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24

It is not about experienced or fresher. Most likely it is just about having that final check, gauge your work attitude and personality. If everyone is happy, make that call to the HR to release the offer letter. Standard process. If you have already cleared your technical interview, just be pleasant and nice, and everything will be fine.


1

Simple. If you leave them after verbally accepting a job where they pay you 25% less than you want, they are unhappy. If you accept a job that pays 25% less than what you want, you are unhappy. It's better if they are unhappy than if you are unhappy.


4

Ethical? Acceptable? Those are two different things. First of all, a verbal contract is indeed a contract when everything stays the same. It's the last part that's the catch. When the written contract is delivered it often has nuances, detail and even sometimes major items that are substantively different from expectations. If the contract is essentially ...


2

You had a change of heart. If the rules of your jurisdiction allow you to walk away from a verbal employment offer, then you should have little worry about doing so if you feel the need to do that. It is not unethical to bring your change of heart to the attention of your employer. In fact, not to bring it to their attention would be the unethical thing to ...


15

Would you accept the job if they offered more money? In that case, it does no harm to say so. It never does any harm to walk out of a negotiation making clear that you would reconsider if they change their offer. "As you know, I would really like to take this position, and am prepared to take a cut in salary to make this possible. However, I've ...


1

If they have policies that govern their pay, and you're not willing to take the pay cut then I'd tell them that you're really torn because of how much you love the opportunity, and having reflected upon it properly, you just can't justify the salary reduction and therefore you have to decline. You might even suggest that if they can find a way to make it ...


-2

It's perfectly fine to reject this offer. You can certainly reject this offer. But salary isn't the only compensation. you said, "concluded that I would advance professionally more with a new company in a high-demanding activity." Is that true? Does the new job have much better benefits? Would you be able to walk or bike to work? Getting rid of a ...


37

This has nothing to do with ethics. You've had a change of heart and have changed your mind. People do this all of the time. Explain to this to them. Offer your apologies for any inconvenience and move on.


6

Following up from your previous question, where the negotiation got off to a bad start after a unilateral concession, it seems they didn't budge at all when you informed them of your higher current salary. This means You will be going in there on day 1 feeling underpaid They know they can push you around in future negotiations Your negotiating position with ...


3

It is perfectly OK. It's a non-issue. Just send a polite email with these words: Dear Steve. Thanks but I have decided not to go ahead with the opportunity at XYZ. Thanks again, Jane Jones. Note that you should not explain yourself in any way. It's unprofessional and unbusinesslike. Simply state the words "I have decided not to go ahead with the ...


77

Regarding ethics, it's acceptable to walk away, for a multitude of reasons. Firstly, are your intentions from the start were for you to reach an equitable agreement? I'd say that they were. You didn't harbour ill-intent. You may have misstepped along the way, but you didn't set out to mislead or confuse them. When I think about ethical behaviour, I like to ...


44

Now I want to reject this offer. Is it acceptable to decline this offer after accepting it? You did not sign the contract, so technically you did not accept the offer yet. Once you submit the signed contract and get it countersigned by the organization, then only the agreement is sealed. Right now, it's in evaluation stage - make your choice carefully.


3

As a hiring manager, I am happy to connect with candidates on LinkedIn at any point in the process. In fact, I will often initiate it if it's a candidate I have sought out as opposed to them seeking us out. The only reason I would reject such a connection is if it were a totally inappropriate candidate (usually there's at least a couple internationals who ...


2

I was thinking that it already might ruin my recruitment process since most of the article said that it isn't polite or proper to have a connection with the hiring manager before the interview. On any network, social or otherwise, it takes two to connect. If the hiring manager thought it isn't polite or proper, they would not have accepted. They could have ...


2

It is OK to send connection requests in LinkedIn to the recruiters, hiring managers, directors, VP or CEO of a company. It is not uncommon for job seekers to do that. However, please remember that after those people accept your connection request, every post you like, share, or write on LinkedIn will automatically show up in their linkedIn feed. They can ...


9

Nobody cares. LinkedIn is a pretty casual place, nobody is going to get stressed out one way or another if you request a connection - and particularly if the hiring manager has accepted your connection, they don't regard it as an issue. (Also, don't take it as meaning anything positive for your application that the hiring manager accepted your connection)


10

Any suggestion? I don't see this as a bad move at all actually. If you are looking for work, then connecting is a natural thing to do. If you are looking for work while employed, be sure to turn off the "Notify your network" feature in LinkedIn. NOTE: The way you use the tool versus say myself will vary. For example I typically don't connect ...


2

Would like to add on the answer that Seth R has provided. If you give someone a slight push to do something earlier, they're more likely to do so. If you remain passive, they'd also likely remain passive themselves and would take longer to get back to you. This isn't just the case with job offers, it's also with interviews. I once had a brilliant company ...


16

The question means exactly what is being asked. They want to know how soon you need a decision. Suppose you already have a job offer in your pocket from another employer and need to let them know by next Friday, but you wanted to see how this interview went before making a decision. Telling them you have a deadline of next Friday could indeed expedite the ...


0

I would feel nothing about this. Contracts are committed when both parties have signed. Until that moment in time, you are in the negotiation stage. There is no phase where the contract is not signed yet, but it somehow is already legally binding. This is why the standing advice is to never leave a previous employer before you have the signed new contract in ...


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