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2

Nothing beats a great demo. If you have experience, but no great demo, you might want to realize that in the company's eyes, all you have is your opinion of great experience which they can't verify. Put the project on GitHub. Cut out the unnecessary parts. Get it running, even if it's primitive. Take a few videos of it, describing what you did and what ...


2

You show proficiency in hobbies by having a polished product. Doesn't matter if it's wood carving or a game engine. Until then you're not proficient in it, you just know a lot about it but not enough or not completely enough to have a masterpiece to show off. It's hard to get people to wade through unfinished projects to prove anything, because it's a lot of ...


3

For LinkedIn specifically, you can add projects to your page. I think this would be the best way to communicate all of the different aspects of your experience and demonstrate that you know what you're doing. For your resume, create a list of your projects and give 1-2 sentences on what you did with each of them. Finally, when applying for positions, write a ...


-1

There’s probably no point. They told you that they’re only hiring for the most critical positions right now due to Covid, and the position is still open eight months later. This indicates to me that it isn’t viewed as a critical position, and they’re unlikely to hire anyone but the “perfect” candidate. Maybe their hiring stance or financial position has ...


12

IMHO, you may want to contact the company again. In your cover letter, you can mention the company's culture, technology etc is very appealing to you. If they didn't find anyone by now, perhaps you have a chance.


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