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193

However as the company grows (expecting to double in the next year) and beyond, how can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused when extended to a larger and larger amount of people? This is what middle management and company culture are all about. As new employees join, make sure they understand your liberal company culture - what kind of ...


137

I am aware its up to the individual what they do and its really none of my business really what they do with their spare time, So you're fully aware that what you want to do is out of line and you have no business controlling other people's working hours? but my question is if there are any subtle ways i can perhaps convince them to not come in early or ...


122

I have zero intention of doing anything for them for free ever again. So don't. Polite but firm along the lines of 'Are these hours going to be billable?' At this point you're not refusing to do anything or burning bridges, just after information in writing, preferably from the person authorised to pay you. I'm actually wondering why you're bothering at ...


90

I was told to "manage my own hours and manage when I come in to work for now, until we figure out a schedule for you" Do that. Come up with a schedule that you think is reasonable and would be acceptable. Send it to your boss. Track your hours in a spreadsheet of some sort. Send it to your boss at the end of the week. Ask your boss when you should expect ...


60

I work at a company with 800+ employees, that has flexible hours as one of the perks of working here. The way this is managed is by access control via RFIDs, but this doesn't mean that management is draconian about working 40 hours a week(although it's expected that you're being productive some amount of hours close to 40 each week). The fact that access ...


45

If you're working more than 48 hours per week in the UK, and haven't signed to explicitly say you're happy to do so, then that's (in most situations) illegal. You could choose to get HR involved on that front alone, or you could get them involved on bullying (getting yelled at in nearly any situation counts, especially being yelled at frequently for not ...


30

Today, during a talk with him (my boss), I was told to "manage my own hours and manage when I come in to work for now, until we figure out a schedule for you". I took this as a little weird, but thanked him nonetheless after our conversation. What should I do? Whenever your boss gives you instructions and you don't understand them, there's only ...


26

No pay, no work. It's as simple as that. There are times when we give our employers a little more than what they're paying us for, but this is a clear case of your being taken advantage of. If it were me, I would cease performing all unpaid work... and I'd be looking to terminate my relationship with this company. You need to be in the "You" business. If ...


26

Many employers allow staff flexibility in their work schedule, and many employers have (hourly paid) staff that self-report what hours they've worked. Although your current employer sounds fairly unstructured, these things in and of themselves are not unusual. That said, it is understandable why you're nervous, since you've just started this job and have no ...


25

I am aware its up to the individual what they do and its really none of my business really what they do with their spare time, but my question is if there are any subtle ways i can perhaps convince them to not come in early or not have a lunch? i have tried saying "oh your keen today" or such joking remarks, but its made no difference. I accept its ...


21

I have a hard time seeing the correlation between enforcing 40 hours and not clocking people in - such a system is probably being "misused" as it is and you can't tell because of the scale. You're either enforcing hours or you are not. Mind that clocking people is not a mere nuisance or a sign of distrust, it is an administrative tool that gives you ...


16

It's real simple, they are taking advantage of you. What they are doing is probably illegal. You need to stop working for free, now. This is a form of a sweatshop and I'd advise getting out now. I know that's generally not immediately possible, but you need to do yourself a favor and find a new job. Compliance Assistance - Wages and the Fair Labor ...


15

Joe Strazzere has an excellent answer. I will add this answer in case you find that your system doesn't scale. I have no desire for them to 'clock' in or out I will mention that clocking in/out is (to some people) a "factory" thing for low skilled workers that aren't trusted. I can see why this might be distasteful. There are other methods of ...


11

You're focusing on the wrong area I know its tough and the easiest path seems to be to change other people but that fix will always be temporary. The problem you have with people, whatever it may be, will effect all areas of your life. I'd recommend seeking professional help from a therapist or other suitable professional (I don't know the problem so can't ...


9

A lawyer once explained to me that, because an exempt salaried worker may be expected to work more than 40 hrs without additional compensation, the employer can expect a worker to work around 40 hrs/wk, but cannot require a minimum of 40 hrs--meaning sometimes it might be more, other times less, but overall it will probably average 40+ hrs. ...


9

First thing first, be careful with ultimatums. If you really want to make it clear that it is a deal-breaker to you, here's what I'd do (and as a manager, how I'd like it to be done): 1. Send an e-mail for an appointment to your manager Hi/Hello [Name/Surname depending on how close you are] Can we schedule a meeting between the two of us to discuss ...


9

This isn't unusual in smaller places. It allows everyone flexibility without dealing with a lot of paperwork, but is built on 1 thing: trust. The boss trusts you by allowing you to record your own hours. You trust the boss hoping he won't make a mistake on the paperwork (and if he does, just point it out politely and all should be fine). Come in, work your ...


8

The first thing you need to do is to dig up your contract and see what you actually agreed to. Even though X stated 9 - 16:30, you need to verify what is on your contract. Next, you need to speak to your boss ( not X ), regarding any discrepancies between what he expects of you and what is on your contract. If you are going to be working an extra 30 ...


8

Trust, but verify. Broadly speaking, you want to trust the people under you. If all of the work is getting done, and there are no complaints, there's NOTHING to investigate/look into. Might be worth asking about people's bandwidth, to see if there's a case of "I have very little to do" or "I'm about to burn out under this workload", but generally, if ...


8

It depends why you want it not to be abused. If you're worried about employee not working enough you'll have to put in place performance indicator. Then it'll be another discussion if you let employee come and go as they want as long as performance target are met or not. If you want employee to be on site around the same time and a minimum of time to ...


7

In the UK (and I think most anywhere in the EU), you cannot be forced to work regularly over 48 hours a week on average, unless you agree. And it is illegal to discriminate against you in any way for not agreeing to this (EU working time directive). But then 48 hours a week is a lot. In the end, you have to decide yourself how many hours work a week you ...


7

How can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused The simple is, you can't. You have to trust your employees, that's how the flexible working system tends to work. I have no desire for them to 'clock' in or out This is pretty much the only way to ensure that nobody is abusing the flexible working and that everybody is doing the time that they ...


7

Most places you are expected to put in 8 work hours and lunch does not count and is not paid. From second answer to "8-to-5 vs. 9-to-5 as acceptable regular work hours" I'd add that while that's true, in some types of jobs like software development and sales there's almost always flexibility in scheduling. Management realizes there isn't a 1:1 ...


7

Today my boss, who is also the owner, contacted me and told me that my working hours will be changed to 12PM to 9PM and this is final. He may think it's final, but it's a negotiation. One outcome is that you completely give him what he wants. The other is that you completely refuse (and he probably fires you). But it's possible that you can find an ...


6

I value my time highly, and would prefer not to have work encroach on my other activities. Even before discussing this with the management, the question you should be asking yourself is whether you are willing to work at an organisation where such overtime work may be the norm? Your statement sounds a bit contradictory. On one hand, you prefer not to have ...


6

Is there any way I can strongly justify it on my end? You can try by saying "I value my time highly, and would prefer not to have work encroach on my other activities." But realistically, if every other employee is salaried, there is no way they will bring in a new engineer as an hourly employee. If this is an important issue for you, you should move on ...


6

This sounds like an awful situation. I've been in similar. It's nasty. You are wise to ask for help, starting here. You could leave this job and get another. That's obvious, and it's easy to say. But you probably can't afford a period of unemployment, and you may even have an immigration problem if you have no job. And, you are in no condition to look ...


6

Freelancing and contract work is often measured by output and results. Many if not most jobs are judged and remunerated based on hours. It's perfectly normal to do so. My concern is that they will start to measure how many hours I "gave them" instead of measuring mine and my team's output. They should be doing both. But in any case if you want the job ...


5

As long as you're over 16, the only limit in the USA is that the employer must pay you for all worked hours, and must pay overtime when you work over 40. However, state law may have lower limits. https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/whd/flsa/screen6.asp https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/rest.htm


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