180

How common is this type of job interview? Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? That's pretty unusual and would be a red flag for me. Interviewing is a two way street. In order for a hire to be successful, the candidate must be a good fit for the role, but the role and the culture must also be a good fit ...


46

I would say this kind of interview is very uncommon, and with good reason. Usually a job interview is so that both parties get a feel for one another. If it ends up more like a interrogation, then the interviewer won't know everything they should about the candidate. Of course, the candidate doesn't know whether or not they should take the job. You know more ...


35

I'm not defending the company here, and honestly, this sounds like terrible interview practice. But, one possible explanation could be that this was a pool interview. In other words, there are X possible roles available within the company (possibly for different departments), and they are using the interview to figure out which, if any, you would be a good ...


19

TL;DR: It might be an Assessment-Center In some large German companies, there is the process of an "Assessment-Center" (yes, the english term is used in german). I was lucky enough to avoid them in my career, and they are frowned upon by many. These are no regular interviews, but maybe this wasn't clearly presented to you. It might be that the HR ...


17

That is super unusual. It might be acceptable when the job in question is highly standardized, maybe unionized, maybe limited in time. For example, cleaning tables at a big fast food chain over the summer. They have this opening, it's not very flexible, they have lots of candidates and they are only looking for one or two to accept it as is with no hassle. ...


12

Ethics varies with the context, and often has a personal and cultural baggage. So what is ethical to you may be unethical for someone else under different circumstances. Let's take the example you have given and consider it from the perspective of a corporate environment. Suppose I wanted to promote someone from my team. But my boss doesn't like them for ...


8

HR is not aware of this, and I’m tempted to tell them. Don't. It's not your problem, you will damage relationships, you might make a fool out of yourself and it's not going to make anything "better" for anyone. I think you have a significant misconception about the interviewing process. It's NOT like a college test: questions with right/wrong ...


6

I can think of two good reasons why your employer may want you to talk to their occupational therapist. To determine what you will and won't be able to do when you return to work. To determine whether or not they need to make any adjustments to your workplace while you recover from your injury.


5

I hope that this type of job interview is not common. In my field we have a shortage of skilled candidates in Germany. From the employer's perspective it's not only important to get to know the candidate, but it's also important to make a good impression on the candidate. As team leader I'm interviewing candidates at least twice a month. We usually structure ...


5

Quite common if they are hiring in bulk Unfortunately, this is a common situation with some companies, not only in Germany but elsewhere. To put it simple, company is usually well known, and reputable in its field. Think Mercedes-Benz or Bosch. They do not have to be that big, but is expected from candidates to already know about them (unless they were ...


3

You also interview the company. Company also asks questions that you answer all the time. That is not a reason for you to tell a company: During the interview I will not be taking questions. I will provide a list of all the questions you might ask as a company after the interview Why would you do such thing? Or a company? They think their time is more ...


2

Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? I have no idea if this was the rationale for your interview, but one of my associates just went through a US military contractor interview that had a couple of similarities. In this interview there were no questions at all (it was to be a live prepared presentation ...


2

Like the others, I also think it's quite weird and I never encountered this behaviour during an interview myself. However here are the reasons I can think of why a company would behave like this. They have dozens/hundreds interviews more to do and are on a really tight schedule. They indeed think that a job interview is a oneway street where they get to ...


1

Knowledge of the Job itself may be Confidential Information This kind of secrecy is not uncommon in very large corporations and or in situations were chains of non-disclosure are too complex for the interviewer to know exactly what he can and can not tell you. One example where I've seen something like this was an interview I had with Microsoft several years ...


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