New answers tagged

-1

Certainly you should always be on the lookout for scams, but a scam that offers you a job is one most people would be willing to live with. I'm not sure how a job interview scam would end up with your money, but I wouldn't give personally identifiable information to anyone I didn't know.


7

The phone interview is scheduled Monday, but I would like to clarify this before talking to this "recruiter". I think it's safe to attend the meeting to get more details to be able to really tell if it's fake or not. That would be better than trying to guess if this is fake or not, and miss a good offer because you got perhaps a little paranoid. Again, ...


6

With respect, this is your first Australian work visa. It is probably your employer's 20th. They undoubtedly know what to expect. Talk to your hiring manager or the HR people. Let them know your situation and ask for advice. Keep in touch with them. Please, please, trust that they really want you. Trust that they'll help you through this.


5

is it ok to kindly refuse the offer in my circumstance You can, but remember that the company has spent resources and time on this, so you're not the only one that takes a loss. Having said that, you need to support yourself/family, they will understand. Before doing that I suggest you discuss options including giving up the offer with the company.


1

What do you gain by refusing the offer? If you find another job you want to take in the meantime or your plans definitely change then by all means let them know. Otherwise, you may as well leave it open and see what happens.


0

Remote paid entry position is hard to justify. However, pure equity based remote positions are abundant. Lots of non technical people have an idea but no money to implement it. There are ton of those online. Work for them, your title could be something like CTO. You won’t get paid most likely work for free at your own cost but easy to find such job. Under ...


-1

Is there any possibility to find internships where I can work from home? Remote internships are extremely rare to find, because typically interns are similar to entry-level employees that benefit from face to face interaction and adhoc training. If you really cannot locate and your town is just a college town, consider working for the university you attend.


9

My question is: why on earth would you oppose this? I mean, let's take it for granted that you want this job, and that all of this makes sense. So why on earth wouldn't you want to take the test for the third time? At this point, you should be able to blow that test out of the water! I mean, heck, if I was interviewing at a software firm for the third ...


6

What does it bring to their recruiting process to make a candidate take the same test three times versus twice in a period of less than a year? It could be a corporate requirement to have all candidates take a coding test. Each time you reapply, you become a new candidate. Side note: some companies also enforce that you cannot apply to the same position ...


-3

I have no idea dude, why don't you ask them? If they don't tell you, then you can I suppose refuse the job on principle. If it's the same test, don't you have the answers somewhere? Why is it even a bother to take the same test that you've already passed twice a third time?


2

Abusive employers exist, and a HR department knows that. I imagine they may even have a well defined way to handle that. If the alternative is canceling the application, I would certainly just be straight forward and honestly explain the situation. You can be totally relaxed with that, because it will not create any problem in itself. The outcome can be ...


1

I like going through recruiters rather than company websites for a few reasons: 1) Recruiters are expected to have personal relationships with the companies they represent. If you apply through a recruiter and your application is stalled out, you can follow up with the recruiter and expect the recruiter to follow up with the company to get your resume/...


0

Speaking from my one and only personal experience. I was recently contacted by a recruiter on Stack Overflow about an opportunity to work in another country. I wasnt the one paying for his work, but even so he called me several times to prepare me for the inteview and to keep me updated. This is how things went, and why i seriously consider this kind of ...


6

Mine will be kind of a non-answer, but, you say this new opportunity will be a great boost to your career, and of course, you're the best judge of that, but to me, it sounds like they are, or at the very least their HR department is, highly unprofessional. Who, in their right mind, heard about a prospecting employer getting in touch with your current one?! ...


-2

Apply direct is my advice, because the lack of fee may sway the job in your favour, also I have had agencies said they represented me when they didn't, they do that so their other candidates have less competition. I have actually secured interviews by following up with the employer. Don't trust agencies, they are pricks. They also beat you down on your ...


0

The recruitment agency represents the employer not the candidate. They are paid by employers to find and filter candidates. I know they will try and act like they represent you but they don't (IMO). Some of them will ask you to sign their terms and agree to only apply for positions though them. - where I live this has no legal standing. However you should ...


8

A good recruiter will prep you I have worked with recruiters who knew the interview questions in advance (including the technical ones), knew how the job description differed from what the hiring manager wanted, and knew that anyone they handed in would likely get an interview in comparison to the dark hole of the online application website. But it ...


0

The recruiter may get a one-time fee of 20% of your annual salary if they represent you. But you won't be paying them a dime-- that's a fee they charge to the hiring company. And realistically you're not going to be able to get the hiring company to give you that 20% as a bonus if you apply directly. At a minimum, that money is coming out of a totally ...


61

Don't provide a solution, just provide the constraints. You're one step ahead, but in the wrong direction. You don't have to provide a solution to their request. Just let them know of the problem. Tell HR about your current boss and that your current employer is not aware of you seeking a job elsewhere. Be careful to not call your current boss abusive, but ...


0

Have HR in your new company contact HR in your current company, instead of contacting the manager directly. This is generally how it should work anyway - communications about employment matters should be channelled through HR. HR at your current place then request a reference from your manager, who passes it back to HR. When I've written references for ...


1

If your current manager has told more than one person, maybe those people can be used as references and also to explain what is going on and why you are leaving. Considering what a predicament you are in, the new employer should be willing to listen to these people. I would write an email to them and say just that, you are in a predicament and you trying to ...


17

You don't have to withdraw, but you have to be open with the hiring manager, explaining the situation like you did here. Hopefully, they will not go against your wishes. You are in academia. Perhaps you have collaborators that are on the same professional level as your current boss, and they can vouch for you.


189

You don't have to withdraw your application. You can explain the situation as is, or just make it clear that you would not like them to contact your current employer. Simple: I'm sorry, I have not announced my intention to leave and it would greatly worsen my relationship with my boss if you were to contact them for a reference. If a reference from my ...


208

Talk to the hiring manager of the new place. Make sure that they're aware of the sensitivity of the situation. If there is another manager at your company that they can talk to, give their name also. If you're the person that the hiring manager wants for the position, they'll find a way around this problem - you won't be the first case that they'll have come ...


4

Should I ask about my application status before sharing the documents? Yes, obviously. You need to ensure that you are in touch with the correct point of contact and not being scammed somehow. Do not share any personal information until you can confirm that it is about a legit job offer and not a scam. what is a suitable way to ask them? Be direct and ...


4

Unless you were fired for misconduct or security policy violation, I believe that information is not relevant to your future employer now. They interviewed you and you cleared and accepted the job offer. They may only need to check your working tenure with your previous organization, nothing more. If the current employer would not have terminated your ...


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