New answers tagged

4

You have an offer for a new job. If that offer is better than your old job, then figure out what your notice period is, and accept the offer. With that done, you have the choice: a. Go to your old company and give notice. b. Go to your old company and ask for payment for these three days. If they don’t pay you give notice. If they pay, you put the money in ...


2

Short answer: You can fight, and probably win compensation for the time lost, but it may not be worth it. Longer answer: In all practical terms, it will likely cost you more to fight for it. Ask politely for the money, as the suspension was not justified. If you get it, great, if not, I recommend you just move on to the new job you've accepted. The ...


14

If he didn't offer you compensation, you do not have a normal professional relationship. You have been cheated of three days of pay. Your company evidently is not careful about making accusations if they can badly pull a report and not be bothered to check that they generated it correctly before they put you on suspension. That is a bad sign. Apologies are ...


25

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


3

You should ask for compensation for that unwarranted suspension period. Placing someone on unpaid suspension for a suspected error may or may not be legal or allowed by your contract or local employment laws. If they choose not to pay you, you may want to contact an employment lawyer to see if they are required to pay you. Regardless of if they pay you or ...


0

often behind schedule Is the word 'often' fair? If it was only one project, and you were on schedule for the others, you'd be right to disagree. Estimation is hard. You could comment on what you've learned from that project, or just learn from it and move on. often fail to be at my desk during the entirely of core hours This is more of a problem, as ...


-3

Press agree and prepare your exit plan You got some useful feedback, now wipe the slate clean and restart with a fresh reputation at a new company.


2

If you have opportunity and appropriate rapport, I’d suggest talking with the reviewer first rather than just assuming. But it sounds likely that the major example to which you speak is front and center in the review. Done right, it might help you a bit to respond along the lines of what you’re asking. It demonstrates that you are giving thought to the ...


6

I did not properly communicate this technology change to other team members, and their expectations were that project should be completed sooner on my part, not later like it turned out to be. It sounds like there's a legitimate issue here, so it's not clear what there is to disagree with or comment on. Speaking with your manager and assuring him/her that ...


5

Agree and move on. That's not an overly negative performance review (completing tasks thoroughly is a good thing!) and you acknowledge it's at least broadly accurate in regards to this particular project. Accept it and learn from the experience. The more you try to comment on it, the more you're likely to seem like you're shirking responsibility, and that ...


0

Why would you escalate the situation? IMHO, notify your direct manager and use your vacation time until the end of the 2019 This way, entire issue is moot. This will also allow your manager to reach out to you with plan for vacation usage in other ways, and you will have a paper trail for your options


4

You are in a sticky situation. IF your employer transitioned your place of employment, which they should have, then you are now governed under those states laws. However, if the company has most of their people in CA their 'policy' may be to pay out vacation now matter where you live. Remote workers provide interesting problems for companies, especially ...


43

You've received several good answers, but I feel there is an important point that hasn't been emphasized enough. Hiring managers are generally looking for individuals with the skills to complete job tasks, but also for individuals who will be happy, productive, and (ideally) long-term team members. That's hard to ask directly about in an interview, so ...


3

If you have access to a copy of the company's employee handbook (or similar document), you may want to review it to see if there is any policy regarding rehires. Some companies won't rehire as a general policy, some will rehire as long as you weren't fired or forced to resign, and some might not care at all. An employer of mine had a paragraph dictating that ...


60

I'm wondering should I even bother? Do HRs have some sort of employee blacklist? It's unlikely that you are on a blacklist, but certainly both HR and the hiring manager will know that a year ago you left your 2-month stint. Just be sure to have an excellent answer to the inevitable question of "why did you leave us before?" Make sure your answer is clear,...


23

Apply. They'll notice your stint on your resume as soon as they glance at your resume anyway. Let them make the decision. At one company I was at, one Vice President was famous for driving away his underlings, and no one blamed his underlings for quitting. In fact in that specific case, surviving more than one week under him was seen as a net positive by ...


5

I've seen people quit and rejoin the same organization (even the same division) many times, unless you were fired for any breach of contract, in general no one holds grudges for leaving the company. As you mentioned, last time you were dissatisfied with your boss, not the overall company policy and/or work culture - so I do not see any downside in applying ...


138

What’s the downside of applying again? If you apply and get declined, the end result is you wouldn’t work there. If you don’t apply, you also would end up not working there.


0

In my experience, right after the shake up is when you want to try to get your move - I wouldn't wait. I've managed teams for about 11 years now. If someone goes to HR first, that would either really tick me off, or make me feel bad, depending on whether I knew there was an issue or not. And as an executive, I know you'd be labeled as a trouble maker. (I ...


2

You're on a visible high-stakes project now. Yes, it's unpleasant: it's a lonely slog through a tech-debt swamp. You've asked for help and gotten it, but your helper hasn't yet come on board fully. It's obviously frustrating. With respect, this kind of ugly project reflects the real world of software engineering. May I suggest you treat it as a career ...


2

-One possibility is to outsource the departement to a country with lower minimum wages. also, if legal, one can allow the workers to do more paid work, so they can get a living wage by working more hours tax free benefits (if legal) like a transportation subscription might be win-win subsidised food in the canteen Also the notion that increase is ...


6

My question now is: in what order should I ask various stakeholders to change to a different sub-team? I don't think there's a formalized process for this at the company -- perhaps I should try to check with our HR first? Since you don't appear to know/understand the proper protocol at your company, your first visit should be with HR, to ask about it....


0

This is how it usually works. You earn a certain amount of holidays over a year. During half a year you earn half that. If you leave the company, they have to pay you for the accrued leave that you haven't taken yet, or you have to pay back the money for leave that you have taken that wasn't accrued yet. (In the USA, you need to be careful because some ...


16

What I found is that the workers are not satisfied with their wages Is this ever not found in a company? Who does not think they should get a raise? So what would be the best way to approach this problem from a human resources perspective? The most logical thing would be to work on issues related to emotional salary, but I would like to hear other ...


21

Hire 14 year-olds and replace them with new 14 year-olds every year. (examples: McDonalds, Girl Scouts) Automate. Tell them they're contractors now, but that they'll make serious cash recruiting others. (examples: Avon, Tupperware, Uber) Outsource the work, or part of the work, to your own customers (examples: Ikea, Waze, Hot Pot City, StackOverflow)


10

This is clearly an issue with the wages. Minimum wages means CEO is trying to get away with as little wages s/he can give. This is not your problem to handle. Report the feedback from employees to the CEO, without throwing any of them under the bus. Its the CEO's decision to make. It's affecting morale and soon people will start to leave and you will be ...


0

Several months into the employment I'm now being told, of the 80 hours I was promised, I have only accrued ~28. Well you had several months to read and understand the Employee Handbook containing the accrual policy. So it really shouldn't be a surprise now. I understand that accrual of PTO is a common practice, but having received a formal offer of ...


6

Analyse your situation to the best ofyour capability! Under what conditions would you be willing to stay? What has to change? What's your way forward after the temp position? Would you have to go back? Could you go into another position? That is, get yourself clear on your constraints. Then, analyse your manager and your company: - Does your manager gain ...


-2

Check yourself. You may be getting a better deal than you thought you were. You thought you were negotiating for a one-time sum of 80 hours of leave. The company appears to be granting you 80 hours of leave per year. If you wind up working there for more than a year, is this not better? Best not to make too big a deal of it, lest they decide to give you ...


1

I've known a lot of people who have negotiated some PTO from the outset* when switching to companies that do PTO accrual instead of a flat number of eligible days per year. I have never known someone who was then told that they had to accrue the promised days, because it defeats the purpose of the negotiation. The only way what they're saying makes sense is ...


0

It sounds like a very normal business practice. Vacation is usually quoted in terms of days per year. Vacation usually accrues over time, generally with each paycheck. It would be very unusual to have an 80 hour vacation balance on day 1 with no restrictions on how you use it. The wording in the offer letter doesn't seem to make any such promise and ...


7

You've tagged your location as United States. PTO accrual is typical in the US. PTO is typically quoted annually (X hours or X days per year), but you start with a zero or a near-zero amount, and it is "earned" either every paycheck or every month (or some other schedule of a similar scale). In effect, your X days of PTO is never available all at once; you ...


10

Legalities aside, as I don't think you want to go that route to solve this anyway. I understand that you are surprised by the fact that PTO accrues, they probably are as surprised by your surprise, as this is fairly normal thing in tech in many modern countries (US, UK, and Australia from my own experience). But is that actually a problem for you? What I ...


1

After your edit the answer is clear: In your particular case, you could reject the change to your contract. And many of your colleagues did. Or you could give in, accept the change, get actually much worse conditions than were announced, and kick yourself for not speaking up. Which the rest of your colleagues did. Lesson to be learned: Stand up for ...


5

I've managed teams for many years and I've observed several major confrontations, arguments etc and whilst I'll concede that letting some conflict pass can be a release, to me physical violence crosses a clear line. H1B visa implies you're a foreign worker in the USA (feel free to correct me if wrong) and I know employment laws and norms differ from ...


9

Go to HR. Tell them you feel unsafe, and why. HR is not your friend; HR’s job is to protect the company from liability, and the company would likely be liable for any injuries gained from violent actions taken in the workplace by employees. Naturally, HR would want to minimise the number of workers’ compensation claims, and that would mean that they would ...


-2

It's not that I want to get these two coworkers fired. Then mind your own business and trust that the hierarchy has things under control. All your information after the event is third hand. They may have been told not to talk about it, you have no way of knowing. Or you may be able to push hard enough to get people sacked and your manager in trouble. Then ...


0

The company should replace the CEO. That can simply mean to hire a new CEO to replace him, if he is an employee CEO. Except he is an owner CEO, as common in small companies. It is often the case that the owner or founder of the company "naturally" became CEO when the company was founded. That makes it more complicated, but not fundamentally different. ...


9

I am also considering leaving the company because of this reason Excellent answers already, I upvoted all three. But I don't use any of these strategies, I let others pop their heads up for the group efforts and will watch in interest if they get their heads chopped off or quite happily take any benefits gratefully. There is another angle. Unfairness to ...


4

I'd like to complain to the management about this unfairness without naming people, because unfairness breeds resentment. Is that advisable ? It sounds like you already did complain ("I mentioned the above arguments also, but my request was still rejected.") but it didn't get you anywhere. Repeated complaints aren't advisable. What is the best way ...


3

Unless remote working provisions are built into your employment contract I would be inclined to tread carefully. I've dealt with several companies whose workforce are predominantly remote workers however they've tended to be in the consulting space where collaboration between employees (on internal company objectives) seemed rare. Most employees were "...


6

They are most likely trying to get more people to the office by following a policy of "let's not drive away old timers by taking away their remote time but let's also not allow people who normally work at the office to start going remote" It's not about fairness, it's about strategic goals. Upper management could be more aggressive and risk senior people ...


1

'you appear to have bad soft skills' is the key message here. Be brutally honest with yourself, identify what soft skills you might be lacking (for example communicating tactfully with peers or colleagues, or language skills), and identify how you can improve these skills. Use this as a chance for self-improvement. Once you've done this, be honest with any ...


0

You will just have to wait. Obviously it sounds like the company is readying accounts so you can start on time, but until they get the OK, you aren't officially hired. You might have to ask someone in HR specifically (unless this was an internal recruiter) about your status. If you still haven't heard in a couple of weeks, you'll definitely need to ask ...


3

Should I follow up with the recruiter about this? Yes. But it sounds like you already did ("I probed the recruiter about relocation details and they responded they are still waiting on background check results"). You might wish to ask the recruiter when you should expect the background check to be completed. Should I disclose anything at this point? No....


6

Given that you have answered all the questions truthfully, and did not intentionally hide / withheld information, you don't need to be worried. If you were not asked / expected to reveal any particular information, you don't need to provide it. Just give it a couple more days. Check back same time next week, if you don't get to hear in the meantime.


3

There is no need to confront your boss. Assuming that your contract says that there must be a notice period of 2 weeks on either side, email him the following: "I just spoke with HR. They said that leaving in two weeks wasn't a problem payroll-wise. So I told them not to change my departure date. So just let me know if you still want me to leave in 13 ...


8

Should I confront him about this? In comments on another question, you indicated that you are in the United States in Texas. Texas is an at-will employment state. I'm assuming that is still the relevant locale. If you are in the US, in an at-will state, it may not be nice, and it may make you furious, but you can be let go without any notice period at all, ...


29

Getting "furious" over this seems a bit of an overreaction - especially as there's a good chance your boss has simply misunderstood HR policy rather than being malicious. That said - it is also not uncommon for employees/employers to come to an agreement that the employee leaves earlier than their notice period when they are resigning, for various reasons - ...


14

How badly do you need an extra day of pay? If the situation is not "I won't be able to pay my rent and/or feed my children without it" then I don't think there's anything worth being furious about here. You wanted to leave anyway, so just shrug about your former manager's strange behavior and enjoy your day off.


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