138

I would suggest that you don't write an e-mail where you specifically mention the salary. However, a more general follow-up e-mail might be a good idea. Dear ..., Thanks again for the interesting and informative phone call. I really got a great impression of your company. The tasks seem very interesting and challenging and the environment is great, too. I am ...


67

if I send it I'm in a weaker negotiating position. Yes you would be. Before negotiating you should be prepared and then stand or fall by your words. You're best just waiting. Pay is just one of several factors they'll be looking at. It's a given that they can offer less without you telling them. but I elaborated that I think I deserve it because of my ...


33

would it be better for me to take my manager's resignation plan or say no and wait for HR to terminate me? Do neither. Don't resign now. Don't just wait around to be terminated. Instead, work hard to find your next job first, then give your notice.


31

'Because I found some of your jokes unpleasant.' It reinforces the jokes are unprofessional It directly answers his question It marks an issue with the behaviour, not the person. The issue is the jokes not him (well, don't say it's him if it is). This has the best likelihood of keeping things peaceful. Keep the sugar coating to a minimum in this case. Be ...


28

Do not resign. Take your chances. In these Covid times, employers will be more understanding even if you are terminated. Also, as others have pointed out, you may actually be able to get unemployment benefits for being terminated and not for resigning. Finally the point about good recommendation; If he is asking you to resign because of bad performance, then ...


23

Measuring a person's value by the amount of leave days they take is beyond idiotic. If people are taking unauthorized absences, that's a different thing entirely. Using leave days as part of a performance review like this is dumb because: A) it has no bearing on what value an employee brings to the company. Your star programmer may have put in how-many hours ...


19

Unless you explicitly said that the number you said was the minimum salary you would work for, they will treat it as a target. They will assume you are willing to negotiate. This is even more so if you gave them the number because they asked you. If they want you, but think the salary you asked for is too high, they will come back with a counteroffer. The ...


14

How recently? The chances are good that you're not the only candidate. Once they've talked to everyone, and then discussed it internally, they'll get back to you. If you try to rush the interviewers, it doesn't look good. Everyone knows that pay rates are negotiable. Even in companies with highly-structured rates, where you start on a pay scale for your ...


13

This is a business problem, not an HR problem. While you might talk to HR about what you can do to get a better handle on things (coping mechanisms, techniques for handling stress, etc.), or what other opportunities might exist for you at the company... this isn't a problem they can directly solve. They can't make the situation less difficult for you. They ...


13

First up: my empathy for having to deal with that. I'm mentally picturing a coworker saying that they have a raging hard-on for another coworker, and I'm already feeling dirty. Second, a small answer: don't rule out simply talking to the coworker. All of us have said things that wouldn't be appropriate to say at a wedding, a funeral, or the office. Part ...


11

Usually in the United States, you are not eligible for unemployment benefits if you have resigned, but you are eligible if you were fired for poor performance. Your manager's claim that you could still claim unemployment benefits if you resign contradicts this, and you should not necessarily believe that he is right about this. Perhaps you are in a unique ...


11

In the letter, should I write that I was "asked to resign" as the reason for leaving my position? No, just do something along the lines of: "I regret to inform you that I will be resigning my position with [blah place], effective on [mm/dd/yyy]." Keep it as simple and brief as possible. If you are serving a notice period, add that as ...


10

I run a small company that at one point was 11 people. We never had any HR staff or even an HR consultant, and there were days we really needed to have some. What HR provides to the company, and we had to muddle by without or doing for ourselves, included: knowing labour and to some extent tax laws and the various forms and regulations involved. (New baby? ...


8

What happens now depends on HR and their policies. If they think you jumped the gun, this could bite you in the bottom, and hard. You did the right thing by setting up an appointment with your manager first, before HR, but you should have gone to the person first, as it shows an effort to resolve things yourself. Whenever dealing with anything that might ...


8

You don't indicate your location, but denying someone a promotion because they took "too many" days off is probably illegal. Unless you're willing to risk a lawsuit or another legal complaint, please don't do this. There are a few reasons most people take time off: either because they were given vacation time, because they were sick, or because ...


7

Your manager has his own best interest at heart, not yours. So when it is about losing your job, following the manager's advice without checking it very carefully is never a good idea. Here's a possibility: Your manager doesn't like you and wants to get rid of you. All his talks with HR are just made up, and he can't lay you off at all. But if he convinces ...


6

Is it common to take into account attendance on a career ladder? No. Many software companies give unlimited time off or 30 days off as a minimum. Typically official HR rules about time off aren't applied to productive tech team members. The manager isn't even tracking sick days because it doesn't matter. All that matters is delivering/solving problems. We ...


6

It's too early to go to HR, and I am not even sure HR is the correct person to talk to about this. As I understand, the bottom line here is: You can't do your planned work because of certain restrictions (COVID) and management understands that. Now, you have some bandwidth to spare which you want to devote to some other productive work. Very good! Do some ...


6

In addition to the other answers, which are good, something to be aware of: This coworker is your senior (in that he's been at the company longer than you have). Presumably, he hasn't changed his demeanour in the last X months since you've been there, and he's been like this for a while. And presumably, either a) Other people find him offensive but he's ...


5

The major roles of HR are Legal Compliance keep track of all local and global labor laws, put internal policies into place, educated, monitor and guide internal behavior Adminstrative handle lots of paperwork: personel files, correspondensce with third parties, etc., benefits selection and admin, vacation, leave of absence, etc. Talent acquisition ...


5

I assume you had been searching for jobs. I recommend that you continue searching for a job until you have a signed contract that you find satisfactory. If they are messing you round then there is nothing sweeter than being able to say "I've had enough, find someone else. I just accepted a better offer."


4

I don't see that it was necessarily a mistake to accept the job on the spot. What would be a mistake is accepting their demand to work as a contractor before the contract is sorted out. Just make it plain to them that you are not prepared to do this. If this makes them rescind their offer, you are better off not working for them.


4

There isn't a whole lot you can do. In all US companies that I worked, that's standard practice: when you max out your leave you stop accruing and anything else is forfeit. Your company is actually being generous by allowing a conversion into Medical Leave time (at least in the US that would be better than normal). Your best approach is to ask nicely and ...


4

You already made a mistake: giving them the first number. Don't compound it now by backing down from the number you've given. There's only one right answer to the question of what your salary requirements are, and it's "what are you offering?" You'd better believe that if a company is searching for someone to fill a position, they knew exactly ...


4

You are trying to convince someone who is saving money by not being convinced. There is no point in talking - let alone in undocumented talking. Get legal support: Either a lawyer or some organization who can back you up.


4

You did not state a country, but just one important thing from Germany: At my old company they changed from CompanyA to CompanyB as well. I was the only one who refused to sign the new contract. It was the same salary and the same benefits, so why would I sign it? Half of my team got layed off with minimum notice (2 weeks, in Germany 3 month is usual and ...


4

My mistake was accepting the job on the spot, right? I don't see why that was a mistake. You said that you had already spent time considering it. The second problem: they first promised a contract but they're now claiming they need me to work as a contractor for a few days before sorting the contract out. I said yes, when first asked on the phone, but ...


4

Something is odd here. Setting up an employment contract is not inherently harder than setting up a contractor contract. If they can set you up as a contractor they can set you up as employee. A good company can go from verbal acceptance to starting your first day in a week, unless they need to do something like a background check. The first thing you ...


4

The university will ask you to do what's in their best interest. You can be reasonably sure that it's not in your best interest. The only times when you would resign yourself are (1) if you want to leave and they don't want to let you go, and (2) if you did something that exposes you to criminal charges, and you are given the choice of resigning or the ...


2

Its more about how you can explain what you did, rather than what hr does. For example, you mention never having built an EVP. But I bet you did, you just didn't know it. Because as a manager, you probably focused on career development for your team, and fostering a culture of constant learning and ownership of product. What you want to focus on is not the ...


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