13

No offence, but this seems like sour grapes. You did some good work for free which convinced them they need to fill a position, but they didn't quietly offer it to you. There may be many reasons for this including thinking that they're taking your valuable time. But you've reached the conclusion it's nepotism and are listing the candidates shortcomings in ...


8

when feedback is asked automatically via an email, about an interview and/or hiring process without getting a formal rejection nor offer, is this typically a sign that another candidate has been chosen for the position? No. It's not a sign that another candidate has been chosen. And it's not a sign that you have been chosen. It's a sign that their automated ...


5

Is reaching out to the hiring manager over LinkedIn a good idea in this situation? No. A recruiting agency insulates a company from the day-to-day-to-day details and significant effort involved in hiring. Companies want to interview good candidates, and have a single point of contact (the recruiter) to handle all the communication and logistics. If you ...


4

First off Should I wait or start looking for other opportunities You should never have stopped. A job search doesn't end until both parties (you and the company) signed a legally binding contract. It is in your interest to pursue multiple job opportunities, so that you maximize your chances of getting a job. All these steps took 3 days after the Nov 2nd ...


4

You want to put a technical filter question in? But you're worried that the applications will copy/paste the answer? The solution's simple: create a technical question that doesn't have an easily-found online solution. I mean, geez - you don't have to literally do Fizz-Buzz exactly. It's just meant to be a simple, easy-to-do programming task. Just make ...


4

In my experience, if there is a discrepancy, the company will reach out directly to discuss. I've had that happen a couple of times - once when the omission was mine and once when they tried to contact a university I had never attended (or said I attended). No harm in getting ahead of the situation and letting HR know, but I doubt if this will be turn out to ...


3

It is perfectly OK and normal for you to email directly on the understanding that you're coming via recruiter SuperStaff Inc. Hence, your email would say: Hi Steve, enjoyed our interview Monday. This is John McFat, Jake at SuperStaff connected us. Any next steps? I'm very keen to blah blah. It's that easy - no big deal. Recruiters are a dumpster fire. ...


3

I mean, I would ask about the reviews. But I would've asked a lot earlier in the process. Like immediately. I suggest framing it like you don't want to focus on any specific details, but generally you have seen a trend towards a certain type of comment. Ask them if they're aware of their comments and give them a chance to respond. You should also ask them ...


3

Regarding the company review on internet: no one here can confirm or deny anything, you need to make your own judgement call. Regarding the other three questions: It says offer is given I join before said date, which I know will be impossible given my notice period which I haven't served yet. Get in touch with them and point them the fact. Ask them to ...


2

You ask if you should keep searching. As a general rule, until you have an official offer with your and their autograph under it, yes, you should keep searching. Even if they get back to you tomorrow, their offer might simply not be good enough. Or it might be good enough, but only because you didn't get an even better offer due to not searching further.


1

I think it's hard(maybe impossible, as I tried it for few years) to become a senior developer... I like to have developer teams that I can telling them about my ideas and what products I need, then they will creat it perfectly Sounds like you actually want to be a CEO. There are CEOs who got there by just being good at raising funds. And others who were ...


1

If you want to get a new job, then you don't stop looking until the offer letter is signed and returned and all preconditions have been met. Some people continue looking until the day before they start just in case they lose the contract, the boss quits, or the economy craters. It doesn't matter how positive they seem, or how excited they are, or how much ...


1

How was anyone at the sister division supposed to know that you even wanted to change jobs? Secondly, it might be unethical or damage relationships between managers for them to try and poach you from your current job. It's not unusual for people to get jobs based on connections. Even if they let you apply for the job they could then find any of 100 reasons ...


1

Public position announcements (and tenders) are a good thing, but there are always ways around them. Anecdote: the gov't of some country issued an invitation to tender for politicians' (chauffeured) cars, where they specified wheel base at least this much, weight at most this much and something about the engine, fuel efficiency, etc. As a result, only a ...


1

Here are three options: http://interviewing.io It records the shared code editor and the audio for later review, but it requires you to participate in the technical interview itself. http://triplebytes.com They do the remote technical pre-screening for you. It's all automated. The drawback is that they're super expensive since they expect a commission on ...


1

I think you're missing an important point: the "cost" of completing your pre-screen is easily paid, and is going to be a factor in determining who applies. The question is not, "Should we do this or some other, less time-consuming, screen?" The question is rather "How many responses will we get, of what quality, if we use these two ...


1

Ask for something simple in the relevant technical area. I have an alternative solution. Say you want to hire a Django developer. Maybe ask them to publish a Django site that displays their name and prints their name to the console. Maybe you ask for an open API that when called displays their name. Depends on what you need. They can push it to Azure or some ...


1

I wouldn't worry about the issue. If you were engaged in training with a company for two months - assuming the training is either full-time or at least a substantial time commitment - then I think it's perfectly reasonable to declare the start of that training as the start of your time with the company. If your new employer asks for clarification about the ...


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