New answers tagged

5

When applying to software development jobs in Montreal, is it best to use an English resume, French one, or to include both versions? If you see the ad in other language than English, or the job posting mentions the requirement of knowing other languages that English and you happen to be comfortable / proficient in that language, why not attach both the ...


6

Match the first language in the job ad I haven’t lived in Montreal, but I have interviewed for software jobs there. As a rule, a place seems to primarily English if the English comes first in the job ad. They didn’t ask if I spoke French. It always came up when the French came first. Or, if you have solid proficiency in both languages, check which one is ...


43

You've received several good answers, but I feel there is an important point that hasn't been emphasized enough. Hiring managers are generally looking for individuals with the skills to complete job tasks, but also for individuals who will be happy, productive, and (ideally) long-term team members. That's hard to ask directly about in an interview, so ...


3

If you have access to a copy of the company's employee handbook (or similar document), you may want to review it to see if there is any policy regarding rehires. Some companies won't rehire as a general policy, some will rehire as long as you weren't fired or forced to resign, and some might not care at all. An employer of mine had a paragraph dictating that ...


60

I'm wondering should I even bother? Do HRs have some sort of employee blacklist? It's unlikely that you are on a blacklist, but certainly both HR and the hiring manager will know that a year ago you left your 2-month stint. Just be sure to have an excellent answer to the inevitable question of "why did you leave us before?" Make sure your answer is clear,...


23

Apply. They'll notice your stint on your resume as soon as they glance at your resume anyway. Let them make the decision. At one company I was at, one Vice President was famous for driving away his underlings, and no one blamed his underlings for quitting. In fact in that specific case, surviving more than one week under him was seen as a net positive by ...


5

I've seen people quit and rejoin the same organization (even the same division) many times, unless you were fired for any breach of contract, in general no one holds grudges for leaving the company. As you mentioned, last time you were dissatisfied with your boss, not the overall company policy and/or work culture - so I do not see any downside in applying ...


138

What’s the downside of applying again? If you apply and get declined, the end result is you wouldn’t work there. If you don’t apply, you also would end up not working there.


8

It depends on the nature of the "glitch". You say that the issue was with the nature of the client's business. Was this issue something that should have been obvious to you had you done a bit of research on the company before showing up? Or was it something that you realistically might not have understood prior to the interview? If I'm interviewer for, ...


2

If I were a hiring manager, I wouldn't be angry with the candidate if they're upfront and honest in saying so. I would say, "That's alright - this job isn't for everyone, and I respect your honesty in saying so. Let's end the interview here." I would also contact the agent and say, "I just had a candidate end an interview because they had doubts about the ...


0

Offering a differing opinion here. I would not advise ever just walking out of an interview. Some people will take offense. I've seen it happen, and you've experienced it. Complete the interview unless there are extraordinary circumstances that justify you ending it. There are some people who will take offense if you end the interview prematurely, as ...


3

Would you be offended if a candidate said, “No thanks, I don't want to waste any more of your time”? No, not at all, rather I'll thank the candidate for their attempt to not to cause any further damage than what is already done. As other answers suggested, being careful about the job post, nature and other applicable terms and conditions is the best way to ...


2

I guess this question is for hiring managers: Would you be offended if a candidate said, “No thanks, I don't want to waste any more of your time”? I value my time and I appreciate those who don't want to waste it. Thus, I most likely wouldn't be angry with the candidate. I might be furious with the agency and perhaps the agent - which is what I expect ...


13

You did the right thing as long as you told the interviewing company as soon as you realised the mismatch, and explained there has been a miscommunication. The interviewing company probably weren't angry at you directly (a reasonable person wouldn't), but they almost certainly were unhappy with the agent who sent a mismatched candidate. But that's not your ...


1

Ethics: You are ethically bound to be honest (in most situations), and if you agreed to work for someone then that's what you must do. However, there is nothing wrong with going for an interview unless you said that you would not do that. If something happens to stop you attending the first job, you might be able to proceed with the second and avoid ...


-2

You don't owe loyalty to a company ever. That's a myth the elites have propagated to create a servant class.


4

they said due to their policy being to not disclose this They genuinely said that their policy is not to tell a candidate how much they will be paid?! A reasonable answer to that is "I can't tell you how many days a week I'll work for you if you can't tell me how much you're paying". It does not have to be all in the same letter - they can write the ...


4

Simply put your agreed salary in writing to them. Say that you will join then subject to them paying a salary of xxxxxx. That way you are covered. Basic terms would usually be sent in an offer letter but there's nothing to stop you saying your accepting the offer based on certain conditions, it is a two way process and they don't get to call the shots.


55

So is this offer letter legally correct or not? It doesn't matter. You should walk away even if it is legal. It's already a big red flag in terms of professionalism to not by default include salary in an offer letter. But to outright refuse when pressed? You're 100% in not-legitimate territory here. There's simply no reason why this would be their policy ...


13

In the future, do not accept an offer until you've seen the written contract (and possibly the employee manual if the contract refers to it in any way). In the meantime, proceed as if you don't have a contract yet, because you don't. Keep on interviewing with other places. Do not stop. Do not slow down. If currently employed, do not quit until you have ...


9

Agree, looks super fishy. If you have a choice, leave this company in your tracks and don't look back. On the other hand, if you have nothing to lose and have NO other options, go to your first day and see if they going to scam you and for how much. Don't sign anything binding and be prepared to walk away. P.S. Please keep us posted.


18

Simply point out that you cannot consider leaving your existing position until you have the received and reviewed the full details of what they are offering, including any terms or agreements they expect you to sign.


27

A job-offer letter is just a contract where you say "I promise to work for you" and the other parties say "in return I promise the following things..." That is all it is. You could have a job offer that says "I promise to come and drink your coffee once a week" and "In return we promise to loudly yell insults" This job offer would be both legal and ...


141

[....] the salary annexure and appointment letter will be issued on your joining. So, basically you're expected to accept an offer and join the work without having any written proof of appointment and confirmed agreement on your payout? Anything which is not a part of written agreement from proper authority, is not part of any agreement, at all. If I ...


2

If you are only interested in cyber security jobs, and this is not one, simply call the person of contact, explain your position, and cancel the interview if necessary. If you found an open, entry-level cyber security position on their website, ask if you can instead interview for that position. If you haven't found such a position on their website, ask ...


3

You should get in touch with your point in contact and explain that you think you'd be a better fit for their other role, which is advertised, and you wonder if it's still available. They will let you know whether it's still available or not and if you can actually interview for that position. Make sure you clearly mention the following: Why you prefer the ...


0

I do not know your location but in the US they contact your previous managers to see if you worked where you claimed you did. You can say "I no longer have contact info with my manager from 10 years ago, but here is the contact info to the company's HR." When contacted managers often will only verify if you worked there. Of course from a phone call you ...


9

If the goal here is to get rehired - do nothing. You would be wasting your time. You weren't employed there long enough and weren't dismissed for an "automatically unfair" reason so you cannot challenge the dismissal. It sucks, I get that - but there's simply no legal basis to challenge this on and you've already been through their internal processes (twice)...


2

You're right - your personality and general competency can probably be gleaned through a series of interviews. However, one of the most important parts of a reference is confirmation that you worked at the company you claimed, performing the role and responsibilities you outlined, and during the period you stated, on your application or resume. While it ...


7

I am rejecting this idea NOT because I can't provide the reference, but because it is against what I believe is right. We each have the ability to stand up for what we believe is right and what we believe is important. Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? ...


11

Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? In my view, yes. Reference checks can help fill out a sense of how a candidate is as an employee, how they fit in the wider picture of the company rather than just "can they do skilled task x". It's a lot easier for someone to ...


17

I believe if the company had a proper hiring procedure, they should have a clear idea about my competencies within the 3 interviews they have conducted face 2 face. I've hired more than 300 people (mostly software engineers of different seniority, UX, researchers, project managers). And there is no hiring procedure good enough to understand how somebody ...


2

Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? In my experience, reference checks are common in the IT sector, but not from a fixed person (Manager). In this case, rather than providing contact information of the manager, I would provide that of the HR so that they could ...


16

Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? Yes, you are. Reference check is common. The references are not really to check on your technical competencies, rather to check on your background and behavioral aspects. Through the interview process They don't know how you ...


2

I understand it could just be a company process Almost certainly is. "Stay positive and keep them on side until we've decided" is likely the name of the game here. They don't want a potential candidate getting cold feet and walking away if they can help it. The reverse is also true - you should also stay positive, enthusiastic and on-side until (unless) ...


5

I understand it could just be a company process. It may be a company process, it may not be. It can be just that individual trying to build network, which is OK and not uncommon. Do not read too much into it, just let it be. Do recruiters check every candidate's LinkedIn during the hiring process? While I cannot say it's a standard, checking a ...


0

You can tell them in the most general terms, but you don't have to name the other company. It's just like when a stranger you've just struck up a conversation asks where you live. You give them a general answer, but not your exact address (even if they keep on asking for a more detailed location). Call it healthy paranoia or a healthy boundary. But if ...


1

If Company B decides to hire someone else instead of you, should they tell you who they hired and what made them hire that person?


0

Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? Yes, you can tell them where & why you want to go. This shall lead to a healthy conversation about why you decided to go and maybe your present employer can come up with a new offer to retain you. Or it will also help the present employer decide actions for future cases. Is there any harm to letting ...


2

Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? If he asks: sure, why not? I liked the recruiter for Company B, so I'm willing to talk to him. As it happens I told him I was going to Company A because their product, and therefore what I'd be working on, better aligned with my interests. I'd tell anyone that, even a bunch of unknown people on the ...


6

Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? No, it's none of their business. Information is valuable, you don't give it out without a clear reason and idea of how it will benefit you. Additionally you would be giving away information that involves your employer to another company.


4

I wouldn't tell them where, but telling them why may help them. If they're honest about wanting to know why so that they can address their deficiencies then that certainly can't do any harm.


2

Yes, reach out to the HR about the update. In my opinion, the best time to do that was yesterday, do it as soon as possible. As a professional, you need to know how to follow up things / activities. Consider this as a part of your training.


0

Yes, of course, since you are interested in becoming a full time employee, you should ask about the test.


-1

With the caveat that customs and contracts vary by location, I need to go one step past yes. You should keep interviewing until you've landed where you're landing for the foreseeable future. Finding and starting a new job implies a settling down period. No reasonable company can expect that all applicants are ONLY talking with them. So at minimum, just ...


3

No, it's not unethical until your seat is firmly planted behind the desk at the new job. I've seen 11th hour retractions of offers, you owe the companies nothing until you are actually an employee


3

You asked, should I continue interviewing after verbally accepting an offer? And you made a good point when you said, I've been reading up and it seems like a verbal offer isn't really an offer until it's a contract Ultimately, in a black and white world, that's basically true. Until you have a signed contract, you should continue to pursue options. ...


22

Yes, not only that, but recommended. The advise on pretty much all questions on this site (over and over) is: Don't change what you're doing until you have a signed contract in your hand. I.e. A verbal offer is only worth a strangers-word and is not concrete. Until they have sent that contract to you and it has been signed, everything is still up in the ...


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