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394

I was hired for a 2.5 month contract. I was warned by friends and family not to throw myself into the work and not finish too quickly. I ignored them, and did the job in 3 weeks. My employer had me budgeted for the full 2.5 months (I did not know this when I did the job). When I finished early, I was asked to assist with a process that was taking 10 ...


351

How should I best approach this situation with my manager? As I said, I took the feedback very seriously and want to show that I am a dedicated part of the team. As Mr Brancsyk said in his thoroughly accurate comments, you shouldn't "approach this situation" with your manager at all. You should quit and find something else. There are a number of red flags ...


291

Fixing the bug is not your responsibility. should I provide the assistance for free since it is my morale responsibility No. It is not your moral or legal responsibility to provide free help. You are not their employee anymore. I made sure to leave extensive documentation on how to use the program and how to edit the source code should they need to. ...


276

I don't think laughing it off is the proper approach. They need to learn that they are not in school anymore. That being said, I don't think you should take it too far the other way either. I would recommend that you be firm with him/her and say something to the effect of: The reason we went over naming conventions is because they are very important. ...


261

In the end you need to do what's right for you. Just explain that you are going to go on and further your education and so this is what you're doing. As for the timing--put it back on them. Explain that you would have given more notice had they extended the offer earlier. But you were waiting for the offer to make your intentions known. You owe ...


223

Meet her for a coffee. (If you're a guy, mention that it's to talk about her career and meet her in a totally non-romantic setting, otherwise she might get scared you are interested in her romantically). During a 1:1 conversation there are plenty of ways you can say something without saying anything that could cost you your job: ask her about her plans - ...


216

In an 8 hour shift, at minimum you should take two 15 minute breaks, and a 30-60 lunch break. The 15 minute breaks are on the clock, the longer lunch break is not. Additionally, you mention in one of your comments that your job involves writing code. Programming requires mental breaks to be effective. Programming is very cerebral; it's not a job where you ...


195

Well, HR screwed up. Your manager shouldn't do anything that gets him into trouble, and nor should you. If HR says nothing can be done, it means someone screwed up and nobody wants to admit they screwed up. You started a week earlier, you worked the week, and you are owed the money. You seem to have plenty of witnesses that you actually worked, and that ...


193

Should I just make up an excuse not to go even though I'll risk my boss being upset with me? No. You are making far too big a deal of this. Just go, be part of the photo shoot, then give your notice once the details of your new job are formally worked out.


187

First step is to apologize to the intern. It's likely both of you are frustrated with how the time has been going. If the intern has had a year of college, it means they are basically a high school student still. Not a professional software developer. You need to set your expectations more correct. Often (most?) internships aren't really value-add in ...


175

I was in the same boat before when interviewing a candidate — he showed up half an hour late, and didn't offer an apology. This also really annoyed me, as I had rearranged my afternoon for the interview. So I indirectly prompted him to give an explanation on why he was late (e.g. "Did you have trouble finding the place?") — but it turns out he wasn't late ...


163

Talk to your academic adviser. That is a person in your home department who is responsible for helping students progress. Come prepared with: initial scope of work timeline / schedule / something that says initial scope of work is almost finished email from your manager saying "hey, there is more work, and I know that's a lot, but you can finish it from ...


162

This is a great way to burn bridges Simply put; don't accept an offer if you do not honestly intend to do the job. Especially when leaving school, your reputation is lacking and any bump against you can make life significantly harder. When you accept a job offer, that company will often stop recruitment and inform the other candidates that they weren't ...


154

Unless this developer has given you indications of being territorial about this project or being generally incredibly proud/arrogant/know-it-all, you don't need to worry about it. The code I wrote 8 years ago sucked. The code I wrote last week will suck if I look at it in 8 weeks, let alone 8 years. Let the senior drive the conversation/review. Don't poke ...


154

What is in your contract? If there is no written contract, no problem. You just say thank you but no, thank you, that's not the deal we had, and walk away. Stress the part about meetings and completion date changes certainly not being what you agreed to. You have no obligation to respect deal you didn't make. If the contract you signed does not say a thing ...


150

I would say you reacted well to ensuring your job security and what's best for you. You however have most likely burnt most bridges at Company A depending on what you meant by 'heated reply'. But would you want to reapply at company A anyway if you're at the place you'd prefer to be now? Company A have already shown some major red flags and you haven't ...


141

Stay out of it. This issue is between your co-worker and his boss. Ratting him out will not end well. If you do decide to rat him out, it could look like you are just posturing to make yourself look better so they will hire you over him. It could also look like you are going to blow the whistle about everything which management will probably frown upon ...


141

First of all, what I believe, HR should not have disclosed this information in first place. However, given the situation, I strongly suggest not to disclose it. As I read it, it's still a company secret (yet to be revealed officially), so not your place to reveal it. Alongside that, it's a good chance to teach yourself how to handle the confidential ...


139

Should I stop deciding my own working hours? Yes. You don't know if the other employees are contracted to different hours, or regularly work from home, or have private understandings with management. For example, they may have traded some regular hours for being on-call over evenings and weekends should problems arise. It might be considered acceptable for ...


137

Seriously, quit. Your company has deeper problems than making interns work unpaid overtime; the company is run in an unethical way. If you are finishing the tasks that you have committed to during the day, yet they are down marking you because you are not working overtime, management is the problem, not you. As a Project manager I would never ever do that ...


136

If you don't sign a contract, you don't have a new job. Go to the photoshoot. There are ways to deal with it later if required. This is the same as the other 2 answers but couldn't resist adding the photo :)


135

Personally, I'd have security escort you right out of the building, and ship your personal items to you, and flag your file with "Do not rehire". You clearly violated policy by attempting to circumvent security. If you cannot come up with some solid and amazingly urgent business reason to circumvent security, violate protocols, and put your company at risk ...


133

Clearly, you are not managing these interns the way they need to be managed. It may well be unfair that they need to be managed so differently from typical employees, who want to accomplish, but this is the hand you were dealt. Here is what I would do. First, I would gather them all together for an intern meeting. I would give them the following information,...


131

Sometimes I just can't get anything done. Sure, I come into the office, putter around, check my email every ten seconds, read the web, even do a few brainless tasks like paying the American Express bill. But getting back into the flow of writing code just doesn't happen. These bouts of unproductiveness usually last for a day or two. But there have ...


120

If they are asking you in the middle of your work, when/if you're busy writing software, politely decline. There's nothing wrong with going and washing the pot when you're there and need to use it, but if someone is interrupting your actual job just so they don't have to get their hands wet, that is rude. Don't tolerate unacceptable behavior. Don't be a yes ...


118

You are being used, get out. Development companies have enough money to pay for interns that are just studying. You are actually working for free.


118

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


116

First off, congrats on getting offered a position after your internship. That means they like what they see. A lot of new grads aren't getting positions these days, so that's awesome! Second, if you have the skills to thrive on the web team, you'll have the skills to thrive on the BI team. They're the same skills with a different application of the skills. ...


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