New answers tagged

3

I am a woman in STEM, although I don't belong to any 'women in STEM' organisations. Before going into gender issues - you have to ask yourself if there was any non-gendered group that was interested in organising your STEM day? If your company said "someone do this" and only the Women of STEM & Friends agreed then that's what you want to change. Are ...


0

She finds different pretexts for the same issue again and again and draws me into various escalation meetings with the Project Manager and the department lead + many other colleagues. Resulting in a lllooooottt of time wasted for the team. Made her write an agenda for a meeting and bill her for the time wasted. Start with the last meeting and reply to ...


1

Offer my skills to an agency for free? Basically volunteer/intern for them for say, a month to demonstrate my work and ethic. IMHO, I wouldn't recommend working for free, since its as good as starting as a fresher, because even if you did, how will you expect a comparable salary to your experience, even when they start to pay? Offer to start out under ...


0

Are we wrong in feeling alienated by gender-specific clubs organizing company-wide events? To select is to deflect. Favoring one gender is disfavoring the other. Whether this is morally acceptable in this case depends on your personal and political views. Some see sexual discrimination against men in a different light as discrimination against women. This ...


1

It sounds like a very difficult situation for you. Please avoid aggressive responses! Don't escalate the conflict. That will only make the problem worse. Also, you are a team lead, not a manager. It is your manager's job to give the necessary instructions to make this person stop doing this. Ask for advice Can you privately ask your direct manager, or ...


1

she does not have formal role that is of significance Then just say, I don't have time for this and wont be attending. Then go to your manager, or HR and explain these meetings are negatively affecting performance and moral of the team. Propose another solution that would achieve the same thing without the meetings. For example, let everyone take notes ...


5

It seems you are suffering because of the way she forces you into these meetings, and the way the meetings go. Maybe you can talk to the Project Manager and explain how this way of working is affecting your performance. But don't just come with a problem, come with a solution. You see, complaining is easy, and pointing out a problem is too, but if you can ...


1

Ask your professor to explain. That's her job. Some practical questions for you to consider: Why? Always why? Why does the HR professional need the information, who will use it, and what for? Where can an HR professional get a useful questionnaire to give to an industrial engineer? What kind of survey questions would be useful? Does the company have the ...


4

The "correct" answer is what your course (professor) says to be correct.* In practice, most of these categories overlap and there is no straightforward one-to-one mapping. Based on the scenario, scope and circumstances, it might change - so there's no universally correct answer, only what's applicable in a current setting. In case you feel you have a ...


4

Making a job interview appointment with HR is going weird. What should I do? You have already confirmed a time for the interview so you should show up at the time that you agreed to. Remember that this is also your opportunity to interview this company, so take into consideration things like communication when evaluating whether or not this company is a ...


10

I don’t see anything wrong on your end. It’s not your job to be online and available at all times. An HR manager on the other hand, especially one with recruitment duties, should be more informative, flexible and accommodating; none of which seem to apply in the case of the person who handles your case. If you want the job and you don’t have any better ...


5

Different employers have different levels of formality around contact with the outside world, and while brief emails without detailed signature blocks might be a little outside the norm, it's not inherently a problem. And perhaps your replies are getting caught in her spam folder, even though you've checked yours. Although you've said you couldn't find this ...


1

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? Another option is: do neither. Maybe you are not on best terms with your boss, or are afraid to be misunderstood or don't want to be seen as complaining. And that's okay. What is not okay is using the mistake to your own advantage by unfairly ...


4

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? It might entirely be possible that the manager is just keeping a separate note somewhere for all the leaves applied by all the employees (which are approved) and updating the system only once in a while. Though not very common, it's possible. It ...


0

From an ethical standpoint, you agreed to work a certain amount of days for a certain amount of money. So yeah, you should go to (reasonable) amount lengths to remind your boss. From a more cynical, practical standpoint, you should also tell him. It would be fairly easy for your boss to find out if you've been taking too many days off. While he might think ...


3

Do I tell him ? Yes, but do it in writing. You want to create a paper trail that clearly shows that this is not your error or even malicious intent. Not logging time-off correctly is a potentially serious offense that can be interpreted "stealing from the company" or "fraud". You want to make crystal clear that whatever happened is not your fault and that ...


1

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? I'm sure you know what the right thing to do is. I can tell you that most managers would appreciate the honesty.


2

Do I tell him he's forgetting Yes, but in a nice way. Something like: Hello boss, do you remember that you approved me a sick leave on ... (date). I see that it does not appear in the system, and I worry that ... (reason; e.g. you will not have enough vacation days) Will you please verify and eventually enter the info again? You might continue: Maybe ...


1

TL;DR - Anything that can potentially save time and resource for both the parties in the hiring process, is usually welcome. To elaborate: If as an applicant, you are not sure of the job role and responsibilities, it's always better to reach out to the recruiter / point of contact for the job / opening and get clarification, before you submit your ...


1

Plenty of things are acceptable in this space I've cold inmailed alumni on LinkedIn, sent out emails, been referred though mutual connections, etc. Cold calls would be less acceptable because a phone call requires an immediate response while a LinkedIn message can be handled at a convenient time, but I also say this as an introvert who hates being disrupted ...


-2

You should be searching for a new job and get out ASAP. This is not my default answer for workplace bullying; usually I would say something like "go to your manager" or "go to their manager", or, of course, "go to HR". The problem is, this person is HR, and HR is the most important person at the company, in that they have complete control over you. They ...


3

Email your boss and ask for a formal written rules document on office coffee cup disposal policies. CC the HR person, and say that you don't want to upset anyone with your coffee cup usage anymore. make sure you sound like you are doing this for the good of the company and you are genuinely sorry for breaking company rules. No one at a small/mid sized ...


16

If HR is bullying you, you should absolutely not be thinking about leaving. What you should think is "f*** them, bloody idiots". I worked at one place where rumourwise no woman looking better than the female HR manager had any chance of getting a job. Since she is picking on woman younger than her, jealousy is absolutely a possibility, one that you should ...


3

This is one of those 'how do I get someone to have a different personality' questions that we regullarly get on here. unfortunately there isn't usually an easy way. The bully has a pattern of behaviour and protection from management, unless she is aware of her fault and wants to change, it will be difficult to stop this. Bullies usually require ...


24

The simplest approach is to completely ignore, not even an eye roll, anything that can be ignored. If you get an inappropriate e-mail, file it, with notes on the circumstances, but otherwise act as though you never got it. If she does something that cannot reasonably be ignored, discuss with your boss. You can frame it as asking how to deal with the issue.


17

Werent you raised to clean up after yourself? For the record, if I'm working alone very late at night and if the dishwasher is already running, I will continue to leave my mug in the sink until I can get to it before 8 am the next day. If that's a problem for you, there is no need to insult me, nor is there is any need to insult my parents, you can just ...


2

Additionally, ask IT to make 2 emailaddresses: John Smith, with an autoresponder "this person (has changed their name and) can now be reached at Jane Smith" Jane Smith, the account she uses from now on. Now the requirement that people can still find the person are satisfied. People who knew her old name/mailaddress get the necessary information and can ...


4

I think that one point not being addressed here, is that current employees need to know that her name has changed, in order for them (and, to some extent, her) to continue to do their jobs effectively. So, I agree with the other answers that HR should be able to bend the rule in this case, and remove the reference to the previous name in email signatures ...


-1

In short, because they can ask, because it has always been that way, and because everyone else does it. Originally, this was needed before the popularity of internet when official communications were sent via mail. This is so they can send interview schedules and offers. In modern times, no one needs it for an applicant. The reason that it is still there ...


6

As a transgender woman, your friend is always in danger of discrimination. A phonebook entry "Jane (John) Smith" tells everyone in the company she is transgender. Totally different from LGB people where the name doesn't give anyone a clue. So everyone in the company who thinks he can prove his manliness or whatever by picking on a transgender woman may now ...


12

You should be able to negotiate an exception to this rule. However you are probably going to have to make some concessions that address the concerns of HR. The problem from HRs point of view is that people know the name "John Smith", and may know him as a contact with several responsibilities. If those people look in the directory for John Smith and don't ...


18

What would be the best way to explain that to HR in order to convince them to remove the old name? Precisely the actual reason, which you have also mentioned in the question, i.e.: She doesn't want everyone including new colleagues and clients to know than she was called John before However, the company/HR division may have some kind of internal policy ...


-1

First off Stay away from discrimination against someone because of their "illnesses, disabilities, convictions, etc.". Knowing what not to do can be as (or more) important than knowing what to do. Don't ask anything too personal or anything related to topics people (in general) believe would be discriminatory. Under the laws enforced by EEOC, it is ...


7

(ASSUUMING USA) SOURCE: PERSONAL EXPERIENCE I would reach out to your local Vocational Rehabilitation office for some insights, and any charities for specific groups, such as the deaf, the blind, autistic, et cetera. These people specifically can help you craft questions, as well as give you a steady stream of potential candidates, and what ...


5

You asked, what approaches should I adopt in addition to, or differently from, what's typically used so that I can maximize both fairness as well as my company's interests I think the answer to that is basically "nothing." Do nothing differently from what's typically done. In other words, follow the typical process: determine what skills you need, and ...


1

Promotions / hiring for management level happen pretty much like any promotion / hiring. A boss / supervisor / higher level manager evaluates the candidate, and if: there is a position available and the candidate meets the requirements for the position, then the candidate gets the promotion / gets hired. The criteria for evaluating the candidate are ...


8

Do not get into this. It is likely to go badly for you. I went to schools which were absolutely full of the children of people in this situation. Many reasonably wealthy families have the problem of children who are nowhere near suited to taking over the family business. 9 times out of 10, they get given it anyway to keep the peace within the family. ...


10

How can we manage to tell him that family members do not work productively when he is out? You are a marketing coordinator. Unless these family members work for you or the owner asks you about it directly, it's not your job to be the company tattle tale. The owner has decided that he doesn't need to be there often, despite knowing that his family is not ...


6

He knows his family is not capable of keep the company moving forward, so he hired 3 new professionals, which I'm part of. It sounds like he understands this and is trying to take steps to fix it by hiring you three. Ultimately though it sounds like your job is in jeopardy since you were hired to fix this deficiency. My thought is you should sit down with ...


9

The situation you describe has the potential to be quite delicate. It's good that you're interested in ensuring the business is successful and productive, but a family business can be quite challenging to manage. I would suggest that you have a frank discussion with the owner/manager, but be careful to: Listen to the owner about his/her desires for the ...


1

An important part of any job is letting people know when there are problems. If you can't do a job that your boss has assigned because you haven't been trained or are waiting for an answer from another team, you should warn him. When you have problems with another team, your boss can help you - but only if he knows. Equally important: if he knows there's a ...


2

Psychological harassment is not a useful cause I am not contesting your claim, although I feel it is certainly possible to discuss what is and is not harassment, but that is not the crux of my argument. The point I am going to try to make, is that assigning an external cause to your difficulties is not useful for you in any way other than that it is ...


0

I suggest: talk to your supervisor directly to sort out this issue, politely ask him to stop using this kind of language (or write him an email), and tell him that if he continues this kind of communication, you'll write something on his Linkedin asking questions around sucks - even they encourage it, the only reason to ask questions is to learn, yes, but ...


8

I later realized that this is psychological harassment. Now that I'm aware of it. How do I deal with it in the future? I feel that your premise that this is psychological harassment is not necessarily true, although I understand that it can be frustrating. It seems more like a communication problem that was left unattended... Anyways, more important ...


1

You want to take advantage of the furniture delivery aspect of relocation without the actual relocation, thinking that this is cheaper and saves the company money, which should be shared as an incentive. Unfortunately you're misunderstanding the purpose of the relocation package. The point is to offset the additional costs of accepting a distant position ...


1

You aren't understanding what a relocation package is according to their policy. It is to reimburse/cover the employee for moving expenses. $5K is their budget allocated for this, it isn't actual money sitting there to throw at you. Stop trying to game the system, they know more about this than you do, and could end up withdrawing your offer because you can'...


3

Am I just a bad negotiator, or is this corporate America and I need to get used to it? There is a lot to unpack just in this one sentence. “Bad negotiator”? Yes, I think you are, but not quite in the sense you are thinking of. Rather, your whole approach here seems to be regarding the situation as a zero sum game where you are trying to use the leverage you ...


2

They have a policy to cover moving expenses, but do not have a policy to cover buying furniture. While your dedication to saving the company money is admirable, in this case it's misguided or is at least equivalent to tilting at windmills. They can't pay you cash to buy furniture because that's not an approved expense. They can pay to have your newly-...


-3

Any of the answers could be valid for some companies, but there are also those companies (and government agencies) that are just incapable of tolerating, much less considering, a suggestion. When I worked in health care, I learned that Medicare pays according to their price list, and we had to accept that amount, usually far below our cost. (Commercial ...


2

I agree with Simon. Companies, especially larger companies, rely on processes to handle things efficiently. The existing relocation process is fully funded whereas there is never a process to dispense actual cash in hand. Even if it might save the company money (or it might not - it is likely that they have an agreement to pay just the actual cost of the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included