Hot answers tagged

290

Bottom line, L is risking your health and creating liability for the company. Personally, I wouldn't want to swim anywhere where the lifeguards are fatigued. While I will always remind people that HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND, this is one case where your interests, and HR's interests align. IF something happens due to fatigue, or if someone decides to sue, your ...


253

How do I get her to understand that her attendance is critical but at the same time try to cater to her being a single mother? I think what you need to do is make them understand that her attendance on time is not critical since she does a great job (and is a single parent). Change the policy maybe? I also don't like how her attendance reflects on my ...


253

The company would be well aware of this issue and I would imagine unless they say something you shouldn't either. It is clearly not a management issue so don't make it one. On a side note, a few minutes is nothing. My code can take up to 40 minutes to compile and around 10 minutes to fire up the backends to run a regression test. Usually it's more like ...


203

How do I get her to understand that her attendance is critical but at the same time try to cater to her being a single mother? I think this is a tough question because everything I think of comes back to her answer of "...well I'd love to come in earlier but I have kids...and I'm a single mom." First you have to be clear in your own mind how ...


197

I have always been an early starter, being in the office normally around 7am. There have been occasions where coworkers have made remarks as I leave at 4pm to go home to my family. I simply ask them, "what time did YOU start work this morning?" (with a smile). When I've informed them that I have been at work since 7am, it makes more sense to them. It ...


193

However as the company grows (expecting to double in the next year) and beyond, how can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused when extended to a larger and larger amount of people? This is what middle management and company culture are all about. As new employees join, make sure they understand your liberal company culture - what kind of ...


139

Should I stop deciding my own working hours? Yes. You don't know if the other employees are contracted to different hours, or regularly work from home, or have private understandings with management. For example, they may have traded some regular hours for being on-call over evenings and weekends should problems arise. It might be considered acceptable for ...


137

I am aware its up to the individual what they do and its really none of my business really what they do with their spare time, So you're fully aware that what you want to do is out of line and you have no business controlling other people's working hours? but my question is if there are any subtle ways i can perhaps convince them to not come in early or ...


122

I have zero intention of doing anything for them for free ever again. So don't. Polite but firm along the lines of 'Are these hours going to be billable?' At this point you're not refusing to do anything or burning bridges, just after information in writing, preferably from the person authorised to pay you. I'm actually wondering why you're bothering at ...


118

Should I count this waiting time when I report my hours or should I exclude it? Yes, it's time you have to utilise for the job, so include it.


117

I guess I have some occupation-specific feedback on this. I was a lifeguard at facility pools and a large public beach for many years. It is standard policy to rotate lifeguards regularly, including "down-time" for a reason. If a lifeguard gets mentally stale, bored, or zones out, people can DIE. If the manager does not act, you have to go to other ...


78

Never assume that work hours are flexible--or that they're inflexible. Joe Strazzere said this in a comment, but for some reason none of the answers so far say it, so here goes: Ask your boss if those hours are okay. If you are worried about asking her/him, then you know this isn't something you should be doing. In fact, even if you are somewhat worried,...


78

First, wait to see what Bob does. If he gives you a hard time, take this directly to Alice and let her know what is going on. If Bob scolds you about what's going on, explain your situation and mention that you already work more than 50 hours a week, and that you can always drop back to 40 if he wants you at specified hours, as the rest of the time will ...


72

If I were to transfer, would I be expected to give up 1.5 hrs of my personal time or would I spend 1.5 fewer hours in the office? Your commute is your personal time. And how much time you spend in the office is up to you and your employer. I don't know how it works at your company, but I have never heard of an employer who would say something like "Oh, ...


61

The best way to respond to this kind of razzing is to take exactly what they said and say it back to them but for the morning. E.g: Them: "Jeeze you're leaving early today." You: "Jeeze you started late today." Keep it light, say it with a smile and make it obvious that you are simply doing (and saying) the reverse of what they do. NOTE: You need ...


60

I work at a company with 800+ employees, that has flexible hours as one of the perks of working here. The way this is managed is by access control via RFIDs, but this doesn't mean that management is draconian about working 40 hours a week(although it's expected that you're being productive some amount of hours close to 40 each week). The fact that access ...


56

Speaking from experience. If she gets her work done in a timely manner, doesn't make undue mistakes (due to rushing to get it done, for example), and is on the worksite when other employees need to interact with her, then the only thing she seems guilty of is not adhering to a policy you don't seem all that concerned about her following, except as to how it ...


55

Grow up, don't worry about what other people are doing, focus on yourself and do your job professionally. You're just an intern: you're there to learn, and one of the things you're learning is exactly this. Developing bad habits this early on isn't a good way to start.


50

There's no realistic way to ask this without risking the negative repercussions that you say you want to avoid. In essence this boils down to a request for a raise as your hourly wage will go up. Your productivity is not relevant to this discussion. As you simultaneously want to reduce the hours you work, this is an even more delicate discussion/negotiation ...


47

Ultimately this depends on whether your job is qualified as exempt or non-exempt. In short, if you are non-exempt your employer is required to pay you for every hour worked, including overtime. Exempt employees receive a salary irrespective of their actual hours worked and the employer is largely free to put constraints on their working time however they ...


45

If you're working more than 48 hours per week in the UK, and haven't signed to explicitly say you're happy to do so, then that's (in most situations) illegal. You could choose to get HR involved on that front alone, or you could get them involved on bullying (getting yelled at in nearly any situation counts, especially being yelled at frequently for not ...


42

One of HR's main mandates is ensuring that the company is in legal compliance in how they handle their employees. Your young, inexperienced manager doesn't see this as important and is taking risks and making messes because of it. Either it's found out prior to the company being cited for underpayment and HR/payroll has a huge headache sorting it out or ...


38

This is more of a workplace culture issue. It sounds like your lifestyle may not fit with what the company expects. Although you may be capable of meeting all of your objectives and accomplishing your tasks in a smaller time window, you still risk being looked down upon for not matching the expectations that the company culture has. Based on what you ...


38

I'm mostly all about getting the work done and less about the schedule, but it's not possible to entirely ignore the schedule. Unless she's working 100% uninvolved with any other person in the company, there will be times that people need to know if she's in to ask her a question, get some work to/from her, etc.; knowing when she's going to be there is ...


37

Ultimately it's down to whatever you can negotiate with your client. If it were me I would consider a minimum payment for being woken up at all, even if no work is done. This is like the 'call-out charge' for a plumber who comes out to your house and finds there is nothing to do. You still have to pay him a minimum fee for having him show up. The other ...


33

Perhaps you should consider going the opposite direction and giving your entire team flextime, since, as you say, this arrangement doesn't bother you if the work gets done: In contrast to traditional work arrangements that require employees to work a standard 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. day, flextime typically involves a "core" period of the day during which ...


32

I would take them aside and say "We both know that we meet the same requirement for hours worked (or the same number of weeks per year), I just come to work much earlier than others. You publicly razzing me about leaving early risks tarnishing my image, just like if I were publicly razzing you about showing up late. Can this be the end of this?". ...


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