New answers tagged

3

If I'm not mistaken, you need the relieving letter to start at any new place of employment. The fact is, if the above is stated in your relieving letter it would definitely reflect negatively upon you. Even if you were mentally sick, chances are that local laws protect you from people divulging this information. Your best course of action is to consult a ...


-9

Maybe you really had mental sickness? Your description in this question do sound like you may need to consult with a doctor. what action can I take in india Skip the job on your CV and move on. Consult a medical professional.


2

Whether I can ask him to respond to my complaints? Don't ask your superior to respond to your complaints - it sounds rude. Instead, request them for any update on your request (doubles up as a reminder, if your request fell through crack). For anything non-critical, something along the line of: "Dear Boss / Manager / Supervisor, Just checking with you ...


-1

It does not matter. Just keep your funny jokes to yourself and be funny around your friends and family. If you can't stay longer than half an hour without making jokes, make jokes about yourself. How about "I was trained very well with my institute." for a good laugh? What would you think if the candidate made a joke about you or the company? Just because ...


10

I understand the desire to lighten the mood with humor. I do this in interviews as well. Where you went wrong is making a joke at the candidate's expense, rather than including him. That might have been an appropriate joke when you know the candidate a lot better after working together for a while, but not when you've just met. Likewise, self-deprecating ...


2

You were not rude, you don't need to apologise. You commented on how you felt about him that: "he was very professional and that his school had helped him to get there". The interpretation can go either way but that's not something you can control. Like @Jessica mentioned, you've established the company culture, which in my professional experience for ...


5

As no other answer states that, I'll do: If it's possible to be "too professional" for an interview for you, I'm assuming you're working in a very informal environment. If the candidate doesn't like such an informality, he was the wrong candidate and it's good he's out. In the interview for my current employer, one of my now-colleagues was present. He ...


18

You mention: Now for some reason he felt I was rude because even after getting shortlisted for the role he said he don't want to continue and without giving much reason he left. There may very well be other reasons for him to decline your company's offer, apart from you acting unprofessional. You don't know his reasons. There are many things which ...


17

Something the other answers have not yet pointed out but was mentioned in a comment, this was offensive because you were mocking the candidate. It doesn't actually matter much what it was you said, or that you meant it in jest; you directed a remark about the candidate's presentation to other panel members, for your own entertainment. It might not have been ...


7

who was being too professional. What bias does this reflect? How can a candidate be too professional? To which I commented "Institute has trained them very well" in a light humor to other panel members. You are either saying that their behavior is disingenuous, or that they have previous experience that they omitted from the application. Now for ...


90

To which I commented "Institute has trained them very well" in a light humor to other panel members. Now for some reason he felt I was rude because even after getting shortlisted for the role he said he don't want to continue and without giving much reason he left. Was I rude to say that? And how can I correct it? Yes, of course it was rude. ...


26

Yours is a negative comment in the sense that, even if it were meant as a compliment, it is giving credit to the Institute rather than the candidate. It is not the candidate who is capable, but the Institute who made them so. In general, I recommend avoiding doing in-jokes with the interview committee which exclude the candidate, because this creates an us ...


136

The offense here was implying that the candidate is not acting sincerely or in good faith, but only in the way he’s been “trained.” I believe that’s really what you meant to say, so all you can do is apologize, if possible, and say your joke was ill-considered. Most likely this candidate is lost at this point, though. In the future, you should avoid making ...


3

In my career I follow one rule - always ask more than you have had before. Because you got more experience, more knowledge etc. Also I often ask 10%-15% more than I really "cost" because I want to have a buffer for salary negotiations. Don't worry your employer also does the same trick. In your current situation I would ask for 750000 INR since your ...


1

You didn't mention if they require code that would actually run, or one that would not necessarily run as is but would just show them how would you solve the task. I guess it's the second option. The point is to show your software designing abilities and it doesn't depend if you spell a library function correctly. They might be also afraid of you using ...


2

A coder who understands what he is doing might be slower without a web search, but one who can’t complete the job without cut-n-paste will before long paste the wrong thing and not understand it. I think this company may be onto something.


3

Offline references and manuals Depending on what it is that you actually need, are you allowed (and able!) to use offline reference manuals for API functions, parameter names etc? In many cases those would be even integrated in IDE platforms. That should be reasonable, and that should be enough.


3

I'd like to piggy-back off what @Romeo Ninov said in his post: They want to test your way of thinking. This is 100% correct. I recently had a tech interview via video conferencing where I was asked to solve two coding problems. I was allowed to use my language of preference. I couldn't remember the syntax for doing a particular thing in this language ...


1

The employer knows the job and what skills you need to do the job, so I think it's perfectly reasonable. I understand what you are saying but rather it's part of a broken hiring process rather than an unfair one. Many recruiters I have spoken to agree. The employer needs to know what you will do if someone else hasn't already solved the problem. For this, ...


2

This test is not designed to assess your ability to google for solutions or ask questions on stack Overflow. It is designed to analyse how you personally address a problem without aid. You are expected to make errors. You are expected to fail. What they actually want to see is when and how you fail. What type of errors you make. This way they are about to ...


6

Is it fair to test like this? With any part of an interview; it's perfectly fair so long as you are not being singled out. Whatever a business thinks will give it the information needed to make an informed hiring decision is fair for them to ask of you. Always worth remembering though; you are always free to decline any part of an interview - accepting the ...


8

I have to stress that I'm not a fan of tests under these sorts of conditions, they aren't a particularly good test of a candidate's real ability since it's rather rare not to be able able to reference google or similar resources while carrying out real work. That said it doesn't necessarily mean the test is unfair - if all candidates are subjected to the ...


83

To paraphrase Cracking the Coding Interview: Most companies are aware that their tests will result in some false negatives. Particularly at the bigger-name companies that get hundreds and hundreds of applicants-- they're fine with that. What they want to avoid more than anything is false positives. A false positive means that they're wasting their money on ...


19

This test is OK. They do not want to test your ability to search in internet about the things. They want to test your way of thinking. Because programming is to understand the requirements and implement algorithms (IMHO). Errors in the source can be corrected later but if you can't think like programmer you are (probably) not applicable for this position. ...


53

Is it fair to test like this? Is it sensible? I don't know. Is it fair? Yes, it's fair. If the others are asked to do the same thing. It's fair. After all, the point of a test is not necessarily to ace it. It's to compare your performance to the performance of others. In that sense, it's fair. If someone used to code with google and someone can just ...


-3

This isn't school where a 9.5 out of 10 is a grade of "A". Grades cost nothing, this is the real world. Your pay and increases have little to do with your personal performance. It has much more to do with their budget, the current company's financial health, and the market value of your skills. Don't expect to get the increase you want, and even if they give ...


5

The hiring process end when the negotiations are over. That means either contract is signed and employee starts working or at least one part drop. Actually, there are no obligations during the process. If you are invited to (another) interview it may be cancelled. Same way, you are not obligated to go there either. On the other hand it is considered polite ...


11

It's unethical to enter into an interview process when you have no intention of completing it or accepting any resulting offer. This is a deliberate waste of everyone's time, and does indeed deliberately dilute the attention available to other candidates. Otherwise, changing your mind and deciding to withdraw at any point after you start is completely fine. ...


13

As this is tagged India, I don’t know if you’re from there yourself, but keep in mind cultural differences. In many less-developed countries employees have very few rights, should have great respect for the company that employs them, as well as their superiors. Differences between rich and poor are much greater and a lot of people are being exploited for ...


10

In many of the cases, these documents are provided as soft-copies, and not necessarily in a printed version. In my experience, what matters is the authenticity of the document, since this is not to serve as a proper legal document per se (rather, an informational one), it really does not matter what type of material is used for a printed copy. If and ...


42

I am the candidate who backed out of the process. I was told by the officer at college that I brought bad name to the college by doing so. I am not sure what wrong did I do. That's why I am asking question as a third person. – Rohan You took the University's commission away from them (or possibly, if bribery was involved, you nullified the University ...


85

This begs the question whether it is ethical on the part of the candidate to clear two rounds of interview and back out of the final round stating the interview didn't go well? Of course it's ethical. However and whenever a candidate reached the conclusion that they no longer want to carry on, dropping out at that point is the right thing to do. It ...


42

This begs the question whether it is ethical on the part of the candidate to clear two rounds of interview and back out of the final round stating the interview didn't go well? The company has the right to reject up until they make an offer. Heck, companies reject most people they interview. Why doesn't the candidate get the same right? Is it right to ...


212

An interview is a two way process, and just because someone is offered an interview, they are not obligated to take it. At the point either side decides that this is not going to work out: the hiring manager decides they definitely will not hire the applicant, or the applicant deciding they definitely are not going to take the job, it is fine to end the ...


2

No, this really does not matter. If you can prove the expertise on the particular domain you have applied for, and you can prove the employment (not the specific designation related to technology) - that should be enough. The company internal functional title hardly matters.


1

is quitting the job the right decision? No. They’re offering you a great opportunity to learn an interesting new area which will significantly enhance your career and your earning potential.


4

I don't believe AI will ever be needed as an average web developer. The truth is most web developers will just use libraries or services to enable AI without really knowing what it is. You certainly wont need to know the science/maths behind it. However, you have been given an opportunity to learn one of the hottest topics currently in the tech industry. ...


2

Can you clarify: You got a very good performance rating (9.5 out of 10) and that rating was changed by upper management? By someone who has no clue what your performance is? In that case that's quite despicable and dishonest. It is Ok (not nice for you but Ok) if upper management says "your performance was excellent, but we don't have the money or we don't ...


4

I really don't want to change jobs as this one is quite close to my home Does the company know that you don't want to change jobs? If yes, then there is not much you can expect in terms of positive outcomes. Your better ratings were already hushed under the carpet. Negotiations require that you have something that the other party very much desires, and that ...


9

Any suggestions on how to convince management? If you're not happy with the increment you received, you need to ensure your disagreement is communicated properly. You did the correct thing to arrange a meeting with the HR, you may also like to invite your superior in that meeting and present the following points: The contributions you made The value ...


0

There are some excellent answers already given, however I was in a similar situation as what you are, 3 years ago. Web developer title unfortunately is a broad term and incorporates lot of technologies. It can be frontend with something like React or backend with Django/Node/Java or even .NET. It can also demand some knowledge of deployments/dev ops etc. ...


3

I have 1.4 year experience in web development both on front-end and back-end. So you are a very junior software developer. Perhaps just a code monkey (and these are risking their job a lot more than genuine software developers, because by definition they are easily replacable; the economical value of software is concentrated on software design aspects, and ...


4

Something else to consider: Often in web development they really using mean machine learning when they are asking for AI. If that is the case here (I would discuss with your management if you are unsure), that absolutely falls within the purview of Web Development, so I would definitely advise going for learning it as it will certainly benefit you going ...


13

We see this in all aspects of IT / IS industry. Companies want to test-drive data science, so they opt for one of two ways: 1) post job ad for a data scientist, but call it "Python Developer" or "Data Analyst".. and then lump 3 job roles into it (DBA, Analyst, Scientist), and offer them $50k 2) tell some tech person at work to go "learn data science".. ...


9

You really have to make up your mind what you want to do. "Continue working at the company as a web developer" doesn't seem to be one of the possibilities. So you have two choices: Choice 1: Jump head first into the subject of AI and do what you can to learn it. Don't do it for the company, do it for yourself. If you are lucky, you learn something new ...


10

I can't speak for all professions, but in IT you have to learn something new all your life. It's an important part of our career to stay up to date with the latest trends. So, actually, it's totally normal to learn something new. There may not be a lot of web development work to do. You can refuse to learn AI if you don't want to, but in that case you'...


36

We cannot make your decision for you, you need to take the call. If you strongly feel like learning a(ny) new technology / domain is not aligned with your career path and not going to be helpful going forward, then engaging into such activities and assignments is not going to be very fruitful for you and the organization. The way out can be looking for ...


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