128

'HR is not your friend' is a statement that's often repeated to mean that HR's job is to protect the interests of the company rather than yours. Therefore if you have some issue in your workplace and go to HR, keep in mind that they won't prioritise helping you if it creates some conflict with the company's interests. That said, there are plenty of ...


103

It's impossible for us to know exactly what occurred. What we do know is that every sign seemed good, until the point where you provided your previous salaries. It's possible they realised they could not afford you, and instead elected to look elsewhere. In the future, make sure that salary expectations are managed from the start - just in case this was the ...


55

I am not sure how I should feel about this. Disappointed. Is this a standard practice? That depends what you mean by "standard". It's uncommon, but not unheard of. Stuff happens. What is a standard response in such a case? The only thing to do is to move on and find your next job.


46

TLDR: HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND For a six month status meeting, you should just focus on how you are getting along and any tools and or assistance you need to make you more productive. Keep it positive, and have solutions ready for any problems you wish to address A one-on-one with HR is not like sitting down with a friend and talking about all the problems ...


22

It happens for all kinds of reasons all the time. I thought I had a "job in the bag" once about 8 years ago, went out of town for the weekend, and came back to a voicemail saying that the person who was going to send me the offer had been fired. Until you have a SIGNED JOB OFFER on your desk, the only thing you really have is a prospect. There is ...


20

You've only been there 6 months, you're still proving yourself. I would not advise bringing up anything unless it is a major issue. Small issues can make it look like you're not a particularly good fit with the workplace or your colleagues. Major issues like health and safety risks or similar should be mentioned, but you should never single any individual ...


16

What is my best recourse in this situation? Move on - it's frustrating to get so "close" and then not get there but that's the way the cookie crumbles. You aren't the first person this has happened to and you won't be the last. Unless you want to attempt to negotiate a lower salary then at this point spending any more energy on this particular ...


11

In my opinion, you should not do anything. Hiring process went its course, technically you are a fit, but financially not. What do you need to be bitter about? Negotiations are what they are, negotiations. Each side weighs pros and cons of the offer and makes a decision if it's a good deal in their perspective. For them, you at that position for that salary ...


11

Despite your thoughts, you were not successful in your job hunt - you didn't manage to persuade the whole business you were worth the salary you wanted. "Making your displeasure known" is only going to make you look bitter and burn bridges. Just move on.


10

First, she doesn't have any way of knowing about potential coworkers/groups with predatory or misogynistic behavior in advance. If there were more women in the environment, she would be able to talk to them and hear their experiences on an individual level ("Person X is constantly trying to invite me to parties") and at the structural level ("...


10

As I see it, there are two possibilities, here: There was another candidate with the necessary skills and desired experience that had a lower salary requirement, and they went with that candidate. If that's the case, I would contact those you interviewed with, thank them for considering you, and wish them well. The HR staff/director was intending to use ...


9

'HR is not your friend' the end result of a cost-benefit analysis. Some hold strictly to it, due to past negative experiences. I find the maxim to be useful, it spurs me to think critically instead of trusting blindly. In my opinion, the same applies to managers - but I'll use 'HR' below. Your 1:1 with HR is a negotiation disguised as a conversation. If you ...


9

It's not "normal", but it's not unheard of. Most likely, it has nothing to do with you. There are any number of reasons why odd things like this would happen. The company has shifted focus to off-shore options, and nobody told the hiring manager. A company reorganization is ongoing and hit the department during the interview/hiring process. Hiring ...


8

TLDR: You priced yourself out of the market, let it go and move on Interviewing is a complex series of events, and compensation discussions are one step. The interviews didn't drag out, they were ongoing through the salary negotiations, and to be blunt, you failed. Here's what you did wrong. As this was asking for unnecessary information, I filled in only ...


6

Congratulations! You appear to have a manager who actually tries to do a good job and seems to care. Nothing wrong with that ! I want to protect my job. It doesn't look like you need to worry about that one. This seems to be working well for all parties involved. Your manager asks these question because they want to keep it that way. They are proactively ...


5

Yes. At companies that have mandatory drug testing, they tend to do it as a fixed part of the onboarding process and don’t skip it because you were a contractor, or worked there before, or have a relative that works there, or... Even if it is not strictly mandated and they don’t do routine recurring testing, it’s usually simplest for them to follow the ...


4

When folks say "HR is not your friend", it doesn't mean "HR is your enemy". Some employees think that when things go wrong they can run to HR and get them fixed. HR doesn't do that; HR works to keep the "human relations" within the company functioning well - their focus is the company as a whole, not your particular concerns. ...


4

They gave you a contract to sign. That is as much certainty as anyone can have that the job is yours. It is understandable that you are worried, but you should have faith that they are just understaffed or dealing with other more pressing tasks, and that is why you have not heard back from them yet. That said, if you have not heard by lunchtime on Friday (...


4

Not a standard practice, but it has happened. Usually salary discussions should take place much earlier in the hiring process. But, in case they did not, IMHO, any question from HR regarding the salary should be met with question in response - what is this position budgeted for?


4

The only real outlet she has is to go to HR and file a report Well, not quite. In most situations, the first thing to do is to talk to that person (or group). Just tell them that you find this or that inappropriate, rude or whatever the situation might be. Ideally right away, but maybe soon after in private. Most of the time, that will be enough. If not on ...


3

First of all, congratulations on being assertive and proactive on this issue. Showing concern for your employees' comfort and wellbeing is important. If you look at my most recent question from last week, I was in an almost mirror situation as you. The internal employees support group is a great start. Often having peers and management recognize such issue ...


2

I've been on another side of this, where the 1st pick didn't work out and I got called back after previously being turned down. There really is no rhyme or reason for some things, only circumstances that can change for nearly any reason. It's likely not your fault, so move onto the next opportunity. This is one of the reasons why people on this stack say not ...


2

I'm guessing from both the name and the reference to call center jobs as BPO that you're not asking from the U.S.A. If you add the country we may be able to give more specific advice. Programming is not for me That's good. You figured out what you don't want to do, and stopped doing it! Other good news - you have a college degree. Next question - WHY! ...


2

Over and over on this site, I read the statement that "HR is not your friend". - Just focus into what is expected to talk in the 1:1 meeting and nothing else, specially nothing abstract Is this a real opportunity to freely talk about good and BAD things in the working place? - Yes, in particular things that affect positively and negatively your ...


1

Communication in all its forms is an important life-skill. Lack of it will hold you back. How would you prepare for any meeting? If there isn't a proper agenda then ask if there's anything you should bring with you. That asking is a nice way to say you're engaging with HR's process. Always appear positive. (If you're genuinely a nervous and lacking ...


1

"Oh hell yeah, at this point in my [koff, koff ...] career, I could tell you plenty of stories(!)" about companies who didn't do background checks and drug tests when they should have. (No, I'm not going to repeat them now. But, "you really don't want to know.") Companies have learned the very-hard way to conduct these tests at every ...


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