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I wouldn't worry about the issue. If you were engaged in training with a company for two months - assuming the training is either full-time or at least a substantial time commitment - then I think it's perfectly reasonable to declare the start of that training as the start of your time with the company. If your new employer asks for clarification about the ...


1

In my experience, if there is a discrepancy, the company will reach out directly to discuss. I've had that happen a couple of times - once when the omission was mine and once when they tried to contact a university I had never attended (or said I attended). No harm in getting ahead of the situation and letting HR know, but I doubt if this will be turn out to ...


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In some cases it could be beneficial. Are you applying as a PR person or someone who would be involved in the contents vof the site in a direct way? Point out how these issues could be damaging their brand and how you would ensure that it doesn't happen again. Otherwise I would leave it be. As other posters have pointed out, you only risk embarrassing them.


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That would be extremely brave, and I mean brave in the EXACTLY the way an MP would mean it when referring to another MP's idea in parliament. You never make an issue of someone's mistakes in the business world unless you are out to make an enemy


12

I wouldn't. Embarrassment makes people unhappy, even if they claim something is important. I had a professor in university who would go on and on about the need to avoid mistakes and check your work. I actually still have the syllabus bit for it. It had things like this: I would peg that as a one off if other assignments did not have things like this: ...


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The best references are the ones who are able to speak capably about you, will give you a good review, and are at least somewhat charismatic over phone/email. Why? Because the worst thing that could happen is someone you pick gives a negative review. After that, you want someone who will sound convincing, they're selling you a bit. As an aside- ...


3

A good reference is going to be simply one that the company finds acceptable, and provide the company with a sense of trust that you are all that you say you are. It's both as simple and as complicated as that. Typically different interviewers will hold different opinions about what is important. So, typically you would find someone who would: Be respected ...


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You can make a tag cloud of all your skills, this could be complemented with a graph over how well you know each skill in particular. For an example c# 4 star and Java 3 stars. It helps them see if you have the right profile. One advice would to also use a good template and not just the regular white and black. I once made my Resume in "Dark-mode" ...


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Let's look at this from another perspective: let's say you working on a team, you're working well above what's expected of your current level and have been for a while. However, there isn't a need for another senior member of this team. Also maybe you're a bit of a quieter type, not so prepared to blow your own trumpet. Maybe also your manager isn't so ...


3

Is this promotion process unusual? Maybe. If you're already in the highest (non-managerial) role that currently exists in the department, it would make sense that there could be some major HR hoops to jump through to justify creating a new position so that you can get a promotion. If that's not the case and you're simply moving from, say, junior to senior ...


1

Yes, your promotion process is quite unusual, but hang on. This looks to me a bit of a forced promotion, when people that are responsible for promotion don't think you can make it, so they create something (or act up on some process in the company), to see whether you're fit. Promotion is more about your individual performance, meeting goals and helping a ...


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