We changed our privacy policy. Read more.
245

Let me preface this by saying that I am in several "protected groups" and have dealt with workplace discrimination based on that. Including having been told that "They shouldn't be allowed to hire people like you" So, understand that I am not unsympathetic. I then mentioned "wow, can't be that hard being a privileged white male, ...


180

How common is this type of job interview? Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? That's pretty unusual and would be a red flag for me. Interviewing is a two way street. In order for a hire to be successful, the candidate must be a good fit for the role, but the role and the culture must also be a good fit ...


168

There are a whole pile of reasons: To meet HR policy. Some companies just require that at least X number of people be interviewed for any position. I worked for a bank that required several people be interviewed even if a candidate had already been chosen or even had been specifically headhunted. To make a preferred candidate look good. A friend of mine ...


141

I would suggest that you don't write an e-mail where you specifically mention the salary. However, a more general follow-up e-mail might be a good idea. Dear ..., Thanks again for the interesting and informative phone call. I really got a great impression of your company. The tasks seem very interesting and challenging and the environment is great, too. I am ...


129

'HR is not your friend' is a statement that's often repeated to mean that HR's job is to protect the interests of the company rather than yours. Therefore if you have some issue in your workplace and go to HR, keep in mind that they won't prioritise helping you if it creates some conflict with the company's interests. That said, there are plenty of ...


116

The general advice for this kind of situation is to present solutions to your bosses, not problems. "I don't have any work to do" is a problem. You're asking them to spend time and effort to solve this problem by finding work for you to do. (whether they ought to be doing that, given that this is a work study program, is neither here nor there. It ...


115

I wouldn't see it as a red flag. They might have missed it in the resume, people don't spend a long time reviewing these and could have looked more into the skills/experience section, depends on how clear it was from a quick skim through. It also could be that one person reviews submissions and shortlists candidates, then a different person is responsible ...


113

Most decent companies use a “band” when looking at experience, they ask for 5 years and may accept 3 with other factors. Put 36 months and explain at interview if you get one. Any good HR will be able to look at the experience and decide.


106

Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to a human if you get an interview I rarely say this. But in this case, you have what a human would regard as 3 years of experience. A human will understand. A computer regards 35.75 months experience as identical to 24.0 months. Obviously this is wrong. Lie to the computer - but tell the truth to any human you talk ...


103

It's impossible for us to know exactly what occurred. What we do know is that every sign seemed good, until the point where you provided your previous salaries. It's possible they realised they could not afford you, and instead elected to look elsewhere. In the future, make sure that salary expectations are managed from the start - just in case this was the ...


93

Sometimes, life is complicated. Sometimes two rules conflict - the one that says you're not allowed to make up reasonable data but must rerun the tedious process, and the one that says the company won't get paid (or will get fined, or something) if the data isn't submitted on time. Bosses are sometimes in a position to make decisions like this when the ...


92

Simple rule of thumb: always talk to your manager first. I know you didn't mean it in this case, but by going directly to HR, you're implicitly saying to your manager "I don't think you would help me here". Your manager is there to resolve problems, whether they be technical problems, people problems, equipment problems, or whatever else.


85

There is already a great answer on this, but I just want to add my perspective, in the hope that it may help you in future situations. Your question is very aggressive sounding. Even your question Title is attacking "white men". It's sexist and racist. Why does race and gender matter here? From the way you write, it sounds like you are attacking ...


76

An interview is a 2-way street. Make sure they don't have a revolving door of employees. I think the question they meant to ask was The last person left after 6 months, how do we know you'll stay longer? Ask how long the last person stayed and why they left. This company may have management issues that turns it into a revolving door. Ask more questions ...


67

if I send it I'm in a weaker negotiating position. Yes you would be. Before negotiating you should be prepared and then stand or fall by your words. You're best just waiting. Pay is just one of several factors they'll be looking at. It's a given that they can offer less without you telling them. but I elaborated that I think I deserve it because of my ...


67

You do not have the right to speak to HR. HR is not your friend, don't treat them like one. HR is here to protect the company, not you. They will happily act like your friend, write down everything you say, and then report it to your old manager. Are you still excited to talk to HR? My former manager is putting pressure on my current manager to get me ...


63

If I were you, I would contact an employment lawyer specializing in discrimination cases and ask them to write an evidence "preservation letter" to the legal counsel of your company. For a sample letter, see page 74 on this PDF document. (That sample letter is Ontario-specific, but an employment lawyer in your jurisdiction should know how to tailor ...


58

This bonus was something your company paid to you because they thought you should have the money. If the bonus was to be split, your company would have split it between the two of you and not left it to you to somehow share. Your company thinks you earned it. Otherwise you would not have the money. This bonus is for referral alone. It is not for helping the ...


55

I am not sure how I should feel about this. Disappointed. Is this a standard practice? That depends what you mean by "standard". It's uncommon, but not unheard of. Stuff happens. What is a standard response in such a case? The only thing to do is to move on and find your next job.


54

Normally I would agree with the answers already posted and say "don't worry about it everything is fine", except that this person has already threatened to take action. If the other person simply said "don't do that, that's not right to say", then I would say do nothing, however the threat of going to HR makes me think you should do ...


53

I conduct the occasional technical interview at my company for peer roles. What I've noticed is that people seem to think of the interviewer side as almost omniscient, that everything we do is highly calculated and purposeful. The truth is the hiring process is difficult on all sides. Maybe the person who wrote the job description was different than the ...


51

Standard escalation is: Your coworker Your manager HR (With manager's knowledge) Yes, there are exceptions, but these are the standard. HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND This isn't high school, and you aren't reporting a fellow student to the principal's office. HR is normally the LAST resort, not the first. Do not do this in the future, you will earn a reputation ...


47

TLDR: HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND For a six month status meeting, you should just focus on how you are getting along and any tools and or assistance you need to make you more productive. Keep it positive, and have solutions ready for any problems you wish to address A one-on-one with HR is not like sitting down with a friend and talking about all the problems ...


46

There are two questions here but only one is relevant. How do I deal with him handing off to me? Professionally. Basically start fresh. “Good afternoon, John. What do we have today?” He gives the handoff, you ask whatever legitimate questions you need to clarify and ensure you have the information you need. Basic closed loop communication, which everyone ...


46

I would say this kind of interview is very uncommon, and with good reason. Usually a job interview is so that both parties get a feel for one another. If it ends up more like a interrogation, then the interviewer won't know everything they should about the candidate. Of course, the candidate doesn't know whether or not they should take the job. You know more ...


40

Talk to your university. I'm not familiar with the particulars of French academia (and academia can vary more than many people think it does), but your university arranged this work/study program as a learning experience for you. If you're not doing anything productive or educational, then you're at risk of failing to meet the requirements that the ...


38

If you know and feel you have done nothing wrong nothing that violates company policies nothing that violates ethics in general sense Nothing to worry. Don't jump into the conclusion before you get to see / know the full picture / story. Attend the meeting with HR, listen to what they have to say and if They try to accuse you based on some unconfirmed ...


38

What is the best way to report this kind of finding? What are the likely impacts to the career/employmeent of V in this case? I think your friend needs to re-think their approach to this case. Reporting this kind of finding would be the last step that they would take. If V is really concerned about these findings then V should speak to the person who ran ...


37

If you get a question in an interview that you don't fully understand, ask for clarification. Interviewing is a two way process, clear communication is vital because it's only a short period to assess within.


37

It’s just the entire process of who owns the Referral bonus in this specific instance and should splitting the bonus or handing over the bonus to referree, where it was not agreed in advance, constitute the correct decision? Do referrer needs to make the referral that results in employment to technically deserve the referral bonus? The way referral bonuses ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible