136

I'm developer in your shoes and I had the added challenge of not having done any kind of computing type work before my current job as a Technical Lead at my company. With age comes experience, so often as an "older", I use this term very loosely, developer you bring different skills and competencies to the table. A couple things to note: Leverage your work ...


77

Not rude at all. It would be slightly different if you'd applied in the immediate past, but as it was the recruiter who contacted you this time, you're more than entitled to say "thanks, but no thanks". Just say what you said here - that you wouldn't be able to do justice to both your degree and the interview - and no bridges will be burnt.


31

People turn down opportunities all the time. The recruiter isn't going to give it a moments thought. They'll move onto another candidate. Politely decline and thank them for their time.


30

Unless you draw unusual particular attention to your online name, it isn't going to harm you. For example, don't show up at an interview with a t-shirt saying "I am Overlord Dragon". And don't use phrases like "we humans" during an interview. You won't appear "less controllable" solely due to your online name. You'll only appear that way if you act that ...


27

I feel inclined to reply as a fellow Georgia Tech Yellow Jacket. I did one of these interviews, it involved a two-week bender abusing my ADD medications and studying probably 20 hours a day to prepare for a startup interview. I nailed the interview, but it was awful for my every aspect of my health imaginable (mental, social, emotional, physical). The best ...


20

What issues could this raise for me? You are right to be concerned, this could cause you some pain down the road for the exact reasons you spelled out in your question. What I would do is send an email and a certified letter to the Corporate Office HQ where the HR head resides and confirm your departure date. If you provided a letter when your resigned, ...


15

What can I do to improve my chances to be hired? Your best bet is to obtain some sort of certification, in whatever part of the technology field that interests you, so that you have some talking points and credibility when seeking interviews. This could help you get your foot in the door, or at least help you obtain an interview. Be vigilant as I ...


13

Too many "it depends". "My kids don't need school collection" is far, far better than some of the excuses I've heard from e.g. unemployed truck drivers (what they've realised is good hours, easy work, great money). What did you do before this (IT epiphany)? Was it a specific business / business domain? You'll have more success looking for IT in that - ...


12

Get into I.T. as a Software Tester For reference, I am a software developer, architect and I.T. manager with over 20 years experience. Your main challenge entering the market "late" is that kids in their 20's have completed a 4 year degree and will be on the same level (of computer science and software development) as you, or even ahead of you. You might ...


11

1) Should I give the associate my SSN or is this a concerning situation? I would clarify what your SSN will be used for. But generally you don't need to provide your SSN until you need to verify your eligibility to work. 2) Can I still negotiate the terms of my contract once beginning on-boarding or is this something done before on-boarding? I find the ...


10

IMHO, NO Recruiter don`t need candidate SSN for anything during the service or after. Anything useful for you anyway. Contract negotiations should be done prior to contract signing, and "On Boarding" you describe seem to me like regular client profile building inside the recruiting company. I don`t want to be crude, but imho, there is no job, associate ...


10

I am in a bad situation Yes... it perhaps isn't quite as bad as all that. I know now that I will have discrepancies between listed job titles and actual ones. There are good reasons for that. I'm not going to lie and I hate to be harsh but that's not great. Fundamentally you lied on your CV and that's never good, it can bite you in the behind and it can ...


9

Regarding (1): As someone who's been involved in reviewing, interviewing and hiring applicants in IT (developers): If you put this information forward and make sure I know it's important to you, finding "Antitheist Gnostic Atheist" at the top of your Twitter feed and seeing questions like this on SE will certainly make me wonder about both your perspective ...


8

It entirely depends on the employer, many will take notice. More sophisticated employers will definitely include it as part of the data considered when looking for new team members. You should always choose the more academically rigorous and acclaimed path if you can. Part-time programs could be a good option if you need extra time for things like caring ...


7

Do not trust this recruiter. They do not have your best interest in mind. Ghost them. As a recruiter myself that should have never taken place. They are invested in their own self interest at this point.


6

In the US, unless you need accommodations for the interview itself, you don't mention the disability up front. You want them to consider you the best choice and be a bit invested in getting you, before they know accommodations will be needed. And this is in a country that DOES have laws against discrimination. So yes, I think you should try to get as far ...


6

I would suggest two things: Clearly state your target salary at the start Know the current market salary so you don’t price yourself out of range. If your target is in the range of the market salary then this strategy should work. This somewhat assumes that your actual salary is lower than the market salary, but that seems to be the point...


6

No one can know specifically why in your case, but my guess is that they've decided it's unnecessary. Every time I have been interviewed by HR, it's been a pre-screen that has covered things like: willingness to relocate, general information about the position and company, high-level compatibility check, and basically checking any other deal-breakers to ...


5

Your undergraduate university and major are good determinants of your first job post graduation. Employers generally have target schools for various reasons - academic rigor, regional affiliations, research collaborations, etc., so you will be exposed to better/different opportunities depending on the school you attend (you can easily research this aspect at ...


5

Sounding too excited may come across as being too much about your desires and not about the companies needs. I would say something like "I am well aware that this position could(would) involve travel and that is not a problem for me at all". If they ask about your travel experience after that, you could go into more detail to show that you can easily ...


5

Do not give this recruiter any of your personal details! I would let the recruiter know that you would like to pick up the paperwork in person. If they agree, then verify that the address you are going to is actually the address of the company that you believe you are interviewing for. If the recruiter refuses then look for another opportunity. If the ...


4

You could do an Open University Degree and then apply for a graduate level position when you've completed it or you feel that you've gathered enough knowledge from it. The Open University courses next start dates are October 2019, registration needs to be done by mid-September to catch this start date. There are some great course options which will lead to ...


3

I think you're over analyzing things. From your post: The recruiter is asking me when I plan on sending out job applications next summer, so they can "check back in" with me. I'd just answer them, simply, by saying something like this: I'll probably start applying for jobs during months XX-XX 2020. Keep it short and sweet. And if the recruiter doesn'...


3

I suggest you contact HR directly and check that the date you were terminated (finished) is that which you expect. If they have changed the date by extending it, then you should be paid for that time :) So, hopefully this should be clarified and sorted.


2

I just thought this would be too much for a comment, so I'm prepared to get some downvotes as this might come off a bit negative (not the intention, just to prepare you and I'm a huge pessimist & cynic). I'm just in my thirties and bordering into Senior level in my field and I feel I can tell a lot about working software (I'm careful with that, senior ...


2

One answer related to this from my observations in the US: By the time all this happens, I'll be in my mid-40's. With all the people coming out of university year after year with similar qualifications to what I will have, how likely are employers going to choose me over one of them? The is a lot of age discrimination in the sector in the US. The UK will ...


2

Get good at solving poorly-defined problems and fixing bugs I have been hiring later-in-life software developers for a few years now and one of their biggest strengths can be their ability to handle poorly-defined problems. While it varies from course to course, folks whose experience is largely academic at the undergraduate level can be very skilled at ...


2

Highlight the pluses of you current situation and sell them as a reason to your low salary. Make clear to the recruiters that you accepted a lower salary because of the outstanding work/life balance (maybe borderline lie...), when they play the lowball card ask about work/life balance at the new workplace and ask that they put it in writing, then downplay ...


2

As someone who has hired a good many developers in the different companies I've worked at, I'd honestly say the best thing you can do to improve your chances is be humble. Go for junior positions and realise that your years of hobby experience without a team (and code review) have probably led to same bad habits and that you probably "don't know that you ...


2

My personal situation is that my father is self-employed and therefore took me and my brothers and sisters on business trips abroad from when we were young. So do you think one should mention trips like that? It would make complete sense to indicate that you have seen up close what travel for business is like, and to relate how your father took you ...


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