63

It may very well happen that the organization has a policy for standard minimum reimbursement amount, and your expenditure was lower than that threshold. So you get the minimum amount ($100) as per the company norms. Also, are you certain that they did not mention any reimbursement (with or without the charge slips / invoice) for your time (for travelling ...


27

The most likely explaination is that they have some minimum reimbursement amount or whoever was responsible decided to not do the math or look it up and go for a round 100$ instead. The reason this is likely is that a company who wants to interview badly enough to fly you in a chartered jet (!) likely cares nothing for a 50 bucks difference in uber ...


13

Clearly it was intentional, since the number is so round. This is simply how they decided to handle things, and there absolutely no reason to follow up on this. I think you worry too much about it. It almost like a waiter being concerned if he is stealing from the customer by accepting a tip. Or, in the business world it's like, somebody asks you for 50 ...


13

I'm going to be blunt: this is an internship that only lasts a few months; the person hiring you doesn't expect you to accomplish anything important, doesn't care about your skills (apart from being able to perform the task you're being hired to work on) and probably wants as little interaction with you as possible. That might sound really mean. But you ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


9

It may be that they already have a stack of gift cards and it was easy for them to just send one out. Like was said above, if they can afford a chartered jet to fly out a prospective intern I don't think they're sweating the $50 difference.


6

Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? No, it's none of their business. Information is valuable, you don't give it out without a clear reason and idea of how it will benefit you. Additionally you would be giving away information that involves your employer to another company.


5

Work experience covers any experience you have. It could be paying jobs. This could be related to your area of interest, or unrelated. It could be volunteer positions: helping at day camp, tutoring after school.... It could be other internships. If your choice is a blank/sparse work history and adding something you are not sure you should include, then ...


4

I wouldn't tell them where, but telling them why may help them. If they're honest about wanting to know why so that they can address their deficiencies then that certainly can't do any harm.


4

Interviewer: So are you familiar with git, things like branching, merging, rebasing...? "Yes, I have been using git since my first semester of university. Whenever I'm in a group project, I'm usually the one merging all the pull requests into the master branch. Just take a look at my repositories on github." The interviewer probably won't take a deep ...


3

I don't know both the sides of the story- so I can't arrive at any conclusion, however, don't assume malice and always expect good intentions. I'll try to clarify some points: no matter what I do there is always something wrong with it. Even when I did the same thing before and everything was fine at first. Q: Is it possible that the supervisors are ...


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


3

They owed you cash. You didn't get cash. You are being partially paid for the inconvenience of being paid by a Visa gift card instead of the cash you are entitled to. My friends often say "that item, plus $6, will get you a small coffee at Starbucks" to insult the valuelessness of the item. Actually, this thing, plus $6, will get you a small coffee + a ...


2

It was a round number, so someone decided that you should get $100. I’ve heard of a place that always reimbursed $100 too much. If you asked for $216.59 they’d pay $316.59 as a final interview test to check if you’re honest - losing $100 is much cheaper than hiring a dishonest person.


2

From what you wrote, this does not sound like you where doing something horribly wrong. But even if an interview goes well, you don´t always get the job. There may be someone more skilled, cheaper or more the bosses son they ´ll go for. There are some things to think about, though. The main thing, I think is: Ask questions yourself. A good interview is not ...


2

Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? If he asks: sure, why not? I liked the recruiter for Company B, so I'm willing to talk to him. As it happens I told him I was going to Company A because their product, and therefore what I'd be working on, better aligned with my interests. I'd tell anyone that, even a bunch of unknown people on the ...


2

I am on the other side of the table, in a very similar situation (well, the two projects we are offering are NLP and ML related, but you get the idea...). Every company is different, but still let me explain how this is seen from the other side. In our case we took the initiative and explained the candidates that, while the projects are still not completely ...


2

How to accept internship offer but keep the ability to renege? and I will be scheduling a site tour next month that will be very exciting. They are not going to allow this. Were you talking a few days, then perhaps. But you are talking timelines of months and months. If you renege several months from now, they would need to restart the process from ...


1

What I would do: Call Company A and ask them how long the hiring process will take and if they can speed it up, since you already have another offer. Ask Company B how long they can wait for your final decision. Ideally, you will have a time slot where you have offers from both on the table. If this does not work out, you have to decide. You can surely ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


1

When I was in school I found this very confusing as well. I was a student, how on earth did companies expect me to have relevant work experience? At your level I would include anything even somewhat relevant and even some thing that aren't (for example, unrelated extracurriculars). If you work a part-time job unrelated to your field, include that. If you ...


1

If Company B decides to hire someone else instead of you, should they tell you who they hired and what made them hire that person?


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