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74

Just keep it simple and polite. Something like the following should do fine: Thank you for the opportunity you presented, accepting me for the interview. As a result of the interview, I understand that this particular job is not what I have in mind for my future professional development. Eventually (if it is the case) you might add: Please keep me ...


63

How can I possibly convince an employer to hire me despite the fact that I've never had a job before in my life? Consider this fact - every single one of us who is currently in a career had to find an answer to that question at some point in the past. There are literally billions of people out there in the world who overcame the obstacle of getting their ...


33

If you're really sure you won't be proceeding, the polite and professional thing to do is to tell them as quickly and unambiguously as possible, so they can disregard your application and focus their attention completely on any remaining candidates who are interested. Your first sentence is the signal. Just reword it, and you have your email: Thanks for ...


32

I think you have two very important questions to ask yourself right now: Do I want/need a job? It sounds like you're on the fence, and the tone of your question makes me think that you're leaning towards not having a job. No one can force you to want to have a job. What job do I want to get? That's going to make a huge difference. If you want to be the CEO ...


19

they are going to make me pay for the background check out of my first paycheck if I am hired. Is this a normal practice? It's not common in my experience in the US. I have never had to pay for a background check. Nor has any company where I have worked required new hires to reimburse the cost of background checks. But I've always worked in the software ...


18

If you really need a job, just find it. I don't see any problem with 33 especially in IT moreover with CS degree. There are hundreds of jobs where the only thing you need is to be alive. If you're still reading this, let me tell you a motivational story. A guy 26 years old moved to another country far from his homeland. He barely knew the language. He was ...


15

Could someone please give me their opinions on this case. In my opinion, you don't have this job yet. And since they haven't managed to get feedback from the VP for more than two months, you may never get this job. If I were you, I'd continue the job search. If a formal offer ever arrives, you can decide what you would like to do at that time.


13

You roughly have two options: Thanks for the interest, but this role isn't for me. Thanks for the interest, but this role isn't for me. The fact is. I really wanted to work directly for you guys, but I was disappointed to learn that this position was only available through an intermediary agency. Option #1 is short and sweet. Use your own words if ...


12

I just needed to have a degree, so I could show SOMETHING to an employer. Cool, this was a great idea as it shows that: you have the intelligence to complete a degree you have the commitment to complete a degree you have some basic transferable skills I would prefer to hide it just so I don't get asked to do IT work. Wait, what? This sounds like you ...


11

Whether you take the job or not makes a huge difference to the recruitement agency. They get paid, or they get not paid. The payment may be dependent on the salary, but that is a very minor amount to them. So the motivation of the recruitement agency is to do anything to make the company offer you the job and to make you accept the job. So if the ...


9

If they contact you again either to schedule another interview, or to send them references, then you should tell them that you are no longer interested. I prefer to send this message via email. It lets me control the length of the conversation, and it gives me time to come up with the exact phrases I want to use. You don't have to provide a lot of ...


7

(ASSUUMING USA) SOURCE: PERSONAL EXPERIENCE I would reach out to your local Vocational Rehabilitation office for some insights, and any charities for specific groups, such as the deaf, the blind, autistic, et cetera. These people specifically can help you craft questions, as well as give you a steady stream of potential candidates, and what ...


6

The good news is that in the current US economy, if you are in a mid-sized to large city, you can find a job that doesn't require any experience or a prior work background. The bad news is that almost all such jobs will pay minimum wage, and most of them will be boring and possibly unpleasant. Convenience store clerk, sport stadium vendor, and warehouse work ...


6

The manager informed me that he will give me the contract after getting signature from Vice president. Great, at which point you thank them, and then continue the job search. Until you have something delivered to you in writing, you don't have a job offer. It has been more than 2 months the vice president didn't sign and whenever I ask the manager ...


5

My first internship was in an HR department. I used to scan resumes into the database all day. And yes, we didn't like it when people called to get the name of the hiring manager. That being said, when a resume was forwarded to us by a hiring manager, that automatically gave the resume more priority. We didn't want to be accused of losing a resume, or ...


5

tl;dr It sounds like you don't want to enter the workforce. Your concern about age is nothing more than smoke and mirrors. I highly suggest that you either ask a new question of "How to motivate myself to get employed?" or stay unemployed. Programmers don't get left in utility closets like gremlins of yesteryear; they are an integral part of a business's ...


5

You asked, what approaches should I adopt in addition to, or differently from, what's typically used so that I can maximize both fairness as well as my company's interests I think the answer to that is basically "nothing." Do nothing differently from what's typically done. In other words, follow the typical process: determine what skills you need, and ...


4

Depends on the place you're working at. My expectation is that a very large company would be able to absorb the cost of the background/drug tests. On the flip side, a very small company, such as a small family owned shop, would need to pay for the background services and may ask employees to absorb the cost. It may also be indicative of a very high turn over ...


4

It's perfectly acceptable to simply address the cover letter to "Hiring Manager" rather than using a name. If you have the name, then use it, but don't go out of your way to get it. See Alison's answer on this. HorusKol's comment is right on: To whom it may concern" is a good choice.


3

In my career I follow one rule - always ask more than you have had before. Because you got more experience, more knowledge etc. Also I often ask 10%-15% more than I really "cost" because I want to have a buffer for salary negotiations. Don't worry your employer also does the same trick. In your current situation I would ask for 750000 INR since your ...


3

Interviewing is a two way street. Your best bet is to ask a lot of well thought out questions that give you the data information you need. Make a prioritized list of all the stuff that's important to you: compensation, commute, culture, benefits, technology, work hours, growth paths (money, skills & career), business outlook, location(s), etc. That's ...


3

This may vary from industry to industry, example: in software, 16 days is just too long. You are right, the attendance is thin around the holiday season, but that's all more reason to have this wrapped up early (before the holiday begins). Anyways, if you're not done it already, send an e-mail to follow up about the next steps. Since the holidays are ...


3

When you are dead you are to late to get a job. All other ages, barring laws on child labor, are perfectly able and fine to get a job. Now, what kind of job, how to find one and get it are a different things. Try to remember that jobs are temporary ways to gain income. They can change, and often are the best way to get more of what you actually want. Be ...


2

Since you only have to pay for it if you get the job you might as well not worry about it. Whether it's normal or not, if you argue with the employer over this, you risk losing your chance at getting the job. So what if you lose $100, or whatever it is, if in return you are getting a job which should hopefully pay you at least twice that per day. As to ...


2

You have some misconceptions. Most places don't ask for or read cover letters these days. Also, they don't want you to know the hiring manager's name because they don't want you pestering them directly. They post a job, 300 people apply, if those applying knew the hiring manager's name they would be flooded with messages from company email and Linkedin. They ...


2

Playing the game the HR way is at best a crapshoot. HR is where resumes go to die. Yes, the above responses are correct in that attempting to get the hiring manager for a listed position is not going to happen (in most cases). I'm just a plain old full-stack developer. I was laid off from my previous two positions. I am now 63 so I wasn't going to ...


2

One important thing is missing from the opening question and this is what the person is interested in doing. OP mentioned a degree in IT, where getting a job is currently exceedingly easy, even with zero experience. But of course, the more you put on the table, such as experience and qualification, the better you can select your employer. This also means ...


2

Sorry, but this question is striking me the wrong way right up front: I just turned 33 and have never had a job before, due to factors outside my control. ... uh, what? Are you telling me that you haven't had any control over your life, at all, up until this point? That you were physically prevented from getting a paper route as a teen, a job as a ...


2

I just turned 33 and have never had a job before, due to factors outside my control. That should be more specific in the cover letter - anything from family reasons, work permit, even medical reasons are IMHO better than nothing. I have nothing to show on my resume, despite my age. You have a degree. I just finished a degree in programming, but ...


2

I've been a factory worker for 5 years. I just turned 30. Your are only 3 years older than me. I was just hired on my first programming job 4 months ago. As long as you are breathing, don't give up. I had this quote in my mind when I was on factory. It may sounds corny but here it is. "If pople don't give you experience, then give yourself experience". I don'...


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