114

The general advice for this kind of situation is to present solutions to your bosses, not problems. "I don't have any work to do" is a problem. You're asking them to spend time and effort to solve this problem by finding work for you to do. (whether they ought to be doing that, given that this is a work study program, is neither here nor there. It ...


114

I wouldn't see it as a red flag. They might have missed it in the resume, people don't spend a long time reviewing these and could have looked more into the skills/experience section, depends on how clear it was from a quick skim through. It also could be that one person reviews submissions and shortlists candidates, then a different person is responsible ...


67

You do not have the right to speak to HR. HR is not your friend, don't treat them like one. HR is here to protect the company, not you. They will happily act like your friend, write down everything you say, and then report it to your old manager. Are you still excited to talk to HR? My former manager is putting pressure on my current manager to get me ...


52

Normally I would agree with the answers already posted and say "don't worry about it everything is fine", except that this person has already threatened to take action. If the other person simply said "don't do that, that's not right to say", then I would say do nothing, however the threat of going to HR makes me think you should do ...


40

Talk to your university. I'm not familiar with the particulars of French academia (and academia can vary more than many people think it does), but your university arranged this work/study program as a learning experience for you. If you're not doing anything productive or educational, then you're at risk of failing to meet the requirements that the ...


34

You do not have a right to speak to HR per se. However, you do have (as does every other employee in the UK), the right to be treated fairly at work. If you believe you are not being treated fairly at work, you have the right to raise a complaint about the treatment. UK companies (de facto) must have a procedure for dealing with complaints, and if the ...


30

Why would they ask? If you stated you can work May to August, and they need someone to start mid April, it is obvious that they would ask you if you could possibly start two weeks earlier. It is the old principle "if you don't ask, you won't get". It's fine to say "no". If they have five new employees arriving on 1st of May, they'd ask ...


12

HR Doesn't know the specifics of your own situation. While they may be interested in you as a candidate from the details of your resume and your interview, it's possible that you have forgotten that your preferred start date is on your resume - after all, I assume this isn't the only job you've applied to, and you may forget that you've listed a start date ...


11

Anecdotally, I have had two jobs where I provided a very clear start date and subsequently had HR ask if I could start earlier. On one occasion my new boss would be on vacation for my first 2 weeks and I was asked if I was available to start 3 days early so he could get on-boarding kicked-off and bring me up to speed before he left. On the other occasion ...


10

You may want to look at this Wikipedia page, which seems to describe what you're going through. I am not a lawyer and you may want to talk to one before proceeding, but based on this you seem to have a bunch of the telltale signs of Constructive Dismissal: In order to avoid such a breach "[a]n employer must not, without reasonable or proper cause, ...


9

You want to complain about a colleague whose faults are already well known higher up the hierarchy. Don't make a formal complaint. Despite the lengthy question you have nothing new to add to what people in actual positions of authority know and are working on mitigating against already. Your colleague is digging himself a hole, do not try and help him dig, ...


8

You have two separable objectives in this work placement: Gain as much useful knowledge and experience as you can. Meet your university's formal requirements. You should find out from your university one simple thing: what constitutes "official success/credit" for the work/study. If there is someone at the company who will need to certify to the ...


8

I emailed CS rep and said "If accounting director is pissy with you, you didn't do anything wrong". I also followed up with CS rep via phone to explain the current nightmare situation in accounting so he didn't feel like he did something wrong or caused a problem. Well, my "pissy" email got forwarded to accounting director in a ...


7

Go back to HR and explain that you are not able to contact her - she is not answering her phone when you call, although you did leave a message. Ask them if there is another way to get your apology to her. HR is the ones who wanted you to call, and you've tried that. They need to know that you've tried and what the result was. At this point, just be ...


7

First things first: check your employee handbook if this actually was okay. It might have been consensual, but "doing it" in the copier room is consensual too, but still gets both people fired. If it was against any policy, talk to your colleague and maybe get legal advice. Assuming it was okay and no policy was violated, write two emails: Write ...


7

You have a subject, that's at least something. What I would suggest is define yourself a goal. Let's say you're studying IA, you could set your sight on a AI tool like Tensor Flow and build something. Even just following a tutorial to learn the tool. Give you a day or two max to find something. Once you have define yourself a short, clear and achievable goal ...


6

I have taught both resume writing and job hunting strategies, here's the traditional wisdom: Don't chase trends. Eventually, they fall out of favor and count against you. Be prepared to tweak your resume to fit the job for which you are applying. While "trendy" resumes will get attention, they are just as likely to get bad, as good attention. A ...


5

Stating the facts isn't snitching. What else would you do? Make up a lie? I requested that the maintenance department deliver the boxes to my room. They haven't been delivered yet. I have followed up with them and am waiting to hear back.


5

Is it possible that I am in a blacklist? Yes. Many companies track candidates and there is often a check box for "consider for other roles?" which can say either yes or no. Some companies do this, others do not. This would depend a lot on how your last interaction went and if you manage to seriously annoy someone in the process. Personally, I ...


4

Sorry you're having difficulty. I don't know how things are in France, but I did a similar program in the US and learned a great deal, some of which had nothing to do with my field of study (engineering). In fact, the most useful things I learned were about dealing with different managers and co-workers, so you have an opportunity to learn here. Here's a ...


4

Not necessarily complete, but you want to: Convey contact details. Show that you can write a formal letter without fucking up formalities (which you will do implicitly by writing it). If you had prior communication, mention it: "thank you for our wonderful conversation when we met at xyz.". Same if you have a contact within the company who has ...


4

It's company specific whether you are or not, but it's certainly a likely scenario if you are qualified and there is no other reason to ignore you. You wasted company time and resources in the past, many companies would note that down.


4

is it foolish to turn down the offer from this mid sized company for a contingent offer? No. It's a perfectly rational decision. is it risky to wait a month or two for an official offer after a contingent offer Only a little. It seems that the large company is on the ball and communicating well, so the likelihood of them going back is small. Nothing is ...


3

At this point you have done what you can and it's time to move on. Carefully document the steps that you have taken, review then with HR and have HR either confirm in writing that they are satisfied or give you specific & actionable alternatives. Repeat until HR confirms that you are done. Then continue life as if nothing had happened and assume that the ...


3

You should make sure to check with your friend if they're okay with using their name in your message. If it's okay, briefly mention it at the start of the email like this. Dear [HR Person Name], [Friend] provided me with your contact details, and I'm writing you to inquire about an internship at [Company Name]. ... The usefulness of this differs depending ...


3

Two points I don't yet see made: The complaining coworker might not trying to protect you particularly (since as far as we can tell from your question, she does not know you well) but might just like causing HR incidents for whatever reason. Just tell the helpful coworker that if anything comes of the situation, you are ready to testify that no offence or ...


3

Unless you know for sure that these jobs are for same positions from the same (geographically distributed) team - it's ok to apply for multiple positions. Based on your preference and their acceptance, you can choose any one, if you land on multiple offers. Usually the pay-scale can vary based on location - so I do not see any downside for these applications....


2

As others pointed out here, HR is protecting the company based on policies. If you want them to go into your favor, then you need to show something they have to react on to protect the company from a possible lawsuit or fine. For example, if you have a clear message that they want to fire you because of your gender, then that is something HR will have to ...


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