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55

She won't work, and you can't fire her. Your manager would be happy to fire her, but HR won't let you. If you fire her, this work will not be done. If you keep her, this work will not be done. So talk to HR about sending her off on gardening leave - you can apply any restrictions you want, but basically, she is classed as still serving notice (so can't work ...


41

The fact that these long-pending tasks are generally carried out by departing employees seems like you/the company saves them as up. So there are some !*#&-jobs for leavers to do (to punish them). Add to this your firm belief that all of her 4 promotions were solely because of political reasons, the "chauvinistic female laws" you mention and ...


13

A month ago, an employee I manage decided to move out. All the knowledge transfer was complete in the first 2 weeks. ...then her job is, essentially, done. Sure, in an ideal world you'd have the knowledge transfer done and then she'd work hard on any menial tasks that you provide until her time with you is complete. But (exceptional employees aside) it ...


12

How do I get the employee to take up the new tasks? You can't force someone to do something that they don't want to do. Since there is no threat of this employee being fired, they will continue to do whatever they want. To resolve the issue with the new tasks, you need to prioritize all of the current projects that your other employees are working on and ...


9

You write: Departing employees need to do the less interesting tasks. But it seems departing employees don't actually need to do the less interesting tasks (and the tasks are self-evidently unimportant because companies don't leave truly important tasks sitting around for a long time waiting for someone to quit so they can be done by the least motivated ...


8

She doesn't want to be there and you don't really want her there. In fact she may have somewhere else she wants to be, such as another job that will start as soon as she is ready. Work out a compromise. Start by simply offering to let her end her employment now instead of in six weeks time. That may be a good deal for her. If it isn't then sweeten the pot by ...


6

Be very careful about resigning. You don’t state your country, but in many, resigning is legally different from being laid off. Resigning often prevents you from collecting unemployment insurance while you search for a new job. Ideally you would not tell the potential new employer anything. Make it a priority to get resumes out there which say you are ...


4

Tell them the truth during your interviews. There is no shame in admitting what happened. Obviously, find a positive way to describe it. But my point is, you have an excellent excuse for having been laid off.


4

Welcome to the problem with excessively long notice periods (3 months) and why most other countries in the world don't have them. You have zero leverage over an employee who is on their notice period. It's like, if the employee doesn't do their work, what are you going to do, fire them? They've already quit! Meanwhile you are still contractually ...


3

How do I get the employee to take up the new tasks? [from the comments] Departing employees need to do less interesting tasks. Can you challenge that tradition? Why not ask her if there's any useful task she would agree to take on for the remaining time? Unless she's been seriously offended by an attempt to fire her, she might still be willing to ...


1

In IT industry, there is no "Part-Time" culture, otherwise I would be more than happy to embrace it. On the contrary, I worked in the "IT industry" for many, many years. I hired many part-time contractors as programmers, QAers, analysts, etc, etc. Check out contracting agencies and ask them if they can find you a part-time job. If you ...


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