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144

Please don't judge the organization based on a group email from Human Resources! They probably have a new-hire checklist they're following. They probably have a few-years-old email message they send to everybody. They, almost certainly, did not write this email and have superficial knowledge (if that) of what it contains. Plus, they mentioned "topics ...


42

I'm going to try to be gentle here but I think you've taken this as far as you can - you talk about your boss "wanting to get rid of" you and the PIP being an "excuse to fire" but let's be realistic here your boss has so far gone to some pretty substantial lengths to help you. The first "PIP" wasn't formal - presumably to avoid the negative associations of ...


25

Make it very short and simple. There is nothing you can say that will change what you have done. Let them know now, so they can get started on either contacting another finalist, or starting the search over. Now keep in mind depending on what you signed, and what country you are in you could be in violation of a contract with penalties.


20

You are a software developer with 2 years of experience in the bay area in the bottom 1% income bracket for the field and you're now having HR complaints against you? Find a new employer.


15

The optimal path for your CV / future interviews is typically you leaving for another job, rather than you being fired or you leaving without any job lined up. So, since you already have verbal offers, next time you meet your boss you should let them know that you are in negotiations with another company for a follow-up contract. You can ask her how ...


14

Last month, I received an email from HR asking me to go through a list of topics which might be helpful for me during the training period. Frankly speaking, I was not impressed by the list of topics provided. Most of topics I was very familiar with. Since most of the selected students were from professional degree A and only a few were there from B, it was ...


14

Declining an offer after already accepting it is very unprofessional (at least) and maybe illegal (breaking some terms of contract), it can also severely burn bridges for you. Moreover, in your case, you took 3/4th of the time to revise your decision - which makes it even worse. Read the offer letter acceptance criterion carefully and if you're ready for ...


11

My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Not your problem. You've just been asked to write a reference. It's up to the recipient to decide it's usefulness. Should I be frank about the nature of our relationship ...


10

Outsource it. Insperity and companies like them are full of experts to help companies exactly like what you describe. One seriously bungled HR "event" can destroy a small company. A company such as this can make sure you start out "right" and keep you there. Remember: HR is a supporting function - it is not a revenue generator. Keep it simple, keep it ...


8

Since you don't have a HR department, I have to assume your company is very small. In a small company, your scope of duties can change very quickly. I would expect your manager's manager to approach you about what's going on, but I would reach out and set up a 1:1 to understand the scope of your work. Given that your manager is returning part-time next ...


8

As I see, you have two choices: Keep stalling and end up being put into PIP (and most likely the outcome will be negative anyways, based on the previous experiences), and finally end up being terminated. Resign, leave gracefully and search for other opportunities. Point to note, in current scenario, in either of the cases, you might run into the situation ...


7

Contracts cannot change unilaterally, or they are not contracts. This is why they ask for your signature, because they need it. You are perfectly within your bounds to reject the change, or negotiate it in a way that would make it worth to you. Every contract change is a negotiation, and every negotiation can fail. That takes care of can, now for the ...


7

This is really frustrating. It sounds either like a novice and immature manager or a really bad miscommunication. Some things you should do quickly, including escalating, that could change the behavior of your manager quickly: 1. Are your colleagues having the same experience? Have a conversation with some of the folks you work with and see if the same ...


7

I'd be curious to know what your thoughts are on this matter. Of course, here we go. Am I wrong? Not basically. But in details I think you are trying to do it in a non-working way. Let's try to imagine we are the one to put stuff whereever they want. Would we care more if someone else takes things out? If we were a defiant kid - no we wouldn't. Instead ...


7

IMHO you are being a little naive and you are not judging the situation and it’s potential for you correctly. Or you completely misunderstood what that company does and should be looking for completely different job in some highly specialized areas. Let me expand: If you are familiar with all those topics and you can skip all those trainings - that means ...


6

There are almost certainly other kinds of recourse available, though what exactly that will look like will vary depending on where you are. Check your contract or company handbook for the grievance procedure. Raising a formal grievance will make this something the company cannot ignore and must address. (If they don't, or fail to take it seriously, you might ...


6

Am I in the wrong for cleaning up after someone else and protecting the environment? You weren't in the wrong when you only cleaned up after someone else and protected the environment that way. Bravo for that part. Most folks who say they want to protect the environment don't do that much. But you became in the wrong when you decided that instead of just ...


5

Years ago I played an online game (Goalline Blitz if you've heard of it) and got to know a guy pretty well through managing our team. He and I have now been friends for about 10 years. In every way I consider him a friend and not just an online acquaintance. The reason I bring that up was that when he applied for a job, I served as a reference. ...


3

You have no obligation to write an apology letter, and in my personal opinion, it would be pretty tacky to do so. If you haven't signed anything with the first company, you didn't commit to them yet and it isn't too late to change your mind. They will (or, at least, should) understand this. Simply tell them that you've changed your mind about the offer and ...


3

It just seems you have a manager who is poor at their job. Some of the times the main reason for avoiding official channels is to avoid getting into the legalities, and it seems to be the same in your case, too. If the out-of-the-band requests are being used (exploited) for tricking you (or anyone) into getting some work done beyond the scope, it's not ...


3

The problem is that you are engaging in a passive-aggressive behaviour which ends up to be a solution worse than the matter. I would assess the siuation in the following terms: your concerns are totally justified and understandable. You have clearly an above-than-average concern about the environment and you absolutely want to "do the right thing" on the ...


2

I get why you are feeling so frustrated. The anonymous coworker sounds gross and aggravating. But you do come across as a little over-zealous about cleaning up the mess. It's frustrating, but you probably can't change the coworker and people aren't asking you to clean it up. I'd leave it alone. I wouldn't expect much to change about your pay or recognition ...


2

I also clean up where I work. We're a tiny company and only have the cleaner in once a week. So the trash cans overflow sometimes, and I take out the trash. Some people leave dirty dishes in the sink and sort their rubbish carelessly. So I sometimes wash dishes and re-sort the rubbish. A couple of days ago I put a "CLEAN RECYCLABLES ONLY" sign on a bin, ...


2

You don't mention which country you are in. But I think you're not thinking this out properly. You say you're considering rejecting the offer. But you have already accepted the offer, by this previous email exchange. In many places this alone would be considered a contract. So what you're really considering here is quitting before you start the job you ...


2

You asked a few questions, My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Ultimately, that's on your friend, not you, to decide. There may even be specific reasons why he's picking you (maybe he's applying for a job ...


2

They have valued your spare time at £2000, what do you value it as? If money is not the issue, maybe ask them for some extra annual leave instead or to leave early on fridays. They have opened up negotiations with this new contract offer, you don't have to accept the first offer. If you really feel you cannot do it then talk to your boss and explain your ...


1

When writing a letter of reference, I include a statement of how I know the person. I'm delighted that Xxxx Yyyy asked me for a reference. For the last two years, Xxxx and I worked together as volunteers at Zzzzz. Our work required us to interact with users of Zzzz's product Qqqqqq. etc etc Xxxx was a good partner for me. He was reliable.... etc ...


1

I was a volunteer coach for a college sports club. I had several of my players, as well as someone who was as assistant coach when she was a graduate student, ask me to write recommendations for them for grad school, and for jobs. None of those positions were sports club related. So, first of all, it's a personal reference, but what I did was I thought ...


1

Unfortunately in the world of IT you often have influences, including supervisors, who have a very limited scope of rationale when it comes to their demands - such as demanding you memorize all of the columns in a query. Most IT Managers/Leaders understand that it is our job to break things every single day then take the figurative "hammer" and "fix it". ...


1

At first I would find it weird to see a software developer digging at the trash bin like a raccoon, but considering that there are rules and, from what I understood, even city laws, it would make sense. Now we have to consider that "most" people don't give a rat's ass about the environment and recycling. Moreover, I would say that the person (people?) doing ...


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