229

Indeed, they opened the office in country B to save some money and for the business is good, but it's not good for me. Actually it is good for you - if they hadn't opened the office there (to save themselves money) you wouldn't have a job with them. Market rates for a given job with a given skill level vary wildly not only by country but often by region ...


174

Unfortunately, there's no shortcut, it really is a matter of getting familiar with Indian accent, speed, and inflections. These can be very challenging. That said there are some things that will help. If your company hasn't invested in good conference-call/phone equipment, they should, this is exactly what that stuff is designed for! Use a really good ...


112

Communicate with them via email. That also has the advantage that you can review their emails later in case you forget something. It also helps with the timezone difference.


61

You don't. There's a variety of reasons why jobs have different salaries in different countries - general cost of living, taxes, cost of benefits, rental costs for the offices and supporting services, etc. You can't really expect (for example) to live in India and ask for the same salary as someone who works in the USA. It would be nice, but economics ...


56

Whether and how you wear it should depend on the situation. High-stakes business trip to Saudi Arabia? I'd say no. Working with your peers (who know you anyway) in the home office? Probably doesn't make a difference. Instead of trying to make a global yes/no decision, consider the circumstances. I, too, am Jewish but not obviously so (I'm Italian), and ...


36

The way you describe it, it actually sounds like people are trying to be helpful rather than "negative." I have had this situation before, where a foreign colleague of mine, despite his technical skills, would occasionally mangle a sentence so badly that it would sound like the exact opposite of what he was trying to say (I can't remember the exact ...


32

In an environment of native english speakers, this would be fine. In light of the context you have provided, however, you might want to substitute "religiously" with "to the letter" and "follow the process meticulously".


32

I also had this problem when I first started working for an international company where I had colleagues around the globe. Like you, I was struggling to acclimate to specific accents (some rather heavy) that I had little exposure to before. I had a "lightbulb moment", though, when one of my office mates visited an overseas office. When he joined in on the ...


31

Kill 'em with kindness. Always assume people have good intentions (unless they give you a very good reason they don't). Smile, be thankful for their help in correcting you, "oh, I'm sorry, that's what I meant to say!", share a light polite laugh. The main problem is not what your colleagues are doing, it's your self-perception. You are very self-conscious ...


29

Is video chat an option? I have found that in some cases I can understand foreign speakers in a face-to-face conversation, but not as well in a phone conversation. Being able to see the person's mouth and take clues from their body language can be quite helpful in decoding what might sound indecipherable with only audio.


28

Living in the UK, I can tell my bank to put €10,000 into your account, and you will receive €10,000, or I can put U.K.£ X into your account, and you get whatever the bank gives you. If I calculate the exchange rate, there are usually different rates for £ to € and for € to £. So your customer probably picked what was better for them. The customer hasn’t ...


23

Just indicate that your current personal situation is different than it was when you were wanting to move to the country for the job and you can no longer move to the country for a job. If they ask for specifics indicate you rather not discuss it with them as it's personal, but you are very appreciative for the job and regret things not working out so you ...


22

Only the companies you applied to could tell you why you were not selected to go further in the process. However, to improve your odds of being selected there are a few things you can do: Your resume is too long and not standard. As a student you should have a single page resume. It should focus on important skills, accomplishments and facts about you. ...


21

You can ask but it's likely to be both unsuccessful and a bad career move. The reason they employ in your country is for cheaper labour. Paying you the same as a local negates their primary reason. It is possible if you have a special skillset in some fashion that makes it a good business decision. But since you state the skillsets are equivalent it's more ...


21

You do need to learn to understand the dialect of English that most of your colleagues speak, and that is used in meetings. Anything else, such as supplementing meetings with e-mail, will be a workaround that will limit your progress. Indian speakers seem to me to talk very fast, so it may help to ask them to slow down, rather than just repeat what they ...


21

Here's another way to get more familiar with the accent: Ask the colleagues to recommend some English-language podcasts (with Indian hosts), and start listening to them. Because the podcast hosts are probably deliberately speaking a little more slowly and clearly than they might in actual conversation, they first are good training wheels to understand the ...


20

Ask your co-workers. Say something like this: "In the USA, it's our custom to contribute something towards gas money when riding in a car pool. Please tell me what the customs are here in Germany. I would hate to make a social mistake." I believe, having lived in several cultures, that it's almost always appropriate to ask this kind of question about ...


19

You're looking at this incorrectly. It's common (at least in the US) for a company to pay on a different scale depending where the employee is based for the same position. An old employer of mine had four pay scales so a widget maker in Des Moines IA would have a smaller salary for the same job, skills and performance rating then in San Francisco. A ...


18

Accents can be changed. While it's nice that "most people" can understand you, if even 5% of your colleagues are having trouble when they first meet you, then your accent is a career-limiting problem and you should work to reduce it. If two people are equally strong technically, then the person who speaks more clearly is a better hire. I have lived in the ...


18

YMMV, but I've always found that when I talk to people with accents and explain to them that their accent makes it hard for me to understand, they're usually accepting of that, rather than angry. Simply bring up the subject like, Hey guys, sorry but I'm having a lot of trouble understanding what you say to me because of the difference in accent. I'm ...


16

It's fine to just say you want to return to your home country. You don't really need to give further reason. I think people will accept that wanting to return as perfectly reasonable.


14

At a quick look, I saw two issues. One, that you mention, is work authorization. You are applying for jobs in California giving a non-US location with no indication that you are authorized to work in the US. That means additional work for HR compared to other applicants. Why California, rather than India, for an internship? Have you tried e.g. through your ...


14

How I should tell him professionally that I'm interested but need a visa from them to work there? Just say that. "Hi (recruiter), that sounds interesting! I'm not sure if you noticed but I'm based in (city, country). Does the role offer visa sponsorship? If so please contact me at (contact information). I've also attached my CV."


14

We were a team working out of India and were facing similar issues with a sister team in Taiwan. What helped us was a 15 day visit to Taiwan. I found that having spent some time talking to them face to face in the same room gave me a lot of clarity regarding their intent and content despite having trouble understanding the accent. Once we were back to ...


14

I actually did that. I worked remotely for my employer while spending extended amount of time overseas. However I had to quit as a full-time employee and start a company in the USA to make this happen, and, just FYI, setting all of this up to be a fully legal and workable solution was quite an endeavor with a lot of involvement from business tax experts. ...


13

I have seen two people come to England -- one from Eastern Europe, one from China -- with very little working knowledge of English, take a low-paid (low-expectations) job in their field, take English lessons outside of work and practice talking to English people in the office. They both became proficient in the language within a year and moved on to bigger ...


13

You don't need to explain. In fact, a potential employer wouldn't really care about your reasons, only about your credentials and skills. If you can show that you can be of value for them, and if there is a reasonably easy way for you to immigrate then your chances are good, otherwise you would have to prove some really unique capabilities to get someone to ...


12

Generally speaking, it is your responsibility to make yourself understood. As a non-native, you do have a harder job than a native. It is legitimate for your colleagues to comment on your accent if they don't understand you. If they're mocking you or disparaging you, it's definitely inappropriate. However, there is a good chance that they simply don't ...


12

I haven't been in this situation myself; however, I would be very reluctant to accept a job in another country without seeing (and signing) the contract first. I don't know the countries involved (you should provide this information). However, you are saying that you would uproot yourself from your current country and move yourself and your family ...


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