New answers tagged

3

Company A says their range would be 120 to 140, so you can expect 130. Company B offers 175. That's a huge difference. But then A is your "dream company". Think very hard about what makes them your "dream company". One third more salary would make B my dream company in a heartbeat.


4

This is going to come off as extremely cynical and crass, but so be it. The fact of the matter is that companies play by their own rules, and you should too. If you mess up at work or you don't fit into the company politics or whatever, the company won't hesitate to fire you for whatever reason (especially in SF which is in a right-to-work state where there ...


-2

Maybe at a technology driven company You have to remember the kind of company Stack Overflow is. Stack Overflow is a software engineering company absolutely filled with software engineers and other technical people. It sells products and services almost exclusively to other technical people. Even on The Workplace, 80% of people here are software engineers, ...


6

is this good to include in the resume? No, it's ridiculous, unless you're applying for a job at Stack Overflow.


2

Should I share my offer letter? If these companies were one of the FAANGUMLs then sharing the offer letter would be fine because these companies are used to competing with each other over talent, however since these are both smaller companies, I would not suggest sharing the offer letter with company A. The valley is small, people know each other, especially ...


6

In my experience, it’s really difficult to up your pay grade beyond the standard yearly/twice-a-year time frame once you move in to a firm. Is money a major factor for you? Or working at A? You said you told x+8 to A already and are trying to figure how to get from A what B offered you - the optics seem greedy, but remember that you play for yourself. If ...


-1

and I was wondering, is this good to include in the resume? Or should I go with a more traditional approach of just Education, Experience, etc.? As a "rule of thumb", if you tailor your resume for the specific job you seek or found, you have higher chances that if you try to make a more "universal" but perhaps more generic resume. This ...


0

As someone who has (over koff-koff... several decades ...) "interviewed a'plenty of 'coders,'" let me now very-plainly tell you this: "I don't give a damn *about 'your source-code!'" If you actually made it to my interview, then I already presume that "you are technically competent." (Therefore, I expect you to somehow "land four-paws down.") Therefore,...


7

First of all, you need to start the process knowing exactly what you want and what (and how much) you are willing to give up. If you do not have the answers, nobody else will. What is the best way of getting out of this situation when I'm already in process for "less desired role" (in a situation like the one for company A) Based on your strategy: ...


-1

Disclaimer: I never worked at a startup nor ever had the same kind of leverage you seem to have when negotiating a job. However if you still want to know my 2 cents, here they are. Being able to ask or being offered a percentage of the profit as part of your compensation is already quite rare I think. Most people are in no position to ask for this. So if you ...


2

Is there any point in reaching back out to her to understand if things can be picked back up from where they left off, or do I write this off assuming they weren't actually going to make me an offer? If you do nothing then the very real risk is that they won't contact you. Touching base has very little risk: They can ignore it; they can respond back ...


1

What you say is: Even if there is no profit, and the valuation of the company goes down, I as an employee want to get a positive bonus while people who invested money into the company rack up losses. So, no, probably not going to happen: Even if you invest money into a company, you don't get part of the revenue. Variable salary is for letting employees ...


8

Is this too out of the ordinary to ask? Yes, it is. This would put you at risk of having negotiations cut off and binned. If that isn't a problem for you then go for it. Anything out of the normal box is risky if you don't have some sort of extraordinary leverage in terms of skill set or perhaps personal connection. This'll give us both the "feeling", ...


0

A thank you note may or may not help, but if you write it well, it can't hurt. Doing the following will maximize your chances: Keep it short. People are busy, they don't want to read a novel. They shouldn't have to scroll or spend more than a minute reading it. Focus on the positives. You can't fix anything you did poorly on at this point. Remind them how ...


3

Is this too out of the ordinary to ask? I worked in many startups. In my entire career I never encountered a situation where a portion of a contributor's salary was based on revenue, not achievement, not profits, or anything else. I imagine it could make sense if for some reason the company cared solely about revenue, and not profitability, or quality, or ...


1

My manager was put as a senior manager of a technical field that she did not grow experience with, and so could not help at all in my technical development You seem to misunderstand the role of your manager. Your manager doesn't need to have any experience in the technical field she's managing at all. You are paid to be the specialist in your technical ...


8

You gave it your best shot. You'll either get the job offer or you won't. That "thank you note on a stationary" thing they taught in high school isn't as appropriate or useful as it used to be. Most of the other ideas you have about asking for another chance will not be a good look. A few things you can do while waiting: 1) Continue on with "plan B" ...


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