239

Is there something we could do? Having your wife report to you directly and sit in the same office (regardless of the size) is highly irregular in my experience and, sadly for you, a legit spot for HR to be concerned. I have worked with my wife in the past, but she was in a separate department and had a separate reporting structure. Also, my current boss'...


193

Lord forgive me, but I am actually on HR's side this time. Your arrangement is an HR office's worst nightmare.... Nepotism Fraternization Liability for lawsuits... Having a spouse be a direct report to her manager.... They are not engaging in sabotage, they are engaging in self-preservation. The myriad of lawsuits to which this makes the company ...


150

While I won't answer the original problem directly I wish to tackle something tangent to this. And I feel it is important enough to warrant an answer and not a comment. From a comment (and the post) it is established that GPL'ed code is modified and distributed, without distributing also the modifications: We are selling a product with a "custom linux ...


142

This situation is spiraling out of control out of anger and frustration. I can't speak to the legal aspect, but it should not have gotten to this stage. You basically gave him nothing in negotiation and then now that he wants to leave, you are acting to trap him in his current position. He is a wounded animal fighting back. The promotion (we'd consider ...


78

It sounds like you already used your position to give someone you're married to a position at the company she may not have gotten otherwise, and now HR wants to make sure you two are physically separated to ensure she's working properly by herself. HR is protecting the company's interests. It is very nepotistic to have a husband convince a manager to hire ...


78

I know you did not ask anything on behalf of yourself but humanitarian considerations compel me to strongly advise you to avoid hanging around anywhere near the ass end of your company because that is where it is about to be badly bitten. Your company has made some serious blunders. Not only have they irreparably mangled their relations with their ...


55

"Why would I sign this?" You would not. No advantage accrues to you from agreeing to a gag order. "Should I tell them they can drop their investigation?" No. That's none of your business, really. Anyway, HR has rules they must follow. "...what's the best way to decline?" "I am not going to sign that." The natural human impulse to avoid hurting the ...


44

Don’t retaliate against Francis. Talk to a lawyer. Your company has been breaking the law with regard to your violations of the GPL, and now one of your employees wants to become a whistleblower. You’re already going to be in enough legal problems from your violations of copyright law; the last thing you want is to get in even more trouble from breaking ...


29

Yes, this is very OK. If you have any questions about the post, it is better to ask for more information than submit an application and it ended up being a waste of yours and the recruiter's time. As an expat working in the Netherlands, I'd just add a point of caution: make sure that the information you're asking for clarification is indeed not written in ...


26

I don't know if HR is sabotaging your wife's chances at getting the permanent position or not, I do know this whole situation should have never seen the light of day, to begin with! You got your wife the position, not in an "I'll pass your CV around and hope something sticks", but literally, got her the position. And on a new product, none the less, which ...


21

If an employer provides contact information, it's done with the expectation that you may want to contact them. And, given the example questions you've posted, it seems like you have a legitimate need to contact them - these are typical questions that a candidate may want to clear with HR prior to applying for a job, and if the answers aren't specified in the ...


20

This is not your decision. Do not threaten someone legally if you're not a lawyer. The only person making legal threats, implied or otherwise, should be your legal team. Also, this is not an HR decision. This is a strategic decision that has to be decided by upper management in conjunction with its legal team. As an HR person, your role is to make sure ...


18

P and only P should do the following: File a formal complaint against G for yelling and threatening him over the documents. File a separate formal complaint against G for not following the company's secure print procedures ( which resulted in multiple copies left at the printer unattended ). Talk to the company's security to determine who picked up the ...


17

In general, when speaking to HR, should it be paid for or done during a paid word day? Since this is a work-related issue, it should be performed "on the clock" and you should be paid. Find an on the clock time that works for both of you. Propose that you speak with them during that time period. Make sure that you are providing enough time to meet their ...


15

I'm going to take a slightly different tack than the other answers here, but arrive at a similar conclusion. First of all, getting a job for your friend or relative is not "highly irregular" especially if your company isn't one of those with really formal and strict rules and regulations. Often jobs are obtained because the boss is looking for someone with ...


13

I'd just go to your boss (the COO) and tell him your concern. Do realize however that this is a highly unusual arrangement: it's usually considered extremely inappropriate and grounds for immediate termination if a manager is in a romantic relationship with a subordinate. And while it isn't impermissible fraternization as you were married prior to her ...


13

This is absolutely none of your business. It is not your responsibility to "call out" the CFO's behavior. It is between him and your manager. You have NOTHING to do with it. You aren't his conscience, mentor, personal coach, or parent. Sit down, do your job, and stay out of it. If you have discomfort? Well, I hate to break it to you, but life is full ...


9

I think you may be over-reacting and/or being over-sensitive. I will explain why I think so: Whether something is inappropriate or not is subjective and if you weren't the subject of the comment, why not brush it off and continue as normal? If your manager found the comment inappropriate then they may or may not choose to raise it with the CFO. The problem ...


8

Rule of thumb: When in doubt, always ask. The company (if a sensible one) will appreciate your efforts for calling them to confirm the eligibility, which saves a lot of time and effort for both the sides. If I get a negative response / vibe for calling a prospective employer up for legitimate reasons, I'll think twice to even make an application.


8

"Is this normal to ask an employee to do like this?" Considering we're taking about the unplanned and emergency leaves: This is not normal (I've never heard or experienced something like this), I think this is absurd, and should be questioned. You can do couple of things: Ask the HR for the definition of "emergency" and define the boundaries. To some ...


7

Any and/or all of the following apply Teambuilding Conflict resolution Mentoring Soft skills


7

The general line is: personal data shall be kept for no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which it is being processed. So if they still happen to be looking at your CV for matches, then they can keep it, otherwise they have to bin it. However, the real question here is whether they're stil actively looking at your CV or not for matches, ...


6

What is that skill called? Based on your description, I would describe that skill or attribute as empathic. From Oxford's: The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. Empathetic people have a tendency to put themselves into "other's shoes", meaning they can perceive and understand well the feelings and postures others have. This is a ...


6

In theory, your wife is competing with other employees for this job. This is very detrimental to our productivity. Imagine if you had a different product manager working on the same project, let's call that person Julie or Bret. Would you have Julie or Bret sit in your office all the time? If that is indeed the case, my apologies, but let me ask you a ...


6

Any meeting should be billable time. The rule of thumb I use is "would I be doing this if I wasn't at work?". If the answer is no, then I charge for it. So for example, things like eating lunch, or going to the gym are not billable time, even if they happen during work hours. Administrative meetings (for example with HR) are billable time. You're only ...


5

Is there value in recruitment messages? Short answer: actually, no. Long answer: (see below). I'm assuming it is a weak fact to vouch for a raise or promotion Your assumption is very good. Even worse, the company might become "sad" that you are not loyal enough, and not treat you adequately as a result. can sharing an information like "I'm actively ...


5

Assuming you are really telling us the truth and your performance is good, but the head of HR is badmouthing you anyway. You don't have much of a choice. You need to find yourself a new employer as soon as possible. The head of HR has a lot of power. He can block all your avenues of advancement and potentially can even get you fired. And trying to gain ...


5

Anecdotally, I used my first job to gain experience, and my second job to get paid what I wanted. From what I've seen and read, getting a job with a different company is the best way to increase salary even if your company is not ripping you off that badly. What you're describing would be criminal or at least highly suspicious here in the US. Are you ...


5

What would be a good way to solve this without breaking the relationship with the company, Unfortunately, in most cases the only way to solve this is to break the relationship with the company. The company received a bargain when they hired you at well below the market standard. You might receive small raises every now and then, but you will always remain ...


5

First: a big thank you for taking action and it's good to see that companies can learn, take the right decisions and remove such persons if honest people give feedback risking their career. You already made the world a slightly better place, and I am not sure that you actually have an obligation to do more. Since you asked about the possibilities my ...


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