New answers tagged

3

In the interview situation: Go with the flow. Depending on tone and rapport you could comment on that you expected a different setup, but at this point, there's nothing to gain. However it is a smart move to ask, when setting up the interview, with whom you will talk. This will help you prepare your own questions, and gauge what type of questions you will ...


5

Adding to the other answers, there may have been some PhD specific issues at play. In your previous interviews, where you where asked if others could join, you may have been applying to work specifically with one individual. In which case those extra people where there to help the main person decide whether to hire you. While your latest interview it was ...


14

Last interview I had, there was a panel of 7, then a “chat” with the team, then lunch with another part of the team and a final chat with most of the panel. Took my original certificates as they had had copies just so they could check. Told it started at 09.00 for the day, lunch provided. No other info about how it would work, whether other candidates would ...


122

Continue as if nothing had happened. Panel interviews are one of a variety of legit interview formats and they don't really need or are expected to get your permission ahead of time for it. You might want to instead show interest in what the format, participants, and content of upcoming interviews are by asking the person organizing them instead of assuming ...


1

I found an internal connection to the company (an old colleague) which I can use as an internal reference in my new application. In fact, they dedicated a specific reference field in their online application form. So, it is important to them. Tell your contact what happened. Tell them that you're still interested. Ask them for their advice. If your old ...


9

Internal references usually carry a lot of weight. At least for getting through the screening stage. I’d say it’s well worth giving it another shot. What have you got to lose?


1

As @sascha's answer points out, what do you have to lose? My only issue is that we have no way of knowing if they will spot that you have applied before. Possibly they won't but possibly they will and rather than think you have a good reason for applying again, they may assume you are blindly spamming out applications or they may just assume they had a good ...


19

What could you lose? Time. What could you win? A job you dream of. It could look very appealing for the employer, that you are so motivated and passionate about the position, and throw in your application again. Finding passionate (intrinsically motivated) people is rare. Personally, I would call you and ask why. Because there must be a good reason.


0

I do agree that technically you're not doing anything wrong by applying to multiple positions. However what I get from your question is that you're worried you fail one job interview, and that same recruiter inform the others that you failed and they decide not to pursue it any further. No way for us to know for sure but it is possible that if the interview ...


1

The recruiters are not likely to speak to each other, but of course it can happen. It is not a bad thing to do, but make sure to mention it when they ask if you have other ongoing applications. Being secretive about this will turn out bad, and there is no reason to. Just make sure you are honest/consistent in what you tell them during the different ...


3

Unless you know for sure that these jobs are for same positions from the same (geographically distributed) team - it's ok to apply for multiple positions. Based on your preference and their acceptance, you can choose any one, if you land on multiple offers. Usually the pay-scale can vary based on location - so I do not see any downside for these applications....


1

There are privacy rules. Google for example will be allowed to do certain things with your account data and not others. Let's say Walmart hires you and checks what Google knows about you, as far as it is legal. And then you get a job at Google. Google can legally do the same things as Walmart. Google might be technically able to do things that Walmart can't ...


7

It depends on the country and the company. The safest approach is to assume that if somebody has your data, they will use it against you. But in reality things are usually a bit different. In most companies, especially big ones, employees' access to data is restricted, and they are allowed to see only the data that is relevant to their job. This is done ...


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