242

I agree with the answers about taking initiative, but I have some real experience to share so am answering separately. For one of my college internships in EE, I went to work for a large prominent computer manufacturer. I got assigned to a group writing firmware for modems (yes, I’m old) and they basically stuck me in a room by myself with a bunch of ...


139

The appropriate thing to do here is to ask to be paid. They're not training you in web development (or the fashion industry), they're just using you for free labour. Look up contract web developer rates and start from there. I see comments about how you could cripple the company - use this to your advantage to get a fair deal. At this stage they have ...


136

Two points: A degree is more than technical skills. Web Development "high-demand skills" go obsolete every 5 years. I've been around before Google existed. Hard to imagine, but the internet predated Google by multiple decades. I was in NGO organizations dealing with Netscape and IE5/6 compatibility issues as CSS started rolling out. Guess what? ...


103

It may very well be the case that the organization has a policy for standard minimum reimbursement amount, and your expenditure was lower than that threshold. So you get the minimum amount ($100) as per the company norms. Also, are you certain that they did not mention any reimbursement (with or without the charge slips / invoice) for your time (for ...


82

Proceed with caution Many answers here have said "sure, go ahead and say something, just don't be judgey". I want to emphasize that anything you say could be interpreted as being judgmental even if it's not meant that way. Consider, for one thing, that some fraction of the colleagues may feel that they are being "edgy" or "...


67

Should I go ahead and ask for a raise for the last month of work? I would suggest not to do it. There is not much time left for your internship, and it would not look good on your part to ask more money when the project is critical. Also, it seems to me that your initial 1.5 months were not stressful, so looks like this extra work has been coming your way ...


63

A CS education (including a college degree) will teach you timeless concepts. It may use seemingly outdated languages for that, but it's the concepts that matter, not whether you place the semicolon at the end of the line or not. That is why you may think "this is not directly related to what I do right now". It isn't. It is related to the basic ...


59

Your situation is far from uncommon. Many internships end up being warm bodies thrown at problems that need to be done, but the FTE's don't have time to get around to doing. Understand this from the employer's perspective. You are young, have zero experience, and young people have gotten a nasty reputation over recent years as being overly entitled, ...


54

No, they will not agree to that, because even they can't predict what is going to happen. Your best course is to talk with the recruiter/hiring manager directly and try to get a feel for what is happening. Also, while many pre-COVID internships are being rescinded, I would expect that a company willing to offer one now expects to be able to keep their word....


50

I read through some of the comments and it sounds like you don't quite understand what's going on here. They are not compensating you. Therefore you have no reason to be there. If you call them one day and say "hey, I quit" and then just stop showing up, what are they going to do? As an intern, you have no benefits. You have no salary. You have no ...


39

The most likely explaination is that they have some minimum reimbursement amount or whoever was responsible decided to not do the math or look it up and go for a round 100$ instead. The reason this is likely is that a company who wants to interview badly enough to fly you in a chartered jet (!) likely cares nothing for a 50 bucks difference in uber ...


36

You do not take or leave jobs based on what is best for the employer. You take or leave jobs based on what is best for you. It appears that you are at least ok at graphic design. Others might be better, but you're meeting this client's needs. You probably have some other skills, like listening to what the client wants or accepting change requests, that are ...


31

That being said, it's a very nice company and I'd love the experience to put on my CV What experience? You're doing data input! The experience you're receiving is almost completely worthless if you want to become a software developer. I don't care if the company is famous or if you have a nice title. No one cares about that. Anyone reading your resume will ...


28

Can I ask to explicitly state that the internship offer cannot be revoked in their offer letter? Of course, you can ask, but it's not a good idea. First of all: it's pointless. Even if they agree, any statement like this would not be enforceable. There is no legal mechanism that could force them to hire you anyway. The question and following negotiation ...


26

Clearly it was intentional, since the number is so round. This is simply how they decided to handle things, and there absolutely no reason to follow up on this. I think you worry too much about it. It almost like a waiter being concerned if he is stealing from the customer by accepting a tip. Or, in the business world it's like, somebody asks you for 50 ...


26

Do manual work for some time Get typical patterns, use cases Think about how it can be processed automatically or more conveniently using tools Set up 1:1 with your manager and propose your solution Can even develop working minimum viable product (MVP) before the meeting. The manager may not know that is possible or think it would take lots of time until you ...


23

While the other answers are good, they are extremely on the pro-degree side, and I think it's only fair to shine the light on the other side of the world. Is finishing my CS degree critical to being employable as a web developer if I already have good experience and an internship? First of all, single internship as nice as it is, is not equivalent to ...


22

I'm going to be blunt: this is an internship that only lasts a few months; the person hiring you doesn't expect you to accomplish anything important, doesn't care about your skills (apart from being able to perform the task you're being hired to work on) and probably wants as little interaction with you as possible. That might sound really mean. But you ...


21

What do you consider to be friends with someone? I've been friendly towards most of the people I've worked with over my career, and polite to almost the rest of them ( unfortunately, there have been some people that really strain my reserves of being polite), but I would say I've only been friends with a very small number of people I've worked with. So, is ...


20

They owed you cash. You didn't get cash. You are being partially paid for the inconvenience of being paid by a Visa gift card instead of the cash you are entitled to. My friends often say "that item, plus $6, will get you a small coffee at Starbucks" to insult the valuelessness of the item. Actually, this thing, plus $6, will get you a small coffee + a ...


18

It is not clear from the question how you got into this internship. Was it through your school? Or did you answer an advertisement for an internship that would give you "great experience", etc. A sibling of mine had a similar experience once in a different field. A few students were placed in an internship by their school. Unfortunately, the place into ...


18

Just apply without any excuses - if they still want you as an intern you'll be fine, if they don't (because the position is already filled or because you ghosted them) an apology (especially medical/family) wouldn't change anything according to my experience.. And a technical excuse such as 'My computer broke down' or 'I forgot the password of my mail-...


16

I have been working for two months (out of a total of three months) Do you have an actual assignment you have to complete and present at school, or do you just have to work in a company for 3 months? This is important. If you have to present an assignment, make sure you finish that, no matter what else is going on in the company. The project is far ...


16

I have received many awards in my life, including from the CEO of a large (for Canada) organization I have worked for as an intern. I am also Canadian. How I have replied was heavily driven by the culture of the organization and the nature of the award. Absolutely respond. This is absolutely something you should respond to as it was directed at you. ...


16

You haven't mentioned your current location or the location that you plan to seek employment in in the future, and whether those two are the same, so I'll mention an aspect that might or might not be relevant to you: immigration. If this is not relevant to you - you can stop reading here. I landed my first job in IT after my second year of studies and had ...


15

It may be that they already have a stack of gift cards and it was easy for them to just send one out. Like was said above, if they can afford a chartered jet to fly out a prospective intern I don't think they're sweating the $50 difference.


15

I think she can wait for some time and keep her own good use of vocabulary. After a while people will learn about her decorum and then she can start with her endeavor to bring positive change.


15

I didn’t see this mentioned yet. A major reason for me to prefer hiring someone with a degree is because it proves someone can put their mind to something and finish it. It makes it more likely this person won’t leave on a whim. It’s also an indicator for the marshmallow test, will they be able to delay gratification. Obviously exceptions are there but the ...


14

Instead of treating it as calling out a potential error, treat it as an opportunity to say thank you. As others have said, the $100 gift card was probably intentional. There is a slight possibility that it was an honesty check. If you think that could be the case, I would respond as follows: Dear HR, Thank you for the $100 gift card. I wasn't expecting that,...


14

Can you get a job in the future without finishing your degree? Yes. The more interesting question is should you. The answer to that one is more complicated, because it depends on you. Are you a 21-year old college junior? Finish your degree. It will be worth more over the span of your career (in terms of jobs with HR departments that absolutely require it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible