New answers tagged

3

is it foolish to turn down the offer from this mid sized company for a contingent offer? No. It's a perfectly rational decision. is it risky to wait a month or two for an official offer after a contingent offer Only a little. It seems that the large company is on the ball and communicating well, so the likelihood of them going back is small. Nothing is ...


0

I do agree that technically you're not doing anything wrong by applying to multiple positions. However what I get from your question is that you're worried you fail one job interview, and that same recruiter inform the others that you failed and they decide not to pursue it any further. No way for us to know for sure but it is possible that if the interview ...


0

It's not what they said, it's how they said it: I don't understand why you can only start working in May? The above statement is confrontational an borderline demeaning. My knee-jerk reaction would be "I think your lack of understanding stems from your lack of reading my resume" but that's obviously not constructive... To me it signals that the ...


1

Besides the other answers, there is also the negotiation/haggling part. In the EU (broadly speaking) you have 3 months of notice. Many companies will still ask you whether you could try to negotiate a shorter notice. This is possible and ultimately depends on how much you are needed during the notice period (to pass on the lknowledge or do minimal work), ...


2

I'm assuming from the tone of your question that you feel able to talk about your scarring and that your tattooed co-worker approached the subject in a manner with which you were comfortable. In which case... I told the coworker that I wasn't being harassed and it wasn't her business and she said that I shouldn't let people walk all over me Oh the irony... ...


1

The recruiters are not likely to speak to each other, but of course it can happen. It is not a bad thing to do, but make sure to mention it when they ask if you have other ongoing applications. Being secretive about this will turn out bad, and there is no reason to. Just make sure you are honest/consistent in what you tell them during the different ...


3

Unless you know for sure that these jobs are for same positions from the same (geographically distributed) team - it's ok to apply for multiple positions. Based on your preference and their acceptance, you can choose any one, if you land on multiple offers. Usually the pay-scale can vary based on location - so I do not see any downside for these applications....


0

My own take elaborating on Joe Strazzere and O. Jones' answers. This requires a conversation where you get answers as to the company's funding, runway and progress towards the market and sales revenue. Key factors for startups are runway (how many months they've got funding for) and sales (which helps towards profitability, and/or enables further funding ...


-2

In my industry it's nothing special to get a 100+ applicants over the course of a weekend. These will be screened and the good ones will be forwarded to HR/Recruiting to set up an interview. So HR is only responsible for setting meetings up and the mony side and the departments choose the people they want. You can't expect HR to be a specialist in all jobs ...


6

I have taught both resume writing and job hunting strategies, here's the traditional wisdom: Don't chase trends. Eventually, they fall out of favor and count against you. Be prepared to tweak your resume to fit the job for which you are applying. While "trendy" resumes will get attention, they are just as likely to get bad, as good attention. A ...


2

It might matter depending on what jobs you are applying to. If you're applying for something that involves artistic work, such as some sort of graphics designer role, than having something visually distinct could help demonstrate your skills and this could help. Having a resume that stands out might be good, but you also want it to be easy to read. And it's ...


-2

A resume is not a contract A contract of employment requires a clear offer and a clear acceptance affirmed by both parties in writing.* If a clear starting date is not agreed, they can't hold you to it and you can't hold them to it. It is to your benefit to get everything in writing, including remuneration and the nature of your duties. Also you should ask ...


11

Anecdotally, I have had two jobs where I provided a very clear start date and subsequently had HR ask if I could start earlier. On one occasion my new boss would be on vacation for my first 2 weeks and I was asked if I was available to start 3 days early so he could get on-boarding kicked-off and bring me up to speed before he left. On the other occasion ...


12

HR Doesn't know the specifics of your own situation. While they may be interested in you as a candidate from the details of your resume and your interview, it's possible that you have forgotten that your preferred start date is on your resume - after all, I assume this isn't the only job you've applied to, and you may forget that you've listed a start date ...


30

Why would they ask? If you stated you can work May to August, and they need someone to start mid April, it is obvious that they would ask you if you could possibly start two weeks earlier. It is the old principle "if you don't ask, you won't get". It's fine to say "no". If they have five new employees arriving on 1st of May, they'd ask ...


114

I wouldn't see it as a red flag. They might have missed it in the resume, people don't spend a long time reviewing these and could have looked more into the skills/experience section, depends on how clear it was from a quick skim through. It also could be that one person reviews submissions and shortlists candidates, then a different person is responsible ...


1

Yes, why assume HR read all the document? But seriously, HR do ask as they may need someone to start asap due to a planning change (or error or failure), and if you were just having an extended break they could get you. Since it seems it was clear from your CV when exactly you were available it may mean HR was working from a standard list of questions.


6

First things first: check your employee handbook if this actually was okay. It might have been consensual, but "doing it" in the copier room is consensual too, but still gets both people fired. If it was against any policy, talk to your colleague and maybe get legal advice. Assuming it was okay and no policy was violated, write two emails: Write ...


3

Two points I don't yet see made: The complaining coworker might not trying to protect you particularly (since as far as we can tell from your question, she does not know you well) but might just like causing HR incidents for whatever reason. Just tell the helpful coworker that if anything comes of the situation, you are ready to testify that no offence or ...


0

I think you have already done what you should do to deal with the current situation, except (so I presume) for one thing: start being kind to your coworkers. Your description of the situation involves many little hints which suggest a defective, especially uncooperative work environment in your organization. The issue at hand is a symptomatic example of that....


5

Is it possible that I am in a blacklist? Yes. Many companies track candidates and there is often a check box for "consider for other roles?" which can say either yes or no. Some companies do this, others do not. This would depend a lot on how your last interaction went and if you manage to seriously annoy someone in the process. Personally, I ...


4

It's company specific whether you are or not, but it's certainly a likely scenario if you are qualified and there is no other reason to ignore you. You wasted company time and resources in the past, many companies would note that down.


-8

Since the first coworker is male, you are female and the second coworker is also female, it is extremely likely that your tattooed coworker will be fired immediately upon receiving the report, without the need for your input. If you want to protect your tattooed coworker and yourself then... It is suggested that you report Karen as soon as possible for ...


52

Normally I would agree with the answers already posted and say "don't worry about it everything is fine", except that this person has already threatened to take action. If the other person simply said "don't do that, that's not right to say", then I would say do nothing, however the threat of going to HR makes me think you should do ...


2

People can file HR complaints about anything. The question is will those complaints merit disciplinary action? In this case I suspect not. BUT when HR talks to you about it to get your side of the story I'd tell them something like "I appreciate their concern but I do not agree with their supposition that I was being harassed" i don't want my ...


9

Try not to worry about it too much At the moment, do nothing IF person B goes to HR. All you need to say is this: "Oh, I really appreciate person B trying to help. But honestly there is no problem! Person A was only discussing it with me. Person A was not causing any problem whatsoever! I appreciate B trying to help, but there was absolutely no ...


1

It's hard to read all of it but from what I got is you have a mentor person at the office and this person is making comments about your personal life or appearance. Did you talk to your manager that you do not feel comfortable with the new mentor because of his inappropriate comments? Just say while he doesn't say or do anything specific, give the examples ...


2

You need to change your strategy going into these meetings. I think you did a good job of preparing the person for the response; but, did a poor job of wording it (and a worse job of letting them know why they would receive such feedback). Share more of the situation with them. Clearly tell him you're about to drop a lot of work on a team that's effectively ...


0

Documentation In general developers like developing. They have deadlines - usually unrealistic. Documenting what they have done is very often the last thing on their mind. If the software works leave it alone and move on to the next stage. The problem associated with this is that end users don't understand and future developers don't dare to meddle too much ...


8

I emailed CS rep and said "If accounting director is pissy with you, you didn't do anything wrong". I also followed up with CS rep via phone to explain the current nightmare situation in accounting so he didn't feel like he did something wrong or caused a problem. Well, my "pissy" email got forwarded to accounting director in a ...


3

At this point you have done what you can and it's time to move on. Carefully document the steps that you have taken, review then with HR and have HR either confirm in writing that they are satisfied or give you specific & actionable alternatives. Repeat until HR confirms that you are done. Then continue life as if nothing had happened and assume that the ...


7

Go back to HR and explain that you are not able to contact her - she is not answering her phone when you call, although you did leave a message. Ask them if there is another way to get your apology to her. HR is the ones who wanted you to call, and you've tried that. They need to know that you've tried and what the result was. At this point, just be ...


2

Context: French, in a large company, many times in charge of either interns or apprentices. When choosing them, I always told them that I am not a good manager and that I expect them to be very independent. They will have a more or less defined subject and that they will be on their own. They will be free to come anytime to discuss, challenge, get advice. We ...


4

Sorry you're having difficulty. I don't know how things are in France, but I did a similar program in the US and learned a great deal, some of which had nothing to do with my field of study (engineering). In fact, the most useful things I learned were about dealing with different managers and co-workers, so you have an opportunity to learn here. Here's a ...


8

You have two separable objectives in this work placement: Gain as much useful knowledge and experience as you can. Meet your university's formal requirements. You should find out from your university one simple thing: what constitutes "official success/credit" for the work/study. If there is someone at the company who will need to certify to the ...


3

You should make sure to check with your friend if they're okay with using their name in your message. If it's okay, briefly mention it at the start of the email like this. Dear [HR Person Name], [Friend] provided me with your contact details, and I'm writing you to inquire about an internship at [Company Name]. ... The usefulness of this differs depending ...


7

You have a subject, that's at least something. What I would suggest is define yourself a goal. Let's say you're studying IA, you could set your sight on a AI tool like Tensor Flow and build something. Even just following a tutorial to learn the tool. Give you a day or two max to find something. Once you have define yourself a short, clear and achievable goal ...


114

The general advice for this kind of situation is to present solutions to your bosses, not problems. "I don't have any work to do" is a problem. You're asking them to spend time and effort to solve this problem by finding work for you to do. (whether they ought to be doing that, given that this is a work study program, is neither here nor there. It ...


40

Talk to your university. I'm not familiar with the particulars of French academia (and academia can vary more than many people think it does), but your university arranged this work/study program as a learning experience for you. If you're not doing anything productive or educational, then you're at risk of failing to meet the requirements that the ...


0

I like the other answers here but I want to add in something. Based on your question, I see that you are merely a team member and this is your co-worker. He is very annoying and you don't like it. You want him fired because you believe he's incompetent and you want to notify the management that you believe he should be fired. You have nothing direct with him ...


2

OK long question which has a lot of context but seems more like a rant. Let me look at what your actual questions are: What can I do? If there are problems with you working with this individual then you can only comment to your manager what the problems are after that it's the managers responsibility. should I raise this with HR? That would be going ...


9

You want to complain about a colleague whose faults are already well known higher up the hierarchy. Don't make a formal complaint. Despite the lengthy question you have nothing new to add to what people in actual positions of authority know and are working on mitigating against already. Your colleague is digging himself a hole, do not try and help him dig, ...


1

"It's not your problem." You were told to get the files. Apparently, in order to "get those files," some third-party had to do it. You did your best. Look: "take it from someone who has been (koff, koff ...) 'on the topmost floor, and then some.'" Until you've actually been "upstairs," you really have no idea. (&...


0

My question is, did I do the right thing by telling her the truth, or is there a bro-code or code of ethics to avoid being in trouble and at the same time not tattle-tale? I don't really understand your question, per say. I understand that you ordered some boxes from the basement and the person you ordered it from, never gave it to you. It could be as ...


5

Stating the facts isn't snitching. What else would you do? Make up a lie? I requested that the maintenance department deliver the boxes to my room. They haven't been delivered yet. I have followed up with them and am waiting to hear back.


18

It's not high school. Just state the facts making no judgements and absolutely no emotional aspect. Something like I requested that the maintenance department deliver the boxes to my room. They haven't been delivered yet. I have followed up with them and am waiting to hear back. In a work environment, never ever "don't tell on" someone, it would ...


0

Philip Kendall 's answer is right, but I want to add more information that won't go in a comment. There are "magic" words you can use to get HRs attention. Try saying you want to report "workplace harassment". These words are magic because HR has a duty to deal with workplace harassment cases and will be in trouble if they don't. Also don'...


-5

Time to find another job!! Whew!


2

As others pointed out here, HR is protecting the company based on policies. If you want them to go into your favor, then you need to show something they have to react on to protect the company from a possible lawsuit or fine. For example, if you have a clear message that they want to fire you because of your gender, then that is something HR will have to ...


10

You may want to look at this Wikipedia page, which seems to describe what you're going through. I am not a lawyer and you may want to talk to one before proceeding, but based on this you seem to have a bunch of the telltale signs of Constructive Dismissal: In order to avoid such a breach "[a]n employer must not, without reasonable or proper cause, ...


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