189

Is it reasonable to ask my employer for written confirmation that they'll pay for any damages to my personal laptop while using it for work? Yes this is a reasonable request. However, this doesn't address the real issue that your company is not providing you equipment for you to do your job. What would they do if your laptop "broke"? How should I ...


115

If I say, "there were some issues during open enrollment, and unfortunately I was not insured once 2020 began. My only real course of action to gain coverage is to change jobs so that I can get something" will that convey a bad message to potential employers, that they shouldn't trust me and that I will drop the ball with important details? By stating this, ...


78

Firstly, check if your travel insurance covers business, or if it's just a tourist coverage. Secondly... I'd be a bit suspicious of any company that requires me to insure their own property (you can't buy insurance on an item that you don't have any financial interest in), or any company that can't self-insure something as cheap as a laptop (even a Macbook ...


68

No, do not tell your future employer why this is. You are basically openly telling your employer that you only want to work for them for health insurance. That is true of a vast number of people in a vast number of jobs, but nobody says it. When asked about the change after three months, say that you want a different corporate culture and figure out ...


62

Your employer sells what you do for a profit, and must provide you the tools to do your job. I read in the comments that companies exist that allow BYOD, but my opinion is that often this happens because of cheapness and a lack of basic IT safety/security awareness. I'm not talking about external consultants, but employees, obviously. BYOD is a huge ...


54

You have a little bit outside the box problem here. You are voluntarily traveling, this is not for business, but yourself. The company wants to minimize the obvious risk of losing their equipment while you are jetting around the world (their view, not yours) Any insurance YOU buy is NOT going to cover something you do not own, period. You need to have a ...


39

Is it reasonable to ask my employer for written confirmation that they'll pay for any damages to my personal laptop while using it for work? How should I go about asking? And what should I do if they say no? To directly answer your question no that wouldn't be unreasonable, however I think that it's burying the lede somewhat - they should be addressing the ...


32

You asked, Is the truth the best option here? If you are considering leaving your (otherwise satisfying) job simply because you missed open enrollment, then depending on your circumstances, and how you would define "best," that's likely not the best option. If you have no dependents and are generally healthy, you may be able to get fairly low-cost ...


18

Now I am really confused about whether I am eligible for sick money or company gets angry and fires me or I will become homeless. Okay, I really don't know how this escalated from confusion when to hand in a sick note to being afraid of becoming homeless so quickly. I assume you are not from here. This is Germany we are talking about, not some third world ...


16

Would it be bad form to ask for a raise on the raise since it's now costing me more money? You certainly could explain your situation regarding the insurance tier and ask for more money to at least make you whole. I'm guessing that wasn't intentional, and your employer may be able to do something about it. If that fails, ask if you can decline the $283 / ...


16

I get it, a PC with 32G of RAM is not cheap This is wrong - it is cheap compared to the overall cost of employing you (I hope) - but it's not free. They're making me use my personal ASUS gaming laptop for work How did they learn about your gaming laptop? Honestly it sounds like you've brought it up and suggested you use it whilst waiting for a work ...


15

What is the purpose of open enrollment? Why can't insurance elections be made at any time? That is how employer provided insurance works in the United States. They don't want employees to only have insurance when they know they need it. Insurance works because not every person has a big medical bill every month. Some months a person may have zero bills, ...


14

Is the truth the best option here? Well, a truth. The full description you've given here makes you look irresponsible and doesn't show much interest in the new company. There are ways of phrasing it, such as "You offer better benefits" that are technically true and don't reflect as badly on you. But you should also look into whether there are other ways of ...


12

Since your husband was on official business and was driving the car as a matter of performing his job duties, his employer should pay for the damages. This is just as the employer would be liable for any damages that might occur in the workplace as the result of the actions of one of their employees. As you said, he wouldn't have even been there to hit the ...


11

You have some options, but there are a few things to be aware of upfront: First, confirm that the issue was actually on your employer's side (if possible). If it's an internal list of emails that HR compiled and a staff member mistyped your email, that's the HR department's fault. If, on the other hand, you filled out a form for your company and mistyped ...


11

There is a simple fix for this. Your laptop needs to 'break'. How it is 'broken' is up to you. Opening up the chassis and unplugging something may be sufficient. If your work is valued, the process of obtaining a laptop for you will be expedited.


9

Is this normal for a company to cover health insurance of spouse but not subsequent dependents born after the hire date? No, it most certainly is not normal. IANAL or healthcare expert, but I believe under the ACA most employer insurance plans are required to offer coverage (not for free though1) for dependents up to age 262. A newborn child should most ...


9

Is it possible to get a separate plan that or pediatrician would take just for our kids? Certainly. There is nothing that requires you to get your health insurance from your employer. You are always free to purchase insurance on the open market. That insurance could cover your entire family, or just selected family members.


7

When the contract was presented, I inquired about benefits and HR claimed they "will pick up the COBRA costs for your benefits" in an email. This. Refer your HR folks to this email as a basis of your decision and emphasize that you need them to pay the cost. COBRA is the full cost of your insurance benefits which is a sizeable amount most of the time. ...


7

For various reasons, there is a rule of thumb that many companies prohibit the use of personal devices at work - even to forbidding the physical presence of the objects on the premises: laptops, memory devices, photo-audio-video recording devices etc. The main reason: protection of the intellectual property, safety etc. Exceptions exist, of course, and the ...


7

You asked, Who ultimately pays for health care? In the US, it's the payor for your plan that pays the providers for the claims they make. That's a bit of a circuitous answer, but it's essentially the truth. In a true commercial health insurance plan (i.e. a product from United Healthcare, etc) the insurer is the payor. The plan will have members from ...


6

Given that you already work remotely and the equipment is not already insured, you should not be required to insure this equipment just because you are going to a separate remote location. If the company would like their equipment insured, they should do it themselves.


5

If you're that concerned about liability, set up a Ltd company and run your side project through that. Your potential liabilities are then restricted to the assets of the Ltd company (but consult an accountant for details - there are some gotchas). Everything will come down to contracts, so make sure that your (solicitor reviewed) contract includes ...


5

(I am not a lawyer) Your corporation won’t end with the lives of the people who created it. That’s one of the fundamental principles of incorporation. Your articles of incorporation may include rules about succession planning that could (should) cover ownership scenarios, within the laws of your locality pertaining to corporations. Also, depending on your ...


5

For an interview you always wear a suit, unless you have an explicit reason not to, reasons maybe this is a job as a gardener, or the person arranging the interview said "don't bother with a suit we are all casual here". I have worked in UK IT for 20+ years, I have never worn anything other than jeans and jumper to work, but have worn a suit to every ...


5

Never not wear a suit to an interview. It's always better to look too good than not good enough, and physical appearance is the first thing people will see when they look at you. A quick rule of thumb - if you ever feel the need to ask the question "should I wear a suit", the answer is almost certainly Yes. Specifically, the banking and insurance sectors ...


5

Increased pay and benefits is absolutely a valid reason to leave a job. I would not go into specifics though. That doesn't make you look great. Simply state that this job is offering a better pay/benefits package to what you have and you feel you need that to feel secure. However if you can find something else to go with I would. Surely the new company ...


4

Are there other major issues that I should be raising? I am not seeking a list of everything that could happen, just issues that would be universal to all employees impacted by this. The list you have so far is a pretty good start, depending on the goal of your meeting with management. You might wish to ask if your medical records will be automatically ...


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