80

This is a non-issue. Your current company hasn’t changed, only your position/role/title.


22

This seems like an honest mistake - an omission on your part. Since you haven't lied about your position, but simply forgotten to update your CV, I would expect the worst outcome to be a question with regards to this. I can hardly imagine them retracting the job offer over this. If they do, you may want to approach them, but this may also be considered ...


13

If you want to get advice specific to your situation, the Citizen's Advice Bureau would be the place to go in the UK. Broadly speaking, the fact that an employment contract refers to a non-existent employee handbook in one section has no impact on other sections. If there is a section in the employment contract that talks about the dress code and refers to ...


9

To me, it seems like he thinks (actually fears) you have job interview at another company, that's why he brings you in this awkward situation. While I don't necessarily think he would be spying on you, neither listening at the door, nor recording, he knows that nobody would like to have a job interview in the current bosses office and a doctor's appointment ...


7

Your location might matter, but in the US your resume is marketing material, not some legal document--there's just no requirement to list everything on your resume. So you would be perfectly fine to leave it off deliberately or accidentally. (It's actually really common to leave things off. When you're young you're usually including everything just to pad ...


5

Congratulations for the new job offer. You are overthinking it. Full time employees are more valuable in the job market than interns, as showed by the total compensation. You should have mentioned that you were a full time employee at that time, it would give you a little bit more power during offer negotiation. I am afraid it is too late and I will lose ...


4

Your question makes it sound as if the employees are paying for these phone calls. If that is the case, and if you're asking if it's reasonable to require employees to occasionally dial internationally, the answer is no. It isn't reasonable to require employees to pay for the cost of company phone calls, local or international.


3

HR doesn't care about your CV. Or almost never cares. The only parts that might matter are things related to specific job requirements, because if you later have an issue they can rely on those to fire you (if you didn't meet requirements) or to cover themselves. This might apply to education - e.g., if a job requires a 4-year degree then your CV showing ...


1

This is a pure business question. You have cost A and cost B and your company has to decide which one they want to pay for. HR is not your boss. Let HR say whatever they want. If your boss says something about it, you will know what to do. Is it reasonable to require employees to occasionally dial internationally? Absolutely. As long as it's a company ...


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