New answers tagged

1

Is there value in recruitment messages? Short answer: actually, no. Long answer: (see below). I'm assuming it is a weak fact to vouch for a raise or promotion Your assumption is very good. Even worse, the company might become "sad" that you are not loyal enough, and not treat you adequately as a result. can sharing an information like "I'm actively ...


2

Is it OK to call HR for additional details on a job posting? In short "Yes" it is OK to call. Is the job open to non-EU citizens? This is definitely within the wheelhouse of HR. They should be able to answer this question. That is what they are there for. How important is mastery of Dutch language for that particular position? This one should also ...


28

Yes, this is very OK. If you have any questions about the post, it is better to ask for more information than submit an application and it ended up being a waste of yours and the recruiter's time. As an expat working in the Netherlands, I'd just add a point of caution: make sure that the information you're asking for clarification is indeed not written in ...


8

Rule of thumb: When in doubt, always ask. The company (if a sensible one) will appreciate your efforts for calling them to confirm the eligibility, which saves a lot of time and effort for both the sides. If I get a negative response / vibe for calling a prospective employer up for legitimate reasons, I'll think twice to even make an application.


21

If an employer provides contact information, it's done with the expectation that you may want to contact them. And, given the example questions you've posted, it seems like you have a legitimate need to contact them - these are typical questions that a candidate may want to clear with HR prior to applying for a job, and if the answers aren't specified in the ...


2

Is it OK to call company for more details about a job post (not an application)? Yes this is always OK. If the job posting is unclear, it is better for everyone to clarify things before going into the interview process. This avoids wasting anyone's time. Don't consider your calls "cold calls", the company posted a position and you are merely inquiring ...


0

You will have to gather all the information you have regarding time cards, employee handbooks, and any correspondence between you and the company. The timeline will be vary important. Many companies say that a part-time employee can occasionally work 40 hours in some weeks if the is a temporary need. They may specify a threshold of hours in a year, or ...


0

I was screwed over intentionally by not classifying me correctly. It is a very dangerous sentence, because you cannot prove it, and it actually might be false altogether. What you may be able to claim is: I was classified incorrectly, possibly by mistake. But I am now intentionally screwed, because the company does not want to repair the damage, to the ...


5

See a labor law attorney, and check the laws of your state. You may or may not be entitled to back pay or benefits, but it varies wildly from state to state.


8

Sorry, but I'm going to post a mean answer: they're likely slamming on the brakes due to your communication and attitude - and my guess is that they were hoping you wouldn't accept the offer. I mean, first up, try reading your question aloud exactly as you've written it. It doesn't communicate clearly, it wasn't proofread at all, and it basically screams a ...


5

There is no way for us to know what they are thinking. In my opinion, you have shot yourself in the foot. You had a back and forth over salary, which you said neither party was happy. However, they still extended an offer to you. To which, you essentially denied the offer by your response. If I were the company, I would not hire you, as you are ...


6

You absolutely should tell the HR representative at your new company the situation. If they believe you are still working, they might not be in a particular rush to get things finalized for your work permit. Hopefully, they can expedite the process. Never lie to a potential employer. Although it probably wouldnt hurt you if they found out, at the very ...


6

"I am a fresh graduate so it’s literally my first job which is why I have no clue what to do, and no there was no there was no offer letter because I didn’t need it at the time." Contact your new manager and ask for advice. If you are lucky this is a lapse in communication within the company and can be put right via some polite conversations with the right ...


1

I have known of only one situation were somebody had to quit the company for what many would view as a internal transfer. In that case there was a publicly known parent company but the two jobs were in two different subsidiaries. The issue was that the benefit packages for those two companies were vastly different: one still had a pension, the other didn't;...


3

In some countries, it's not very uncommon. For example, in Germany, you are asked to resign before you get to sign your new contract. I had this two times already, one time for a change of working hours and the other time for a promotion. In both cases, I added a restriction to my resignation letter to just resigned for a new contract to take effect. It was ...


4

How can we approach human resources to stop this bullying behavior, or get him to automate stuff that isn't our work exclusively? You don't. This employee is not exhibiting any bullying behavior, he is simply doing his job and doing it well enough to have some others worried apparently. If you approach HR with this "problem" you will only hurt your ...


25

Based on the details in the linked question, your division lead, "Chan", acted against his employer's interests in order to ensure his team continues to be paid for work that (based on the information available) is easily automated (how can a team of 200 developers be replaced with a script? Is the company that inefficient?). Also, your division lead sounds ...


7

You can't stop Automation. When automation occurs in general, its aimed at increasing productivity by removing easy and repetitive tasks and allowing an employee to focus on more important work. If its the case that these automation procedures are being targeted at making people redundant, I would go back and look at any team which are under performing or ...


2

This is very unusual in my experience. I'm in the US, but not in Texas, and I've never heard of a situation where a company asks you to resign to take another position in the same company. I've certainly never heard of requiring someone to resign just to pursue such another position within the company. Having done it myself, I'll say that the normal ...


2

It's unusual. Once you have a signed contract, you can resign. But not before. But even then there is downside. An internal transfer is better. Do they do this for external people that they hire? Demand that they resign from their other job before they are able to sign the contract?


1

You are making a mistake by trying to pin the future of your idea on one person/department. Instead of saying: "HR should do this" You should be saying: "Here is a great idea, how can we make this work?" Ideally you want to be saying this to the person who is most likely to make the idea happen. You need to find someone that a) has the power to make ...


7

I've been having a increasing feeling that the HR representative fails in recognizing the efforts of these people [...] I want HR to reflect that it's doing a bad job at promoting events itself... This seems a bit bizarre to me - that's not really HR's job at all. If you want to organise events then that's great, but as you say, then the promotion, ...


2

You are doing things out of order. You need to apply for the job, and secure the job first. Once you have secured the job, then you should resign from your current position, so you can work the new position within the company. Do not ever resign from a job without having one secured already, ever. I have done this once in the past where I landed a job ...


12

It's not normal, length of service is important for lots of things. Social Security and many other statutory benefits depend on length of service in many cases It may or may not be Illegal that does depend on country, it's not a sign of a good employer in any case.


15

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In the past, I've forwarded the resume to HR as a candidate without referral. I usually include verbiage something like this: "I'm ...


7

In this context, what is the right way to share the profile with HR but at the same time making it clear that this is not a referral? Is it appropriate to mention that straight away or to hint towards it somehow? In this context (you don't want to refer her) I would not forward her profile to HR at all. Doing that is in fact a form of referral and if you ...


1

Short version: call them now and ask. Long version: There’s no reason to avoid or delay asking about the terms of a possible contract, other than the fact that the exact terms may undecided. Most commonly, the rate of compensation and amount of leave may depend upon negotiation after they have determined how you will fit into their organization. The ...


3

That would be the last possible time and I think you should ask much earlier if a short period would be a deal breaker for you. Otherwise the whole interview process is a waste of time. This is a rather basic information so I think you should just call or mail HR and ask about it.


1

You are concerned that it may be or seem unnecessary to hire a new team member as long as your current output is fine. Let me clarify what this implies: Additional personal only gets hired AFTER problems have arisen. Meaning in some way there has already been damage to your team, some budget, some relation to a customer, product quality etc. THEN you START ...


6

"I feel like it's going to rain today." doesn't mean it's going to rain today. Everything you've stated is conjecture on your part. My advice would be to lobby for the raise you think you deserve for this new position and if you don't get what you ask for then consider either stepping down from this position or find a job elsewhere. There really are no ...


3

one of you two should become a parent and leave for a year. you will get a replacement worker and if he does well he can probably stay when the parent comes back. also: bus factor btw, if you do scrum on a two person team, you are not doing scrum! :-D show them the scrum guide where it says that a team size below three is not recommendend. some answers ...


6

You need to determine your actual capacity, make a list of all the tasks with their sizes, show the decision makers that list with a line drawn between what will fit and what won't, and ask them to decide where to cut. It's their job to decide whether it's more important to save money on staffing or to finish more projects. It's your job to make sure they ...


14

Contact the right people HR, and there somebody that is truly engaged in wellbeing and has the power drive the change A senior manager that has enough experience and authority The source of the tasks Do not undervalue soft power. A manager that is not necessarily that senior in the hierarchy can have seniority from the years of working valued, sometimes ...


6

Small teams are harder to justify a new team member because the increase in team size is greater. In your case, you are asking for a 50% increase in team size, relative to that other team which only received a 25% increase in size. Unfortunately, unless you are consistently working more than 10-20% overtime each, that 50% bump is just going to be hard. What ...


38

A nearby team (of 4 members), whose output is poor, got an additional member. This is a potential red flag for me. Of course, some of the times, the output deficiency is due to not having enough staff, in which case it makes sense to add headcount and continue monitoring output. But if there's a more general pattern of rewarding poor-performing teams with ...


165

Question: How to properly justify a team increase given that we don't have an output issue? (we are delivering in an acceptable manner already) Stop working overtime and see if your team can still deliver in an acceptable manner. By working overtime, you are simply adding hours of work to each member of the team, which is not much different than those ...


16

why can't they provide me with a position in [team A]? Maybe they don't have any (relevant) open positions right now. just let me skip the 2 interviews for the position at division B Consider this from the other side - would you ever want somebody coming into your team who you hadn't interviewed? If somebody tried to do that to my team, my boss would ...


1

I don't know where you are in the world, but i have seen sick days taken used in redundancy matrices. So even if it is not immediately apparent it could have detrimental long term effects. What happens if you do catch an illness that requires lots of sick days, you will now be over and HR will be on your back, with a possible warning.


1

Human resources doesn’t care about individual, isolated incidents. First and foremost, I am honestly not too sure what you mean when you say this: I work in the I.T. department as I had an issue with cheap toilet roll and unable to sit because of pain so I decided to put in a request. But in general — and unless the incident is incredibly crazy or ...


60

I think you are misreading the social cues here. From the now-deleted screenshot of the chat, the sequence of postings is: You make a posting asking for better quality toilet paper. Someone (M) makes a straightforward reply that you need to go to facilities, who handle this. You then post asking if a bidet spray is an option. Another person (A) posts that ...


9

Is the total extent of AR's mockery this one post? If so, I really think you need to calm down. What do you expect HR to do? Do you think they're going to fire him because he made one snide remark about toilet paper? Or even give him some sort of formal reprimand? In a normal, healthy workplace, people joke around with each other all the time. Trying to ...


27

I seriously doubt that AR is going to mock you for asking about better toilet paper. What he will mock you for is acting as if a juvenile joke about toilet paper is a personal attack against you. If you take this mishmash to HR they are most likely to tell you that just because you have a sensitive asshole it is no reason for you to be a sensitive asshole. ...


84

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


4

how do I react to it Ultimately, that's a question that needs a personal answer based on your own goals and your feelings. No one likes to be mocked, especially when making a helpful suggestion about a sensitive topic. But it's important to also keep in mind that those who mock are often just looking for attention - they want to get a rise out of you, and ...


12

Your boss is messing with your professional reputation I don't know if that is their intention, but it is certainly the end result. Taking sick leave straight after a planned holiday generally carries a negative connotation - it is not a good look. Your boss might think they're doing you a favour, but it could give other people in the company the impression ...


6

If this person were a "bad" employee and was terminated as a result then you could simply deny their request. BUT It sounds like they were let go because they were too inexperienced for the role. That's not a fault. It's not a deficiency. None of us are born with any skills or experience. We were all in this persons shoes at one point or another. So... ...


0

I don't recall ever seeing a Linkedin recommendation that put negatives or qualifications on the endorsement like, 'only good if you train him' or 'might work out if you have good onboarding tools'. Probably because that kind of thing will actually reflect poorly on your company's hiring process if not training. Anyhow, if it's not a thing, you probably ...


4

I am, however, reluctant to put anything in writing, especially on a social platform. Can anyone familiar with regulations around this sort of thing educate me as to whether I am right to be cautious? There are no relevant regulations. There may be a corporate policy - check with HR. That said, if you are uncomfortable putting things in writing, then ...


19

Just because this has not been mentioned yet, Assuming your company is larger, I have seen organisations where the budget for paid vacation comes directly from your team / manager's budget, but sickness comes from a central company medical expense budget. It could be that your manager is trying to manipulate such a system to have a little more money for the ...


2

Unless this new business is a direct competitor of your current business, I see no reason to be exceptionally secretive with the CEO. Twenty years is the better part of an entire career, and being a CTO is so far up the ladder that you may not ever have an opportunity like what you're getting. Be honest. Twenty years also sounds a lot like "I've grown a lot,...


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