New answers tagged

0

Unless you truly did make a mistake or truly "dropped the ball" in terms of working with this coworker, I wouldn't be so fast in taking responsibility for the damaged relationship. Now, if your coworker's behavior really is "out of the blue" as your narrative indicates, then here's what I'd suggest: Assume your coworker has an axe to ...


-1

You move forward with it by accepting that you are the actual problem in many ways. You have a damaged relationship, and in order to get started, you have to forget how it got damaged. You have to accept that it is damaged, and you have a responsibility to repair it. This sounds incredibly unfair on the surface. You feel you're not at fault for it. You feel ...


4

Setting aside that the fact that probably 99% of all internal company videos are drek, I think that even if you've got a budding Steven Speilberg in your ranks or have something professionally produced it's still a poor way to achieving your goals here. Remote on-boarding being impersonal is not going to be reduced by watching pre-recorded footage - you're ...


0

Forget about the background check. You have two offers, decide which of those offers is best for you and accept only that offer and reject the other one. If I signed the second offer without rejecting the first offer, I am wondering if both companies would be able to find out that I signed two offers? Both companies can find out through any number of ways ...


2

I think I read somewhere, that as a new manager you will have 100 days to arrive, settle, shake hands, do the 1:1s and analyze your environment. Stakeholders, peers, reports, targets, structure and processes. After 100 days it is expected that you are clearly present/visible as the head of that team/department/branch etc.. and your reports report to you as ...


1

I don't think the background check company would tell their business partner. Because: If the background check company leak the information, then it would be challenged. Background check company they themselves emphasize privacy, they would not do anything hurt their reputation.


1

I can only guess here, as I am not associated with "First Advantage". But cashing in twice about the same work, sounds like a good thing (for "First Advantage"). However you never know what happens there and what agreements are in place. If you would be open to all parties, that you are currently comparing offers, this would be just fine. ...


7

After three failed attempts take the hint and stop asking. The fact that no one has contacted you in nearly two months is your answer. Unfortunately, not everyone at HR is polite enough or has the time to inform each and every candidate whether they have been hired or have passed the first hurdle.


15

The role probably isn't available and they are just unwilling to say no. It isn't all that unusual when a job is no longer available. Saying no to people is unpleasant, so plenty are unwilling to do it. Many people also do not react well to being told no, so silence or false promises can reduce anguish. You are very unlikely to get the job. Move on to ...


0

It's difficult to sell such a concept. Ideally you actually have a viable service before you start cold-contacting people. This would mean having suitably qualified/certified people to do the work in specific languages. Some govts retain similar businesses to help interact with their consultants, but private industry seems less likely to. A least that's how ...


2

"Personal performance" meaning how he rates your performance or just how well you're able to perform? If taken literally, I suppose repeatedly emailing the wrong person could negatively effect your ability to do your job. If he means how he rates your performance, you might say it's a threat but certainly not blackmail. Blackmail means coercing ...


5

If you keep sending emails to the wrong person, it will affect your personal performance. This is what you say: "Regarding my vacation days, I was just following his specific instructions. My apologies for not letting you know the context of why I was carbon copying him." In other words, you assume the best possible interpretation of his last ...


4

Welcome new user. Honestly that is not "blackmail". I would describe it as "rude" and "unprofessional". You need to be "even more professional", set aside the rudeness, and carry on professionally. How to answer? Just reply "Dear Steve, sorry about that. Actually Frank told me to cc him regarding vacation days. ...


6

If you're in the US, today is Memorial Day (and in the UK, it's a bank holiday). That means that many people get today off, and when many people get the Monday off, they also take the preceding Friday off, and some people even take the preceding Thursday and Friday off to get a 5-day weekend. So if a manager/decision-maker is required to approve your ...


3

You've already mentioned it and the very senior person most probably knows your situation. That's valuable information for people who are interested in employing you, but by stressing it too much you're risking being perceived as having unrealistic expectations. They expedited the process for you already, there's not so much they can do apart from that. I ...


1

For my understanding, you could do that in following scenario: You already finish the current interview, and you mention that for salary negotiation. You just tell the truth, for telling the interview you would like to compare two offers. So they can have a preparation before. You are obvious the best fit for the position, and don't mind your interviewer ...


0

Attempting to pressure a potential employer to expedite their interview process likely will not end well for you. Your request is also a bit unreasonable and I can see them being annoyed with you and dropping you from consideration unless you currently stand out well above any of the other potential candidates. Just like you, the company would want to make ...


14

Asking them to make a quick decision might work. It might not. What it does do is potentially speed up the process. The risk is that if they have many good candidates they see no harm is quickly saying no. Of course if you don't ask, and they take too long then you won't be able to use their offer in your decision process. I want to know if I should tell ...


9

This is just the well-known "Total scam" or "Oil visa scam" https://www.total.uk/fraudulent-job-offers-name-total (They just use the name of any old major oil company .. Exxon, whatever.) It's the most well-known scam in the middle-east, India, etc and it's the most well-known visa scam. For goodness sake, IT'S A SCAM.


20

This is likely a scam. The UAE has this website devoted to helping identify scams and visa fraud. Among the items of that site: If somebody offers you a job in the UAE, he/she has to give you an offer letter issued by the UAE’s Ministry of Human Resources and Emiratisation (MOHRE). The prospective employees/candidates can verify the job offer’s validity at ...


3

How do I handle this? You don't. You weren't there and you shouldn't interfere because it's not your responsibility and you only have one side of a story. When you refer someone it's up to them to create a good impression and all the rest. Your involvement after the referral should not be necessary and has a potential to work against you. You're basically ...


8

Call the hiring manager. Tell him what happened in the broadest terms. I used to work for HR (as an intern) at a well-known national laboratory a very long time ago. What the recruiter did would have been unacceptable in our organization. Resumes that came in with referrals from internal employees would have been passed on to the hiring manager, no matter ...


5

Many states in the US have at-will employment. In those, an employer can fire you at any time for almost any reason or no reason at all. It is thus entirely within their power to state and promulgate a "no bullying" policy and then proceed to fire people for not adhering to it. For those places where employment is more contractually protected, ...


1

I agree with @Captain Emacs on "Should there be a reason why I would do that?" This can identify the issue which can be about management issues etc. so you can stay fully prepared before starting here. If they don't give you a reason, it's likely a question to judge your plans. Do you plan your future with this firm or are you already looking for ...


2

There are already many good answers, I'd like to add that to me this seems like one of those (odd) soft questions to see what type of person/team member you are. Your answer, on a scale of "start looking for my replacement" with a "that's not my problem" attitude, to "I wouldn't leave my coworkers hanging or ruin a project by leaving ...


0

As most/all other answers have said: mind your own business and do as you're told. This is obviously assuming that there is no actual damage (i.e., this is not in a medical company where the faked test results would lead to wrong dosages for important medications, and such). Not only is it possible that the boss knows more than you know; it could also be ...


7

I understood that question as "do you document what you are doing" (or leave other traces specific to the field you are in - such as lab notes or something. This is not a bad question (the wording is a bit off, though). Answering that "you obviously do not plan to, but in any case, you work in a way where there is traceability, documentation ...


0

Now would be the perfect opportunity to discuss the concept of a retention bonus. The company pays you an agreed upon amount before your start working (let us say $100,000). You keep the $100,000 but agree to give it back on certain conditions (for example, you quit within 6 months). Then the answer becomes the company claws back their $100,000.


25

If your resume contains many short appointments this is an invitation to assuage their fears you'll be out the door the moment you've finished training. For example, maybe you did a bunch of short-term contract work and they'd like to be reassured that you were there for six months because that's what the client wanted and agreed upfront. If this job is ...


2

This is a valid question. If you are an expert in the field they are asking you to recommend a peer. Your leaving is a real risk, even if slight. Death, disability, detention, that sort of thing comes out of the blue. Even without armed conflict, even without pandemics. By all means reassure them of your intentions, but do not cave early on any negotiations. ...


0

Mind your own business and do what your job is to do. Don't bother what others do or don't unless it directly affects your job. Definitely, there will be consequences and your friend's work-life will be affected for sure moving forward if he/she choose to report the boss.


0

Based on your description of the job I don't see any ethical dilemma. V should run the tests and report the result. It's not V's job or responsibility to check other peoples results. The best and safest thing to do is to just ignore it, and stop looking for other employees errors. If V should run the same tests and get different results V should just report ...


12

What sort of position were you applying for? Your profile says that you are a PhD student so it is possible that your position would be relatively unique within the company and that a strategy to improve your "bus factor" would be important. There is a big difference between being commodity developer 398 of 400 or being the super-specialized ...


37

If you get a question in an interview that you don't fully understand, ask for clarification. Interviewing is a two way process, clear communication is vital because it's only a short period to assess within.


76

An interview is a 2-way street. Make sure they don't have a revolving door of employees. I think the question they meant to ask was The last person left after 6 months, how do we know you'll stay longer? Ask how long the last person stayed and why they left. This company may have management issues that turns it into a revolving door. Ask more questions ...


3

It's reasonably unlikely you're going to get a clear answer here. The law is interpreted by the courts, which take into consideration the specifics of a particular case. When we try to determine what a company may or may not do, we look to legal precedent to inform our opinions. This is because companies often do the same. Obviously the pandemic presents a ...


9

My question is can my work enforce this health and safety rule on employees outside of the workplace and working hours? They're not trying to do that. If meeting with other members of staff indoors, then you must follow the office procedures and maintain social distancing. As a clear example, do you think this message is also intended to apply to a ...


11

The best way to report the problem is not to report the specific problem but the general underlying problem with the system that allows specific problems to happen and not get detected. This also helps reduce and prevent the likelihood of retaliation since the manager is not being called out on their actions. Quality Assurance (QA) This is where quality ...


38

What is the best way to report this kind of finding? What are the likely impacts to the career/employmeent of V in this case? I think your friend needs to re-think their approach to this case. Reporting this kind of finding would be the last step that they would take. If V is really concerned about these findings then V should speak to the person who ran ...


12

Each level of authority and responsibility have its own horizon view of things and level of responsibility. IMHO, it is not your friend`s business to analyze and address behavior of his boss His job is to do the job - sorry or redundant wording


93

Sometimes, life is complicated. Sometimes two rules conflict - the one that says you're not allowed to make up reasonable data but must rerun the tedious process, and the one that says the company won't get paid (or will get fined, or something) if the data isn't submitted on time. Bosses are sometimes in a position to make decisions like this when the ...


1

The first company agreed to have a contract for you by Friday (I'm assuming you meant May 14, 2021). As of this writing, it's Sunday, May 16, 2021. The company has already slipped on carrying out its own proposal to you re an official offer letter. Since they've had enough time already to do three interviews with you (AND prepare to hire someone from a ...


1

It's impossible for us to know what's going on with HR. What I will tell you is that in my experience, HR processes are slow. And I would also say that the HR process is not always indicative of other areas of the business. (In other words, poor HR performance is not a "red flag" in my opinion). In any case, I'm inclined to believe them that it ...


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