New answers tagged

13

why can't they provide me with a position in [team A]? Maybe they don't have any (relevant) open positions right now. just let me skip the 2 interviews for the position at division B Consider this from the other side - would you ever want somebody coming into your team who you hadn't interviewed? If somebody tried to do that to my team, my boss would ...


3

This could also discourage candidates with "invisible disabilities" -- nothing that would interfere with the job if they can work in a normal chair, but a bad knee could be a sports problem, and many people have problems with their back, knees, and hips as they age. I am picturing these "lounge chairs" as being lower to the ground and softer than normal ...


1

As a makeshift measure (that is to say, not ideal and temporary) you can increase the level of formality by adding ritual to the interviews: ensure the room is clean and cleared in advance, then put a notice on the door ("claimed for X" or similar) that also means no radio playing if the room is even a little dark go to IKEA and buy standing and/or desk ...


2

A relatively small expenditure should allow and adequate level of venue presentation. Get HR to buy a presentable desk and chairs that can be placed in required rooms when needed. The table or desk could be collapsible without appearing so and without looking cheap and shoddy. Chairs could be suitable standard chairs.


2

This really depends a bit on: the concrete layout and what you understand about an intimate room the type of interview you want to conduct the company culture 1) How intimate is it, really? If people need to share a couch with the interviewer, that will feel way too intimate for many people and might make them close up or feel insecure. It might indeed ...


0

I mostly agree with @Ed Heal, you should absolutely avoid doing interviews in break rooms. Being interviewed in a break room would give me the impression of a workplace that is both seriously overcrowded and assigning a very low priority to interviews - both are red flags, at least for me. I once worked for a company that had pretty much the same problem, ...


5

I think you’re overthinking this. Personally I would much prefer to hold an interview in a relaxed informal space with sofas. This would help break through the “Job Interview” discomfort, and give you a far better idea of who you’re meeting than sitting stiffly around a table in a meeting room and asking questions like “What is your greatest weakness”.


11

I work at a very large company that is well known in the industry. The problem is that sometimes we don't have enough conference rooms in the facility These two statements don't play well together. It sounds like there's a bigger problem to solve here: either your company does not have sufficient facilities for its needs, or your co-workers are ...


-1

Lie. In the USA the employer can not release your salary. Tell them something realistic and they should top it.


1

You asked two questions, but unfortunately they're both hard or unsatisfying to answer. First: Why would they require such detailed information? It's hard to know why they would require that information, because reasons may vary. The most predictable reason is so that they can see if their salary range for this position is in line with your history. If ...


3

If you are concerned about such things, how about having a couple folding chairs and a (maybe also folding) table that you can take into any room for the interview time? Upright postures and a table between you (also for papers/ coffee if any needed during interview) would add some sense of a work environment vs leisure.


0

Not sure why this question is active as it was asked 6 years ago... The languages that you listed on your resume do not go together. Consider listing computer languages in a 'tech stack' format such as LAMP, Linux operating system, the Apache HTTP Server, the MySQL relational database management system, and the PHP programming language. On my resume I have ...


0

I would recommend giving them a IKM Java test. It provides you with an easy to read printout of their skills and shows the areas where they are weak and strong with the language. It shows their skill level compared to other developers who took the test. It is multiple choice and can range from 1-2 hours. Here is a link below: https://www.ikmnet.com/java-code-...


29

There is a difference between intimate and casual. It sounds like what you have are too many casual spaces. My current employer has combinations of "huddle" and "team" rooms. I would never conduct an interview in a "huddle" room, which is often some chairs and maybe a table, and none of the furniture is "office furniture". The "team" rooms are small ...


110

facilities staff is stretched too thin Does your company not have a room booking solution? If so, just print out a piece of paper with text "Room blocked from time X to Y on date Z for interviews". And paste it outside a decent meeting room in advance. When you need the room, just ask the people to vacate. I work at a very large company that is well ...


244

I would ensure that a meeting room is available for these interviews. Perhaps bump people out of meeting rooms as they could rearrange/or use the lounge. I would do this also because an interviewee is also deciding if they want to work for you. It looks very unprofessional to have a meeting in essentially a break room.


4

In a comment, you stated, "[a]s opposed to finding a CTO, finding developers (full-time or interns) seems much simpler." I'm sure it seems simpler to to hire developers rather than a CTO, just as it will be simpler for your startup to fail than to succeed. Hiring the developers first, before hiring their leader/manager (whatever the title) is an outright ...


2

With all due respect, I think your question is missing your actual problem. You can test your candidates in all the ways you like aiming at whatever skills you desire. But no test will be of use to you if you lack the knowledge to understand and especially evaluate the answers. Therefore, it is common to have HR-personal, as well as technical-staff present ...


29

I would suggest you forget the coding tests and focus on concepts, processes and ideas. You are looking for a very strong profile. Being a full stack dev requires knowledge about back-end, front-end and databases. Somebody with couple of years of experience cannot possibly be strong in all of these areas. Also you mention you don't have a team or a CTO yet....


-4

The best advice I ever received about hiring developers was from the below article. Hopefully this will help: https://www.joelonsoftware.com/2006/10/25/the-guerrilla-guide-to-interviewing-version-30/


8

From what I've learned recruiting developers, carefully reviewing with them their work experience can already hint you a lot to what to expect in terms of abilities and proficiency. So as a long and important introduction, I would ask about their past experience. Companies they were working for (it can be a good plus a developer understands business and ...


0

There are few things you can do: 1) You mentioned you are outsourcing the development of you application at this time. Is it possible to get team lead/senior developer of the outsourcing team to be involved in the process? That person should know what particular frameworks and languages you use as well as for what to look when hiring a person. I suspect you ...


2

You should clarify with the recruiter what "meet the team" actually means. In several places where I've worked and interviewed, this was recruiter-speak for "full-day onsite interview". Chances are you'll wind up doing some coding/algorithms and design question, and probably a "behavioral" interview with a hiring manager. The recruiter should be able to ...


2

A rushed interview process would be a red flag, yes. However, there is no indication here of any "rushing". The process matches my normal experiences. You've had an introductory talk of a good length, passed a fairly thorough practical test (perhaps it was sufficiently self-explanatory not to require any further explanation — I'd be bored to tears by ...


4

If they flying you out to their office - you passed to the next stage and there is no need to go other the code line by line if it is acceptable. I wouldn`t say it is a red flag


9

Paraphrasing: "This company's hiring process is different from every other company's hiring process. Is this a red flag?" Maybe they don't buy into the half day, full day, multi day, group interview/hiring process that every other company has bought into. Maybe they're better at identifying the right candidate. Maybe they have better things to do with their ...


9

Some companies with a tight job market have learned the hard way that if they stall with candidates in the interview process, expect them to find a position with another company in the meantime. I've had to tell a number of companies that took too long in the interview process that I've found new employment elsewhere. It sounds to me they have already ...


13

I wouldn't consider what you described a "fast" interview. A one hour interview is usually enough to evaluate a candidates coding abilities. With a three hours coding test you are already in the same range as the big names in the industry. Amazon, Facebook etc .usually have 4 to 5 hours, but they also have soft skill interviews embedded, so that is just 2 ...


21

The speed is not necessarily a red-flag by itself. If you're concerned, do some research on the company and the position before you go. (This is a good idea no matter what of course) See if you can find out: How long this position has been open. If this is a role with high turnover. Are there reviews of the environment you can read, like on Glassdoor.com? ...


8

The other two answers suggest that either this is irrelevant, or that making the disclosure might imply that being close friends is somehow a bad thing. It's both relevant, and a fairly normal potential conflict of interest which should be disclosed. Any time there is a possibility that a relationship will unfairly or inappropriately affect an outcome, a ...


5

Before the process should I disclose this to anyone in the company or at college? Or should I do it during the interview so as to not cause any partiality in the selection process? Tell them it if they ask you. Otherwise I don't see the need to "disclose" such information. Framing it like that seems like you two being friends were a bad thing (which is not)...


8

This is really up to your friend and his/her ability to be impartial in the process. Have you talked to your friend on if the other interviewers know of your relationship? It's up to your friend to recuse themselves from at least your interview if they feel it is necessary. Or should I do it during the interview so as to not cause any partiality in ...


3

Undergraduate degrees are generally viewed equivalently, irrespective of whether you study in the US or UK. Companies that are exposed to international education systems appreciate that the duration of undergraduate degrees vary depending on the country where you're based. It is also possible to graduate in the US with a BS degree in 3 years (with AP high ...


8

In most cultures/organisations, demoting is extremely rare, except perhaps as a step towards dismissal. Demoting someone is extremely demotivating, the assumption is that this person will be resentful, have trouble accepting instructions from people who were once peers or subordinate, will have no reason to assume they have a shot a promotion, etc. Whether ...


3

I would risk to say the job of some CEOs is being fired in the end. I have been at least in two organisations bought by a larger one, that when they wanted to pass unpopular measures/fire multiple people they hired a CEO for them to be the face of those measures. And in one of them, the actual interim CEO, a partner, stepped down and went to his former ...


4

The competition at that level is incredibly fierce and, in order to win one of these coveted positions, it's generally not enough to be good at your job. You have to play a lot of dirty politics which often involves stabbing people in the back. If a CEO were to get demoted and he opted not to leave the company, there's simply no way his successor would be ...


17

At any career level, having someone replace you, and then having to witness daily how that new person performs at your previous the job (either better or worse than you), would be extremely frustrating to most folks. Further, the new boss doesn't want to deal with the baggage and office politics of a disgruntled employee who has been demoted. Finally, as ...


50

It's not just CEOs. It's pretty unusual for anyone in a leadership position to step down and take a lower role in that organization. To start with it usually makes for a strained relationship between the former leader and their new peers. If someone didn't get on well with the former leader they may try to take some sort of revenge now they are equals. Or ...


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