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Before I respond, I want to say I understand you to a certain extent, Tess. Are there instances of racism and sexism in some workplaces that impedes minorities and women? Yes there is, and such specific instances are indeed problematic. Assuming Brick indeed made a sexist remark demeaning women (or men), based on stereotypes of their gender, is that conduct ...


6

Language creates reality. Everything is about word combinations.† Contact a solicitor and explain your story. Which is: At work, Brick has a history of chauvanist, mysoginist behavior. In a meeting, Brick made a sexist joke. I foolishly responded mentioning "white male privilege". HR has immediately (ONE) suspended me, (TWO) blocked my ...


10

How can I get HR to listen to me and get a handle on this when everyone is refusing to accept my calls and e-mails? So I'll answer your actual question here: You can't as you have been effectively fired already. In many countries companies cannot fire people on the spot unless for specific reasons and must go through a process of investigation before they ...


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Contact your union If you are a member of a labour union, contact the relevant representative for advice: Your union knows your workplace. They may be familiar with your manager and they are certainly familiar with HR at your workplace. They may be aware of facts about Brick that you aren't (and that they almost certainly can't share with you) but that ...


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While most answers here are confrontational (getting a lawyer) this might not help you keep your job. Here is a different suggestion (taking the same stand as the answer from old_lamplighter but a different course of action): Think about your behaviour and attitudes, understand that you were racist and sexist. Try to overcome beeing racist and sexist (while ...


31

Do nothing. Answer any questions during HR investigation truthfully and without emotion. If the company let's you stay, stay. If they want you out, leave. Lawyer up only if Brick threatens legal action after you've taken your leave. In the future, if you need to remember one thing, remember this: in the private world, you may not like Brick, because, as per ...


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There is already a great answer on this, but I just want to add my perspective, in the hope that it may help you in future situations. Your question is very aggressive sounding. Even your question Title is attacking "white men". It's sexist and racist. Why does race and gender matter here? From the way you write, it sounds like you are attacking ...


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I'd say two things: One, it is absolutely essential that you talk to a good employment lawyer. One well-written letter and demonstrating that you don't just roll over may result in thousands in your pocket. Two, don't accuse people of "white privilege". Even womanizers. As you found out, many people will get very annoyed with you, and it may have ...


226

Let me preface this by saying that I am in several "protected groups" and have dealt with workplace discrimination based on that. Including having been told that "They shouldn't be allowed to hire people like you" So, understand that I am not unsympathetic. I then mentioned "wow, can't be that hard being a privileged white male, ...


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Get a lawyer. We lack the details of what Brick did, but I suspect that there are ways it could be construed as abuse of you (and potentially other women). Sexist jokes and unhinged rage can certainly fall into that category, especially if he is your superior in any way. What you want to do is reach out to an employment lawyer, firstly to see if you have a ...


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If I were you, I would contact an employment lawyer specializing in discrimination cases and ask them to write an evidence "preservation letter" to the legal counsel of your company. For a sample letter, see page 74 on this PDF document. (That sample letter is Ontario-specific, but an employment lawyer in your jurisdiction should know how to tailor ...


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I don't see anything you can do right now except await developments and try not to let it worry you too much. You'll get your chance to be heard at some point. Prepare yourself to answer any questions without hesitation. Write a timeline of the event so you have it all clear in your mind.


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As all other answers have explained, the whole thing was a terrible idea, and HR is actually doing their role. I'll answer an unspoken question What to do now? At least it's brought things to a head. No point being scared of bullies now, brazen it out and let the dice fall where they may. May have some therapeutic value if nothing else. You've been forced ...


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Your company is not at fault here. They are actually responding in a reasonable manner. However, you have been given bad advice by your counselor, which caused you to trigger your company's response. If this is not what you wanted, then you shouldn't have done what you did. she had forwarded it to our head office HR department; my question is do these ...


10

Once again....... HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND First off, putting "Personal and confidential" alone on a letter does not make it so. What you did by involving HR was..... involving HR. You presented them with a case and they are now investigating. HR is not the police. HR is not your Rabbi/Imam/Priest. HR is not your psychiatrist or psychologist, and ...


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I only saw one question in the whole post Should I wait or start looking for other opportunities. The answer to that one is simple and universal: You should keep looking for other opportunities until you have a written offer in hand that's fully negotiated and that you are ready to sign.


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I stated I was venting (as advised by my counsellor) If your counsellor actually advised you to vent to HR you should fire them on the spot. This serisouly bad advice. It can't possibly help and its potentially dangerous to your career. However this HR manager instructed me that I attend a meeting to discuss What did you expect would happen? You bring a ...


13

Whoops! HR is not your priest or your lawyer. The things you tell them aren't confidential. There's no "HR oath". They do handle your personal data and so they do have to keep some secrets, but that doesn't apply to your complaints. They're doing pretty much what I'd expect, trying to solve the problem you gave them. As people often point out, ...


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If you want to get a new job, then you don't stop looking until the offer letter is signed and returned and all preconditions have been met. Some people continue looking until the day before they start just in case they lose the contract, the boss quits, or the economy craters. It doesn't matter how positive they seem, or how excited they are, or how much ...


4

First off Should I wait or start looking for other opportunities You should never have stopped. A job search doesn't end until both parties (you and the company) signed a legally binding contract. It is in your interest to pursue multiple job opportunities, so that you maximize your chances of getting a job. All these steps took 3 days after the Nov 2nd ...


2

You ask if you should keep searching. As a general rule, until you have an official offer with your and their autograph under it, yes, you should keep searching. Even if they get back to you tomorrow, their offer might simply not be good enough. Or it might be good enough, but only because you didn't get an even better offer due to not searching further.


3

Transitioning from academia to industry isn't easy but can certainly be done. Your main pronblem is that you are competing with people that only have a Master's degree but already have 3-5 years of industry experience Network, network, network. You probably have attended conference, wrote and reviewed papers, particiapted in forums and discussion boards, ...


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The overly-generic answer is: most companies use HR as a first line of filtering to remove two sorts of resumes: Resumes from people clearly not qualified for the job; no sense in scheduling an interview with Bob-the-Dude-Who-Just-Learned-VBScript-Yesterday for a Mid-Level .NET position. Resumes from people the company really doesn't want to be hiring ...


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It really depends. Normally HR tries to understand what the position is about generally, but of course they aren't in a position to assess technical competences apart from maybe very general things ("Have you worked with Azure?"). They also tend to focus on the "cultural fit" and similar too much vs technical skills. (Both are important, ...


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Depends, as commented. I've seen the whole range from a multi-disciplinanary team commenting on the resume, weightings responses, adjusting for biases, removing outliers and making a recommendation to go forward or not To Bob looking at resume and saying: yeah it lists Excel, let's call this candidate.


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In your case the German laws are leading, because you're living in Germany permanently. Therefore Germany working time rules apply, no matter where the employers are located. Your main question seems to be about the working hours. As you noted there is a limit of 48 hours per week. Your contracts must be very clear that there is not intention to work more ...


3

Can I work as two jobs(full-time and freelancer) in Germany and UK? Yes. The only thing stopping you are any contractual clauses, which I'm assuming don't apply, as you have your employer's permission. (Permission to pursue a PhD might not be the same as "yes you can get additional job" - check your contract). How does employer check the exact ...


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