Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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I was hired for a 2.5 month contract. I was warned by friends and family not to throw myself into the work and not finish too quickly. I ignored them, and did the job in 3 weeks. My employer had me budgeted for the full 2.5 months (I did not know this when I did the job). When I finished early, I was asked to assist with a process that was taking 10 ...


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In the end you need to do what's right for you. Just explain that you are going to go on and further your education and so this is what you're doing. As for the timing--put it back on them. Explain that you would have given more notice had they extended the offer earlier. But you were waiting for the offer to make your intentions known. You owe ...


163

Talk to your academic adviser. That is a person in your home department who is responsible for helping students progress. Come prepared with: initial scope of work timeline / schedule / something that says initial scope of work is almost finished email from your manager saying "hey, there is more work, and I know that's a lot, but you can finish it from ...


162

This is a great way to burn bridges Simply put; don't accept an offer if you do not honestly intend to do the job. Especially when leaving school, your reputation is lacking and any bump against you can make life significantly harder. When you accept a job offer, that company will often stop recruitment and inform the other candidates that they weren't ...


154

What is in your contract? If there is no written contract, no problem. You just say thank you but no, thank you, that's not the deal we had, and walk away. Stress the part about meetings and completion date changes certainly not being what you agreed to. You have no obligation to respect deal you didn't make. If the contract you signed does not say a thing ...


150

I would say you reacted well to ensuring your job security and what's best for you. You however have most likely burnt most bridges at Company A depending on what you meant by 'heated reply'. But would you want to reapply at company A anyway if you're at the place you'd prefer to be now? Company A have already shown some major red flags and you haven't ...


141

First of all, what I believe, HR should not have disclosed this information in first place. However, given the situation, I strongly suggest not to disclose it. As I read it, it's still a company secret (yet to be revealed officially), so not your place to reveal it. Alongside that, it's a good chance to teach yourself how to handle the confidential ...


118

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


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suggestions on how to do this is a less offensive manner? There is nothing offensive about declining a handshake because of a medical condition. Just politely decline saying you have a sore hand if you don't want to go into nitty gritty details.


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Was my response an overreaction, how else could I have got my point across? Quoting from your post: Honestly, I was irritated by him questioning the completely reasonable and simple request - although I also realize that he was attempting to gain more context to the reasoning behind the request. I think that, as this person was an intern (that is, he/...


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Short Answer: If you have budget and requirement for an internship, then that is on offer. This person can choose to take that or not. If the role you have available is for an intern, then that is what you are offering. The person is applying for an internship as this is a requirement for their course. In the end, you have a role you are offering, and ...


82

Wow. The senior dev sounds like a complete creep. Are her weirded-out, uncomfortable feelings justified? Yes, I think you'd struggle to find anyone who would consider this as reasonable or normal behaviour. It's not standard practice in the industry - far from it. If (as a senior dev), I want to review work, I sit with the intern and we go through ...


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What if a company you were interested in offered you a job but then rescinded it after finding a candidate they like more? Don't do it.


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Should I go ahead and ask for a raise for the last month of work? I would suggest not to do it. There is not much time left for your internship, and it would not look good on your part to ask more money when the project is critical. Also, it seems to me that your initial 1.5 months were not stressful, so looks like this extra work has been coming your way ...


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I'm going through this myself and straight up say that I can't shake hands because it's sore. If asked I don't mind saying it's because it's a form of arthritis. There's more of us out there than you might think - I actually work with a couple of people in the same boat. If he's not already done so, he should see a rheumatologist as there's some great ...


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These rules were not being strictly enforced and we became lax with keeping our safety glasses on. Your intern reacted confused, because suddenly the informal rule you all followed (that PPE gear is optional) was no longer the rule to follow; instead now the real rule was to be followed. As for what you could have done differently: You could have explained ...


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Given that he is an intern and is not likely to understand professionalism in the workplace, I would go with your second option first: approach him privately and inform him that I know he is not the author of this code, explain that the purpose of the internship is to learn, and by copying the code he is not improving his chances of employment, but ...


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No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


54

...he tried to make me feel bad for not telling him beforehand. He basically took for granted that I would accept their offer and keep working for them. He wants me to keep working until mid August in order for him to find another person to take my place, and not to fall behind on work when he leaves for his vacation this summer. Your boss is a short-...


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You can expect your bridges to be extra crispy. You acted in bad faith and broke your word. Now, the real question is "Will this follow me". To some degree, yes. How long and how far is anybody's guess, but our actions do not exist in a vacuum. Many industries draw from a surprisingly small pool of people. I have seen the same people over and over and ...


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I'm not sure I understood well so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. You have an offer of internship from Company A You don't really want to work in this sector but any offer is better than no offer If you can land an other offer in a different sector you're likely to accept it. If I'm correct you're describing a common state of looking for a job when ...


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HR told you not to tell him You're saying telling him is a bad idea. And you're asking should I tell him? What do you think? Edit: Best not to overthink this issue. I think with a little bit of common sense you can see the answer has already been given to you. Best not to tell him.


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The problem here is you already proved to them you can and will do it for $15/hr as you already did part of it. Unfortunately, we often don't get to pick and choose our tasks. If you decline doing this, you will more than likely be terminated for not doing what was asked of you and they will just hire someone who is willing to do it for $15/hr (trust me ...


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I fully agree with the answer of @AdzzzUK. I am a team lead (male, senior), and his behavior is unimaginably nonprofessional. If so, what advice can I give her for the situation? Read the IT/security guidelines of the company. If these forbid such kinds of behavior, then report it to the IT/security. If I would be IT and I would learn that people ...


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I think you're overshooting here. It sounds like you're still in college, so I'll answer based on that assumption. I have over thirteen documented vulnerabilities in my resume and six CVE's assigned to my name. This is of course fantastic. It certainly gives you a leg up compared to most other candidates your age. But here's the thing - most companies ...


29

It's odd to have a completion date for a non-contractual arrangement (there being no compensation, it's hard to view this as a trade). You can amicably inform them that the position they have kindly offered you is no longer appealing to you, and you will not require access to their systems in future. Obviously, you need to return anything which was lent to ...


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This happened to me in college. I had an autoimmune thing going on while I was trying to get a job and was at job fairs constantly. It was an arthritic reaction that I was going though. I wrapped my right hand in an ace wrap, and then carried a folder of resumes in my left. This deterred most people from shaking my hand because it was injured. If they ...


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You have an opportunity here. Let's say you don't do what you've been tasked with: They will fire you. You don't have a job and you were fired, which is a bad mark for someone who is searching for a new job. Let's say you do what you've been tasked with: Either they lay you off or you get hired permanently. If you get laid off it's not as bad as being ...


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I don't want the reason the interns I mentored to not be hired to be I did not give them enough work. I wouldn't look at it that way. Bob didn't meet Alice's interns because she assigned them too much work. He met them because it was a chance encounter. He could have very well walked by your area when her interns were all in a meeting and yours weren't. ...


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