New answers tagged

4

it would've came across that I was throwing the PM under the bus. I'd have preferred to avoid doing this because I'm not that sort of person, so I sent the aforementioned Director a DM instead. Seems to me that those questions where addressed to the PM, so she was the one that should have answered. You didn't had to "throw her under the bus"; a ...


3

There are a couple problems here: Firstly, your team is not being given the resources it needs. You needed a bunch of data, presumably the PM knew about this, and the PM did not allocate resources to get that data (until you asked for it). Even when the resources were allocated, they were only allocated half-assed; the tool is there but the data is not, ...


0

What the HR person said was wrong. There are three ways, not two: Change the things that don't work and adjust your behaviour. Move on. Stay glued to your chair and make them pay your salary and redundancy, while looking for a new job. It is much cheaper for the company if you quit. Therefore, you don't quit. If HR wants you to quit, that means you owe the ...


6

First of all, you should be honest about your physical location, your citizenship/immigration status, because there are legal and tax implications. A company may or may not be able to hire you depending on where you are and your legal status in the country where their offices are based at. However, I would advise that you only communicate these information ...


-3

"Firing you would be some extra work for us, please help us by harming your career" This is a way to interpret, what she did. Of course their problems are their problems, and your career is your career. So, don't resign, but look for your next job. If they fire, you will have more chance. If they don't, you will be able to choose between a switch ...


3

Isn't it a good thing that the head of marketing is a competent liar? Do you really want a head of marketing that always speaks the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth (to your customers/prospects)? I think there is a good chance that your company would be out of business soon if that would be the case.


1

The linkedIn profile could have an error in it that's not in the resume he used to get hired. Some of us have experience in multiple fields but the profile might only focus on one thing. Although the errors in my resume/profile tend to not be in my favor like accidentally shortening experience from 3 years to 1 year. Maybe he didn't lie but management told ...


7

it seemed like he got the job with the fake work history. That's what it is , it "seems". You do not have any "proof" of that. The linkedin profile (unless directly endorsed by the organisation) is a personal entity and technically have no verification process for experience whatsoeversee notes - so you don't even know (or prove) whether ...


13

I would ignore it, especially because the guy is capable. You have no idea what it was he actually used to get hired. Maybe he is just using it to get recruiters to his LinkedIn (I know od junior engineers who have faked LinkedIn experience, sent their resume to a recruiter with their true experience and then gotten an interview) You have no idea whether he ...


6

Especially since "he is capable of his job as Head of Marketing", you should just calm down. The entire thing can turn against you very ugly. An alternative would be to send an anonymous letter to his superiors, but in that way you will not know what actions would be taken against him - although it would not matter much.


11

I just so happen to have had this same, strange phenomenon happen to me recently! It's too weird of a coincidence for me not to answer. As was noted in the comments of your question, this is entirely subjective and based on my unique situation. But you asked for similar experiences, and I think this is the definition of that :) When I saw the email invite ...


2

Gnat already linked you to a very relevant question you should read and consider (How can I push back against my manager and HR trying to extend my relieving date?). My two cents on your situation, given that you need the relieving letter to start a new job: (from your comments): But I am getting no official response. This has become a deadlock. Since I ...


2

The following is based on the experience with my employer, but I guess it is standard practice. When you work for a company it's usually specified in the contract that any rights on any invention, patent, etc. that you develop while working for them belongs to them. If you leave the company you won't be able to claim any rights on any patent you contributed ...


2

You just need to expand on what you have here and let the new people do their job. Clearly articulate:- What you need done (Create a new personnel policy that people will understand and follow). Why you need it done (What issues are a lack of policy causing you?). What have you tried in the past (the previous policies)? Why do you think it failed? You want ...


10

There should be no production scale if this is how you are coming up with it Asking random internet strangers to give you a formula to score employees means that you/your organization doesn't really know how this particular job function works. You evidently have been tasked with creating an evaluation system for the sake of it and your organization is fine ...


2

They can of course fire you. It may be illegal, in which case it will be costly for them if you fight it in court. Most likely it will be illegal, but if it happens, it's still might inconvenient for you. So the best is to avoid the situation. Insisting on a reference from the current employer, especially in August 2020, is very bad behaviour. If they insist,...


10

Since she's been there more than two years she has a reasonable amount of protection - he can't fire her just because there was a reference request. I mean he can go down the redundancy route - but again she's more protected having been there that length of time and if she can demonstrate the close temporal proximity of having been put "at risk of ...


1

Disclaimer: I am not sure of the legal position in the UK but if someone wants to get rid of an employee they will most likely find a way Yes they can. If an employee shows they want to part with their current employer, that impacts on the trusted relationship between the two. There are even jobs where you are escorted out of the building and put on ...


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