasons. Let it go. This isn't a battle that needs to be fought.


1

As guiding rule - its not what you think you worth, its how much your can get paid on the market. Feeling of being underpaid is common ;) Most people strive to get as much as possible for as little as possible. In my experience, if you feel you worth a certain amount - first check the market rate for that salary and align your skills and personality to match....


1

Funny. Are you looking for professionals or slaves? Would you allow them to have families? Children? These also distracting


1

"There is 3 days between my first email and reminder email. It has passed 4 days without getting any reply". Yes send the reminder email and emphasize that it's a time sensitive matter.


1

Extreme worldviews are a risk that can lead to a toxic workplace environment and even violence: https://www.everbridge.com/blog/five-types-workplace-violence/ Some years ago I had a coworker who happened to be an extremist, and while he behaved perfectly professionally in front of the project managers, he was a bully in their backs. His behaviour impacted my ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible