Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
485

Unless you actually have a medical condition (e.g. anxiety) which would mean that going to the event is going to be a serious problem for you, just go. If the company chooses to pay you to go to an event, that's their choice. As I've frequently said: you don't get to choose what to do at work, your employer does. Basically, work out if this is the hill you ...


177

Yes they are. You are to report to work as normal. If your work today consists of a Christmas party than so be it. The reason you need to take holiday time is because This is a team building exercise It's not a day off This is quite common and they are allowed to do it. I would just be happy your employer cares enough to give everyone a paid day of no ...


167

I beg to differ from my other posters. You are in a different country, it costs you time and money to contact them. More importantly, it takes your mind off holiday. Don’t answer at all. If you get back home, just blame it on the roaming that you could not answer. Just because your boss is setting a bad example by working his holidays does not mean you ...


75

I'm going to be answering this from a different angle. A lot of times when these types of events happen during the workday they are coupled with some talks given by the higher-ups. They might be congratulating the team on a good year, giving out awards, or talking about the plans for the future. It's not clear from your question, but it could be that this ...


43

I've been in this situation, and if I had to attend I'd just find some quiet side/corner to eat, read, then see if I could head out early. Free food is always handy anyway. But there is always another option, one that won't make you look bad by skipping off during work hours, and might actually give bonus points. One year the Christmas party was coming up,...


42

How do I explain being unaware of labor day to my co-worker with out sounding like an idiot. The truth is pretty much always the best explanation. Sometimes it won't prevent folks from forming an impression of you that you would rather avoid. But that impression can fade with time as long as you avoid similar gaffes. Usually self-deprecation told with a ...


38

I'm going against the current trend but I think you should answer. I'm assuming that your boss had a good reason to CALL you. He didn't send you an e-mail (even on your private e-mail address) which you can read when you want. He CALLED YOU. I may be wrong but to me it means he had a compelling reason to do so. You didn't answer and it's absolutely your ...


37

For details you'd need to check your employment contract, but in all contracts I have ever had or heard about, holiday entitlement is reduced proportionally if you do not work a full calendar year. So if you only work three months in a given year (because you only started in October, or because you quit, or possibly because of unpaid leave), you only get 3/...


27

The fact that you've responded to the email asking about the options limits your options - because the organiser knows that you're seeking options. So, you suddenly coming up with an illness, overriding project work, or something else will be seen for what it is. All you can really do is decide whether you want to attend or to take holiday time to avoid it....


27

Unless you're objecting on religious grounds (i.e. you're non-Christian) then I suspect you may have social anxiety / social phobia. This is nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed of. It's a real condition that affects millions of people - especially under 40's. It can also be accompanied by / lead to depression and other coexisting conditions. If you find ...


18

You've done what you can. All you can do is quite clearly state that you're on vacation and don't have a reliable connection or capacity to work. All you can really do is give a brief answer, provide an alternative resource if you have one (someone else who can provide fuller answers) and enjoy the rest of your vacation. And then ignore future voicemail/...


18

My coworkers are doing Halloween and Christmas at work, I'm a Messianic Jew, how do I avoid ruining my relationship with them? Say nothing. Do nothing. Conduct yourself as you normally would. If someone says "Happy Halloween" or "Merry Christmas" to you, respond with a simple "Thank you." or "Thank you, and the same to you." Acknowledging a holiday, ...


17

Just tell the truth I was in a similar situation several times. I never talked about the vacation until I got an offer. Often you don't know how long it will take them to finalize the offer, so that the vacation might fall into the notice period. On another occurrence I negotiated that I would start one month later. And once I just told them I planned a ...


13

Keep well out of it. If either HR or N+2's boss think that N+2 should be informed, they will contact N+2 - bottom line is it's part of their job to manage the fall-out from things like this, let them manage it the way they think it should best be managed; there may be issues here you're not aware of, and you could potentially make things worse by getting ...


13

I work in IT for a state office and what you've described sounds exactly like my co-worker (I'll can him John). In the 2 years I've worked with John, he has never attended a single social function to include extended lunch cook-outs and on-the-clock holiday parties. If it's not a mandatory social gathering- he doesn't attend. He's in no danger of getting ...


10

Greedy bastards. You mailed them on a Thursday, telling them your last working day was on Friday four weeks later. That is more than four weeks notice. They are required to accept that notice. That "acceptance of resignation" email in February 2017 is pathetic. That's two months after your notice, and more than a month after you actually quit! But there is ...


10

I'm almost certain it'll be pro rata based on the number of months you've worked. In addition it'll almost certainly be only FULL months, i.e. if you gave a months notice now then you'd only have the number of days you'd accrued up until the end of May. In all my time working in the UK this has always been the way it's worked.


10

While their method for calculating the effective accrual is.. well it's pretty shoddy. They are allowed to do it this way however - as long as you get your statutory entitlement, which in your case would be 22.7 days (since you started 70 days into a leave year) and they are giving you 27.5 so you are above the minimum. Given this is essentially a one-time ...


10

While on site in the US you should follow US work schedules. Do not stay at the hotel or not show up to the US office simply because it is a European holiday. Make sure to speak to your manager and remind him that you will be working in the US during this holiday. Ask if you are entitled to a compensatory day when you return to Europe. Most managers are ...


9

How should I ask my boss if I can work extra hours to make up for a work holiday? Assuming you do not get paid for the holiday ( which you very well may ), you could ask this way: I would prefer to not lose any money over the holiday, could I work 2 extra hours a day over the other 4 days this week to make up for it? ( thus keeping you at 40 hours )


9

This is perfectly normal. It means that your holidays have been reduced, proportionally, based on the days you're working. You're working 20% less, so you're entitled to 20% less holiday. Or in other words, if you multiply your current holiday entitlement by 0.8, you have your new holiday entitlement.


9

There should be an employment contract that says how many days of paid holidays every employee has. If that isn't mentioned in the contract, then there are probably laws in your country that state the minimum. Every employee has the right to take the holidays they are entitled to, and the reason why they take it is none of yours or your fathers business. ...


8

Don't. You're on holiday. Whatever it is, it can wait until you get back. But of course you can't do that, the thought will keep nagging you. Try to reach him via phone or email. Ask what the emergency is. To be fair it might as well be an emergency, but you don't know yet. I would assume competency and brace for extenuating circumstances, at least for ...


8

The scrum answer is simple, pull less work that sprint. Done and done. We actually do this chronically, as all our engineers share an weekly oncall rotation. Whoever’s on call is encouraged not to pull sprint tasks for that week, but instead to handle oncall, and proactively work on continuous improvement of their choice (to make that week a bit more ...


8

you all want the same month off This is a lie. YOU want holidays, they are "not sure". That's the difference. The role of the manager is to either ask them "when" they want those holiday and in case of "not sure" accept only those who are giving specified dates. The rest would need to adjust. If your manager "need to find dates" explain that for you ...


7

I'm sorry your father lost his job. That sucks. But... you're both adults. You shouldn't spend your life running around after him when something bad happens - you need to live your life, and he needs to live his without either of you leaning on the other too much. If there were some specific action that you could do that needed you to be in Italy, that may ...


7

The work location is helpful to know but in most developed countries paid holidays by law are between 2 and up to 4-6 weeks. Anything more is usually unpaid or partially paid. Furthermore holidays usually have to be agreed to by the employer and contractually or by law not guaranteed amounts won't need to be acquiesced by the employer. Depending on the ...


6

Is it acceptable to ask for this leave just before or just after my review? It almost seems like I am asking for too much, especially if I end up having to negotiate my raise. You can ask for leave any time you choose. If your concern is that asking for this leave would impact your raise, then clearly you should ask after the annual review and raise ...


6

Assuming you are on a salary, count up the number of hours you've worked (not simply those you're contracted to work, but actual hours worked) and divide it by your pay. Determine if this figure is above or below the minimum wage, and if above, how far above. Demand a raise. Next time you take a day off, turn off your phone.


6

This reminds me when my old place of employment had a Bring Your Kids to Work day. Being single and childless, I felt the entire day was unfair, as parents would be dealing with their kids all day, while I had to work. In fact, one of the parents suggested that minding their kids at work was more work than work itself. Cold comfort for me. There were ...


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