New answers tagged

1

In most cases it comes down to how much liability a company can have if they have to pay out on that PTO if it builds up to to large of a size and is paid out in one or a few large chunks. For example say someone decides to save 5 days from each years allotment of PTO it would add up to a large chunk quickly. After 10 years they would have 50 days any be ...


1

The advice on low-quality job blogs tends to give baloney examples like “increased customer satisfaction by 11%” as an example of an objective quantifiable result. But is it really? If the interviewer is in anyway critical, they’re going to be asking all kinds of questions including whether or not that figure is even knowable. Just because something is given ...


6

How do companies verify such figures on a resume? For all intents and purposes, they don't. However, tread carefully. If you claim savings that don't appear to make sense, expect probing questions to determine if you can back them up. When people make up numbers and statistics, they tend to make particular mistakes. Sometimes, they round up too much. For ...


1

Two things not yet covered, the intent of the policy, and the cost. First is the reason to offer paid vacation time. It is to allow taking a break without a loss of income. Families especially use this time. The notion of accruing a cushion was never the intent of paying employees for not coming to work, it was to cover the time that they wanted off. So if ...


4

I have talked to the management of the small companies I have worked for regarding either use-it-or-lose-it or paying for excess leave hours. These are not an any particular order. The leave account is a liability. They have to keep money around because the employee can take leave on short notice. Keeping that liability low, and the account balance low ...


7

The most common reason I heard is that Employees become more expensive over time So that vacation after a raise costs your company more money than before a raise. The difference might be small for one person, but if it is common behaviour to collect vacation days over the years then it sums up to a big amount. Also you confirmed the other reason that ...


7

Multiple reasons you listed that makes it easy for this policy to be implemented but limited to no reason for it not to. Really not having cash available. Orgs need to budget for those things and if they do not have a top limit on how much they might need to pay off, they might run into issues. And some risk management philosophies dictate that might is a ...


0

Think about this: Who pays the survey company? You or your employer? That's right, your employer pays them. Then, based on that, for whose benefit do they work? For your benefit or for your employers benefit? Of course, for the benefit of the one who pays them. There are stated principles (anonymity) and then there are actual actions. So, how is the survey ...


7

You seem to be asking two distinct questions: how effective are surveys? and, can my bosses tell who wrote what? Unfortunately, the answers to both depend 100% on the attitudes and motives of the company leadership. I've seen companies where surveys were very effective and anonymous, and others where the survey was used as a witch hunt to find the ...


1

what are the best ways to write these so that the company will not be able to find out the person who wrote this particular feedback. Confidentiality is not the same as Anonymity. The survey feedback may be collected confidentially, but only in some cases, it is partially anonymized for certain responses. In every engagement survey I've participated in, ...


2

I think the main issue for any individual in this situation is about one’s own self -esteem. If one has an adequate level of self-esteem these sort of situations will not be troubling and let alone an issue. Yes, bullying and degrading comments are wrong but it’s the reality out there. And one will face such again and again. Answer lies with our own self -...


12

If they are anonymous, I want to write about office politics, incompetent manager, several malpractices in the office. Also, what are the best ways to write these so that the company will not be able to find out the person who wrote this particular feedback. (Having limited number of employees, someone might be able to trace out the person who ...


38

The company surely wouldn't share your resignation letter with the remaining employees. Writing an open letter to the remaining employees is a sure fire way to burn bridges, create animosity, and potentially damage whatever relationships you have left at this company. It seems to me that your real motivation is to exact some kind of "karmic" revenge on the ...


9

now within 6 months I have the better offer the HR Director said I would never get. Does the new offer aligns with your future career goals and is a professional progression for you? If yes, sure go ahead and take it. You don't need to explicitly state it to the HR director. Or should I just leave without bringing it up. Exactly do this. Considering ...


0

Do you think they will still verify my previous job history going off my resume, by any chance? I ask because I have a couple "contract"/freelance positions on there. One says "TEMP POSITION" but doesn't say who my staffing agency is (not trying to deceive, just a (maybe?) careless omission). The other doesn't mention that I was a 1099 ...


2

You can expect your employer to receive your employment history as part of your background check, but unless you've been dishonest about your past employment, you shouldn't be worried. If there are questions, you can expect to have a chance to explain. Your future employer more likely cares about things like criminal history, credit history, and social ...


3

Yes an email is too far. I'm sure they are used to not getting an answer straight away, that's why we have voicemail. As long as you are polite and apologise over the phone on return call. Remember they are paid to place you, you calling them back is a favour to them.


0

There's no need to apologize. They could easily send you an email suggesting one or two times for a scheduling call or one or two times for the appointment.


13

Would an apology email be too much? That's a difficult question to answer since none of us are this person trying to call you. That said, it's somewhat typical for recruiters to have to play a bit of "phone tag" with candidates, especially since recruiters are typically calling candidates during normal working hours, and many candidates are working current ...


-1

Front Office Personnel at Banking, Finance and Tech firms in the US are generally all subject to MTA and generally all have at least 2 addition weeks paid leave in addition to MTA. So when Banker A takes starting Front Office position at Investment Bank A - they would generally start out with 4 weeks paid annual leave. Two weeks would be MTA that they MUST ...


1

Call your company's HR. Let them know that the necessary equipment has not arrived and ask for the current status of the shipment. While you are at it, you can ask them if you will still be paid ( you can also read your contract and employee handbook ). Assuming this is a legit company and not some scam, they should be able to let you know the status of ...


1

They are many jobs out there that will allow you to work from home . The minimum is 1 day a week . Look for another one mate. This is obviously too much stress in you right now and your health comes first. Take some time off if you need to also. It's you then your company. Remember you work to live not live to work there is a big difference.


4

The work from home agreement was made as a result of a medical condition? By getting rid of it, your employer risks breaching the Equality Act 2010. To quote the [UK Government’s official website] [1]: Reasonable adjustments in the workplace An employer has to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to avoid you being put at a disadvantage compared to non-...


3

As for HR, I feel like they're on "his side" Human Resources exists to protect the company. They are never on your side unless a dispute arises between you and a third party. Even then it's still aimed at saving the company and not individual employees--we're saved as collateral un-damage. Don't get me wrong--there are plenty of wonderful bosses with big ...


3

When management changes, it is not unusual for the new boss to require the physical presence of all team members so they can start figuring out what they have from a resource perspective: talent wise, attitude, productivity, etc. Your first course of action, and most important one, is to work with your doctor and get to the bottom of your medical issues. ...


1

I suggest looking at it from the perspective of what is best for you. If failure by the company to make accommodations for your disability could end up being bad for you, it's probably best to disclose it before accepting the job. Maybe after interviewing and being offered the position, if you don't feel it will have a significant impact on your work when ...


1

They both came back, and have filed for mileage claims. Team B employee's claims have been approved by their team leader, and I have told my subordinate that I will reject her claims on the basis that she didn't drive and did not incur any additional cost. Subordinate queried on the unfairness. Why team B employee claims got approved while hers didn't. To ...


2

An issue not raised so far is tax. We probably live in different countries, but at least where I live the milage allowances are set based on what the company is allowed (by the tax authorities) to pay to drivers without it being taxed as additional income. Would those tax authorities be happy to pay a mileage allowance to someone who didn't drive? I don't ...


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