84

It sounds like there was a serious disagreement between your former coworker and the company and they came to a mutual agreement to part ways with the understanding that neither party would discuss the actual reasons. Your manager may have been a part of the conversation or they might not have been. Either way, it's pretty clear that you're not going to get ...


30

From various points in your posting it is clear that you are missing information and would like more. You will need to accept the fact that you don't have a right to that information and it would be wrong of your line manager to give you that information, since it is private about that other employee. With respect to trusting your manager based on the ...


14

Is there a genuine way that my line-manager could not know if he resigned or not or why he was leaving? The most obvious one is that your (ex-)colleague did in fact raise a grievance, specifically naming your line manager. At that point, your manager would have been effectively as cut off from the process as anyone else outside HR, and the next thing they ...


14

TL,DR: Yes it's possible your line-manager doesn't know why, and it's possible that nothing "underhand" has happened: it may simply be a case of "amicable" redundancy. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, this is not legal advice. Nothing in this answer is meant to imply anything about the conduct of either your colleague or their employer. The ...


10

Without wanting to be too harsh, you seem to be making the same mistake here that a lot of other junior people make: all your reasons are based around the advantages to you, not the advantages to your potential employer. They've made the eminently reasonable decision to focus on staff who want to have a long term relationship with them, and you don't want to ...


10

should I? what should I say? No, there is no point to providing feedback. Best to just move forwards and focus on where you're heading, not the minor setbacks on the way.


10

Harry should retain a lawyer, follow their advice, and forward any communication from Mr. Big Shot to the lawyer. Mr. Big Shot's communications should not be replied to unless directed by the lawyer. This is probably cheaper and less stressful for Harry than the alternative.


7

Being called a fraud or a fraudster doesn’t matter. If they do it in public, you take them to court for libel and a good lawyer will make them pay. Being convicted for fraud would be a problem, but with your description I can’t see this happening. Especially if someone threatened to use “all legal and illegal ways to extract money and get work done”. That ...


6

Given the current covid-19 lockdown crisis it seems an odd time to 'choose to leave'. But you already know he didn't choose to leave. As you say earlier in your question: The official reason for his leaving is listed as redundancy If he was made redundant then that means the company let him go; he didn't just quit. Otherwise it would be a resignation or ...


5

You don’t have the right to personal information about an (ex) employee. And that applies in many locations / countries... So the manager can rightly refuse to tell you anything. Which is why many times people get told that “they are expanding their personal horizons” or “evaluating their career options”...


5

People leave jobs all the time, and usually when someone leaves a job, there is work left incomplete. Not their problem unless they had a written contract to produce a certain item by a certain date. Harry's only obligation is to maintain a written record of all communications with the ex-client. Keep a diary of any phone calls, but ideally, refuse to take ...


4

It's not worth it. The recruitment process, as you've described, appears ill-conceived. If your application was successful you would presumably not be expected to work without a compiler or IDE. To assess your suitability for the role based on these artificial parameters (and without further discussion of the exercise) is absurd. They risk letting excellent ...


4

You may be in luck. Due to COVID-19 many people are having problems estimating their dependent care FSA amounts. Some people have needed more care, while others have needed less. One of the changes covered in the CARES act is related to Health Savins account, and Flexible spending accounts. This is from the IRS: COVID-19 GUIDANCE UNDER § 125 CAFETERIA PLANS ...


3

I do not know how references work in industry It can be quite varied. I know people who got hired at banks using a reference from Mom (different last names, so the background check company did not flag it). I got hired in my current job providing 3 names and they did no verification that they had any relation to me. As soon as one replied, I got the offer. ...


2

The last thing any company wants is feedback from someone they rejected, pointing out the flaws in their process. The only thing you would achieve is being blacklisted at that company, and at any company people from the original company move on to. It's petty, unprofessional, and possibly fattening. Seriously, we had someone do something like that once, and ...


2

Depending on your state/province/country... You do qualify for unemployment if your job was eliminated through no fault of your own, your hours were cut under a certain threshold, you were terminated for other causes (e.g. bad job fit), or you're furloughed for a certain time period (you don't get paid, but you keep your benefits). You do not qualify for ...


2

You are overthinking this. As a line manager I don't know many things especially when it relates to legal and HR matters. HR may have gotten rid of the man for a violation of policies and didn't give me the reason. Legal may put a gag order, so that even if I knew it's not allowed to disseminate the information. Also, sometimes, a guy leaves and doesn't give ...


2

So, your first answer is that you don't get to know that information, there's really nothing you can do about it, and fishing further is only going to hurt you. I'm sorry, but that's the way it is. As far as what you can do about it... well, it sounds like your current situation is unpleasant and unlikely to improve. You also have a manager who filed an ...


1

If you have a grievance against the company then you should present it through the proper channels. If you are simply unhappy with the company, then you should first look for and accept a new position at another company before resigning from your current company. What happened with your coworker is solely between him and the company.


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