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0

I can’t help but think that an OT assessment is designed to force me into something. In the UK, your employer is permitted to ignore the medical opinions of your doctor. They could very well use the opinions of other medical practitioners in order to prove your fitness for work. In addition, your refusal to work with your employer in order to facilitate a ...


6

I can think of two good reasons why your employer may want you to talk to their occupational therapist. To determine what you will and won't be able to do when you return to work. To determine whether or not they need to make any adjustments to your workplace while you recover from your injury.


0

To make it a little more complicated, the person the hiring manager gave advice to is an internal candidate, while everyone else are outside candidates. In my experience this is an unusual situation. Where I have worked at the start of the hiring process a decision is made: internal first, then external; or external. If a position is open to external ...


8

HR is not aware of this, and I’m tempted to tell them. Don't. It's not your problem, you will damage relationships, you might make a fool out of yourself and it's not going to make anything "better" for anyone. I think you have a significant misconception about the interviewing process. It's NOT like a college test: questions with right/wrong ...


12

Ethics varies with the context, and often has a personal and cultural baggage. So what is ethical to you may be unethical for someone else under different circumstances. Let's take the example you have given and consider it from the perspective of a corporate environment. Suppose I wanted to promote someone from my team. But my boss doesn't like them for ...


1

Knowledge of the Job itself may be Confidential Information This kind of secrecy is not uncommon in very large corporations and or in situations were chains of non-disclosure are too complex for the interviewer to know exactly what he can and can not tell you. One example where I've seen something like this was an interview I had with Microsoft several years ...


0

It’s just a minor addition to the existing answers, but since my comment was deleted, here in answer form: I agree that it is uncommon, generally a red flag and a bad way for finding skilled and critical candidates, but there might be some reasons to it: very high prestige employer or entry-level position with a standardized first round interview company ...


0

Increasingly common There are a lot of factors that are leading to this style of interviewing in recent years based on my experience. companies follow a script interviews are seen increasingly as tests data is collected requiring a standard process general immaturity about hiring quality people interviews are seen as data collection exercises fear about ...


0

A slightly different context where this might happen is a short first interview for a technical job with many applicants who don't meet the criteria. A half hour phone interview checks whether it's worth both the parties investing more time. This is especially the case if the number of skilled candidates is less than the number who just put relevant keywords ...


5

Quite common if they are hiring in bulk Unfortunately, this is a common situation with some companies, not only in Germany but elsewhere. To put it simple, company is usually well known, and reputable in its field. Think Mercedes-Benz or Bosch. They do not have to be that big, but is expected from candidates to already know about them (unless they were ...


2

Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? I have no idea if this was the rationale for your interview, but one of my associates just went through a US military contractor interview that had a couple of similarities. In this interview there were no questions at all (it was to be a live prepared presentation ...


3

You also interview the company. Company also asks questions that you answer all the time. That is not a reason for you to tell a company: During the interview I will not be taking questions. I will provide a list of all the questions you might ask as a company after the interview Why would you do such thing? Or a company? They think their time is more ...


19

TL;DR: It might be an Assessment-Center In some large German companies, there is the process of an "Assessment-Center" (yes, the english term is used in german). I was lucky enough to avoid them in my career, and they are frowned upon by many. These are no regular interviews, but maybe this wasn't clearly presented to you. It might be that the HR ...


-1

It's probably not useful to speculate on exactly how common it is -- among other things, it depends highly on the country, field, company, position... But it's certainly not the most common way to do interviews, and with good reason: The best candidates usually have important questions themselves. For example, maybe they are trying to choose from multiple ...


-3

I would not worry about this at all. My explanation would be that the interviewer simply is not very experienced or enlightened about this kind of discussion. When I was just a little teamlead, I got no guidance from my company whatsoever on how to do these things, and I might have lead one or two interviews like this as well. The important thing for you is ...


-1

My impression is it will not be necessary for you to ask any questions for you to be able to answer our questions. It other words, all questions are self contained; they have sufficient information in them to be answered without clarification. Maybe they are busy and want to make the interview process faster, so they can fire lots of questions at you without ...


0

It's probably not really a red flag or unusual (for some companies). The company has just taken the interview process to the nth-degree. More than likely the interviewers do not have the technical background or knowledge of the specifics of said job (and so don't want to be caught out). And given their limited time with each candidate, they simply keep to a ...


-1

It depends on the employer they can ignore the lies. But the the BGV is done for last 10 years in banking.


5

I hope that this type of job interview is not common. In my field we have a shortage of skilled candidates in Germany. From the employer's perspective it's not only important to get to know the candidate, but it's also important to make a good impression on the candidate. As team leader I'm interviewing candidates at least twice a month. We usually structure ...


2

Like the others, I also think it's quite weird and I never encountered this behaviour during an interview myself. However here are the reasons I can think of why a company would behave like this. They have dozens/hundreds interviews more to do and are on a really tight schedule. They indeed think that a job interview is a oneway street where they get to ...


17

That is super unusual. It might be acceptable when the job in question is highly standardized, maybe unionized, maybe limited in time. For example, cleaning tables at a big fast food chain over the summer. They have this opening, it's not very flexible, they have lots of candidates and they are only looking for one or two to accept it as is with no hassle. ...


35

I'm not defending the company here, and honestly, this sounds like terrible interview practice. But, one possible explanation could be that this was a pool interview. In other words, there are X possible roles available within the company (possibly for different departments), and they are using the interview to figure out which, if any, you would be a good ...


46

I would say this kind of interview is very uncommon, and with good reason. Usually a job interview is so that both parties get a feel for one another. If it ends up more like a interrogation, then the interviewer won't know everything they should about the candidate. Of course, the candidate doesn't know whether or not they should take the job. You know more ...


180

How common is this type of job interview? Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? That's pretty unusual and would be a red flag for me. Interviewing is a two way street. In order for a hire to be successful, the candidate must be a good fit for the role, but the role and the culture must also be a good fit ...


0

Not sure regarding your industry and job, would help to better pinpoint the answer, and it seems you are a colleague, not a supervisor, but If it is not on a time-sheet, the only time it can be concerning if he get injured during this time and submit worker compensation claim. As i see it , it may be an issue of commute. I myself had jobs where there was ...


0

Have you spoken to your colleague? I suggest asking him why he prefers to start early. (Although another answer indicates that this is offensive, it would be normal lunchtime conversation in my geography.) Two of my team members, my partner and her dad all share this same proclivity: They do not leave any earlier than their colleagues, but they arrive much ...


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