259

In the end you need to do what's right for you. Just explain that you are going to go on and further your education and so this is what you're doing. As for the timing--put it back on them. Explain that you would have given more notice had they extended the offer earlier. But you were waiting for the offer to make your intentions known. You owe ...


54

...he tried to make me feel bad for not telling him beforehand. He basically took for granted that I would accept their offer and keep working for them. He wants me to keep working until mid August in order for him to find another person to take my place, and not to fall behind on work when he leaves for his vacation this summer. Your boss is a short-...


23

Keep in mind that all your boss wants is cheap labor. If he wanted you that much, he could have offered you enough to make you stay there; but he didn't offer enough. Obviously, you don't matter to him that much as you, as a person, all he wants is a cog in the machine to keep grinding. You don't have any more obligation to him than his attitude deserves. ...


20

I think you're overshooting here. It sounds like you're still in college, so I'll answer based on that assumption. I have over thirteen documented vulnerabilities in my resume and six CVE's assigned to my name. This is of course fantastic. It certainly gives you a leg up compared to most other candidates your age. But here's the thing - most companies ...


14

I was wondering if it's polite or okay to decline and hopefully forward/attach my friend's resume who meet the same qualifications? It's very reasonable to politely decline and offer your friend's resume as "someone who might help you". I'm assuming you have your friend's permission first.


14

You should not be faulted for making a meaningful decision about what you want to do with your life. You had already given your boss feedback that there were other options you were considering pursuing. He either assumed he could win you over or ignored what you said. Neither one of those is your fault. Unfortunately, this is probably not the last time ...


10

I have been in something similar to your situation, though with less provenance, but I hadn't handled it well - dropped my college side job (where I handled 2x the average workload for 1/4 the average pay), which I later came to regret. Now I have, among others, one exceptional 22 year old and a few average ~30 year old developers working for me. The 22 ...


9

You're obviously a decent person and that is being used against you. I was similar situation a few times in my career so I speak from experience on this. I'm going to a little brash here and say it how I see it. Your boss was basically manipulating you to make you think that a perfectly acceptable decision is wrong. Your own physical and mental well ...


9

Should I give her a call tomorrow? Yes. Whenever you need specific answers to your questions, ask them in person or at least use the telephone. You can always send an email confirming what you heard if for some reason you need a "paper trail". As you have seen, emails can more easily be ignored. Emails can also be answered partially. While convenient, ...


7

How bad would it be to cancel the internship? Does anyone have any advice on how to do so gracefully? It depends on the relationship you have with the organization. It will not be positive but it also is not unexpected. The earlier you tell them the longer it gives them to find a replacement. Be concise, conciliatory and honest. Taking a step back, you ...


7

Should I give her a call tomorrow? Yep. To be honest with 20/20 hindsight you might have tried calling earlier but realistically I think your best bet is probably to try calling now. You've still got a week or so to try getting hold of them by phone but in the worst case you have had written confirmation that " everything was set for me to start June 3rd" ...


5

Doing it shortly after you see it wasn't on your check is perfect. Trying to pre-emptively remind him is overly assertive, but as soon as you see it's not on the next check - ask him. When you ask him - also ask him an estimated time you should see it and/or check in with him again. I'd expect a knowledgeable boss to be able to say: "I've put the request ...


5

From one of your (the OP's) comments : [T]he contract [...] states that the goal of the internship is educational. Which it was until now. Im currently implementing my research. This research includes proofs of concepts and documentation of which i graduated. but now im building an application that is based on my research Without knowing the specifics of ...


4

If you’re unhappy with your salary, you can certainly negotiate it. However, I don’t think you’re experiencing age discrimination - rather you are being compensated for the skills you do have (technical) and should expect greater compensation as you demonstrate additional skills (behavioral and social). While you do have some technical swagger, you are ...


4

Keep in mind that real life comes in more shades of grey than you can see on an ATI Radeon. Intent is a highly subjective matter. Any conversation may be interpreted in a number of ways; many of which can be correct, many wrong and many of them correct and wrong at the same time. Your boss may have been having a tough day after getting told off by his boss, ...


3

You should get a chance to ask these questions at the end of the interview. It's pretty common for the interviewers last question to ask if you have any questions. Ideally you would ask about more than just compensation at this point, e.g. general questions about the position, company etc. Depending on the interview style you may find an opportunity to ...


2

Should I be applying as an intern? If you want a full time job then apply for a full time job and tell them your expected availability. I don't feel like I am very strong in my data structures and algo should I be worried? I don't expect that a company that would hire someone straight out of school would expect them to be an expert or to have any real ...


2

An approach I've used that has worked well is that I expect 30 days notice, and if I haven't been informed of an extension within 30 days of my end date then I will start looking for new employment with the expectation that my current gig here is ending at the contract date. That puts the burden on the employer to make a decision 30 days out, which is ...


2

Email is good. Just shoot him an email "Hey boss, was wondering if you'd had a chance to put in that raise you mentioned on such and such date? I noticed it wasn't on my last check". It's always good to have a response in writing. If he responds with ANYTHING to indicate he agreed to it, it's hard to back out at that point and you can hold him to it.


2

Should I bring up the salary question? And if yes do you have tips on how to do it ? Yes, you definitely should bring up the salary discussion. You should be comfortable you are being compensated according to you market worth and what specific skills you bring to the employment table. As to how, given you are in cybersecurity, you should focus on the ...


2

Simple. Ask both parties if it's OK.


2

How did they make you feel guilty? They're obviously surprised you didn't take their offer, which suggests they have no reason to believe you didn't like working for them and consider the offer to be a fair one (whether either is true I'll leave out of consideration as you didn't mention anything about it). In the current economy, it's often hard for fresh ...


2

My understanding is that it would usually be illegal in the UK to have an unpaid internship of this nature, so I'd guess it's paid. That being said, I'd have clarified this up front - it's a perfectly reasonable question to ask before the interview, and saves potential time-wasting later. Would it be appropriate at the end of my interview tomorrow, or ...


2

A lot of people are making assumptions about (bad) intentions the boss might have, or responsibilities on your side. In the business world an intern has NO responsibility for staying longer than his contract. (Assuming no explicit agreements were made regarding this). So that leaves the intentions. I would be cautious to assume intentions of someone you ...


1

I would like to suggest another option if it is possible and you feel that you have time to do so. And also if it is possible in with the assignments you have. If you don't want to burn any bridges, say that you will consider coming back to work for them when you have finished studying. Furthermore, check if it is possible to work extra hours here and there ...


1

Definitely calling them is a good idea, but as a side note, this would be a red flag to me. Presumably the person you are working with for the hiring process is part of HR, and you have a picture of how HR operates in this company: they are not prompt with replying to inquiries, they often forget to do things, they need constant prodding to get anything ...


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