58

This bonus was something your company paid to you because they thought you should have the money. If the bonus was to be split, your company would have split it between the two of you and not left it to you to somehow share. Your company thinks you earned it. Otherwise you would not have the money. This bonus is for referral alone. It is not for helping the ...


36

It’s just the entire process of who owns the Referral bonus in this specific instance and should splitting the bonus or handing over the bonus to referree, where it was not agreed in advance, constitute the correct decision? Do referrer needs to make the referral that results in employment to technically deserve the referral bonus? The way referral bonuses ...


33

"She said no because he complained about me to head office so it's out of her hands." Why can someone on probation just complain to head office and bypass their manager? Do you have some kind of bad reputation in this org? Usually I'd expect management to side with the long-term employee and not the new hire. Or does this person have connections to ...


24

It is your company's policy to pay you for the referral. That money is yours, you own it once it's paid to you, and you can to do with it as you wish. If you decide before or after the process to share it, that is your decision to make. You could have said "no" to your ex-colleague and not given her anything, which would have been just fine. Either ...


11

Referral bonuses are for the referring employee only, to incentivize people bringing good candidates to the company's attention. It is not customary and there is no expectation to split it with anyone. Of course the money is yours and you can do what you want with it, but this is pure charity, not fulfilling any professional expectation. You went above and ...


10

Ask your boss for emergency 1:1 and say (don't need to go into too many details): Hi. My mother is in some medical condition that requires my help. I will need to be away from work for X days starting Y. The status of my current tasks is ABC, is there someone you like me to hand it over to?


9

I think all existing answers are good, but thought I'd answer to make it clear why companies offer referrals and therefore who is expected to receive it. Hiring people is expensive and time-consuming; you either need to pay someone internal to do it (who may be a generalist and not able to target exactly the right groups) or you pay external recruiters to do ...


9

At this point I don't think there are many options left besides escalating the issue or accepting that you have to work less or work together with this coworker. When escalating however, I'd suggest to focus on resolving the problem and not just ask them to fire the other employee. I honestly doubt they'd be happy if some low level employee comes along and ...


8

The company awarded the money to you, there is nothing more to discuss. There is zero reason you should ever tell an acquaintance about such a windfall. Ouch, she felt entitled to money awarded to you and convinced you to feel the same way. Sadly, this is one of those situations where this applies: I can explain it to you, but I can't comprehend it for you....


7

The referral bonus is intended for you alone. Your ex-colleague does not deserve it more than I, or other Workplace SE answerers, do. Additionally, I would be worried having recommended a person with such low ethics. She clearly manipulated you using shady psychological tactics. Be wary about her in the future.


6

What do you recommend I should do/say? Do nothing for now. If/when HR asks you to pay back some or all of the cost of your benefits due to breaking your contract, you can either just pay it or talk to your lawyer and see if there is an alternative. Then, if you haven't saved the money required, ask about a repayment plan. In my experience, these contract ...


5

Much of this site assumes you're working in the privileged corporate world. They're often out of touch with how the real world works. I'm going to be harsh here- I get the impression that there's more here than you're letting on. Your accusations here and in Law have been inconsistent. You put a lot of time and effort into making us dislike this guy- you've ...


4

You shouldn't tell company B about company A if you wish to go through B's hiring process. B. would most likely just pass on you if you told them about the offer before you even pass B's hiring process. That said, if company B has told you their pay range/minimum and it's more than 10% below what company A. is offering there's probably no point going ahead ...


4

is it in my best interests to inform company B that I have received an offer from another company, Yes it is. If the recruiter has asked you to let them know about an offer, there is the possibility that they may accelerate your interview process and present you with an offer depending on how desirable of a candidate you are and their need to fill the ...


4

Polish up your CV/Resume then say you will agree to the reduction of hours but on the sole condition that you remain on the same monthly/annual salary indefinitely, or until this problem is resolved. This will do at least one of two things: Force the manager to question if there isn't a better solution than to reduce your hours. Reveal what the actual ...


3

Switch from email to daily phone calls to hourly phone calls to 10 minute calls to calls every minute. You will get your paperwork when creating your paperwork is less inconvenience than getting your calls. They are inconveniencing you, you should inconvenience them.


3

No, you should not file a complaint against her. However, you should mention to her, calmly, that you did email her, repeatedly, to follow up about this job, and received no response, and that she should check her spam filters and/or trash bin to see if your messages got filtered. Spam filters work weirdly and are not always correct, and weird things ...


2

You should not volunteer any information that can put you at a disadvantage. With plethora of candidates these days, telling B that you have an offer most likely will terminate your hiring process with them If both companies are nice destination for you, you should pursue then both. Hiring process is not an offer of employment and you cannot be certain it ...


2

Would they be able to detect my paid employment? Yes. Since it's short and long ago, it's not very likely but it's certainly possible. If I do clear the checks and join the bank, can they fire me if they come to know from someone about the paid employments? Yes. You lied on your application. That's typically grounds for dismissal. I know in an ideal ...


1

Yes, they can find out about previous employers from tax and other records. Those were short and long ago so maybe they’ll find them maybe not. Yes, they can fire you for lying on your application if they find out. You might be able to explain it away as “part of an early history of odd jobs,” so you didn’t bother to list them - or might not. Try being ...


1

They are likely setting you up to fail While you didn't give much details about yourself (what industry you are working in, did you have problems on this job before, etc ...) usually it is a common practice for companies to trust their experienced well-established workers more than new guys. Especially in cases like this if he really straight out refuses to ...


1

They have no obligation to email you, call you, interview you, consider your feelings, respect your time, or acknowledge you in any way. These things happen, for a variety of reasons. Let it go. This isn't a battle that needs to be fought.


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