New answers tagged

0

It's a little strange to offer a range, unless he's also offering a tradeoff between stock options / RSUs and money. If he is offering you a tradeoff, please ask another question with more details if you want our help. If it's not a tradeoff: Mentioning a range is probably your would-be boss's clumsy way of starting a salary negotiation. At this point in ...


0

do managers state the range of the salary they will offer Yes it did happen with me as in a big MNC. Your actual salary is decided by HR. Your manager may just have got approval to hire you and he must be aware that at this position, salary varies in this range. Once you say yes (verbally), they may request HR to roll-out a formal offer letter with final ...


5

This does not sound like an offer. It sounds like you were invited to partake in candidate assessment for a regular role. They are saying: "Now your internship is over, would you like to apply to transition across?". Internships do not always flow into regular employment, and not every intern will be invited. An actual offer will contain an exact figure ...


116

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


2

I had 2 interviews scheduled with Company B and C for next week, which I both cancelled by informing them I have accepted another offer in the meantime. It was good of you to be courteous by informing in advance. This potentially saved some work/time for the recruiter and interviewer. what do I do with companies D, E and F, which I have applied to, but ...


25

The other answers have it covered pretty well: no need unless you reach the interview stage. I just want to add that if anything goes wrong with your accepted job and you need to get back on the job market quickly then the applications currently in a pre-interview stage could be a lifesaver. It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with your selected job ...


4

No. If they respond to wanting an interview, then let them know you have accepted another offer.


56

No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


10

Is the 9-5 work schedule supposed to include all thinking time (time where I'm at the drawing board coming up with a solution but not actually implementing anything) and the time I actually get things on paper that my boss can see? Yes. Working time may involve thinking and planning time, as well as developing or implementation time. The problem is ...


0

Within computing, there are a lot of cultural variations. One aspect is how much you are expected to be able to learn by yourself. As others have pointed out, one group in one business is not a large enough sample to project internal culture in all groups in multiple businesses. During interviews, you need to ask about expectations in this area, and make ...


2

Recognize that this is not the end of the world. Big 4, great, but remember there are thousands of companies. Be thankful that you have learned where you might be happiest in your career. Write down what you want to say to your peer and manager. Focus on what you can achieve and deliver. Tell them what you understand and what you need help with. Be ...


9

It's not always obvious what work environment you'll be happy in, and this is one of the great things about internships. They are learning experiences, but not just for technical learning. Across your few internships in college, you to try out different industries, project, company sizes team size etc, and find what culture/projects works the best for you. ...


11

As someone who will be going through a series of internships in the next few years, how can I capitalize on this? How can I phrase a request to my supervisor for them to; put an endorsement on my linkedin, or write a paragraph that I can put in a longform CV I make available to employers I apply to? And what sorts of things should I ask my ...


8

You can ask your colleague for a note on LinkedIn now, and ask him/her to be a long-term reference at the end of your internship. Recommendations belong in recommendation letters or personal conversations between recruiters and past colleagues - not on your resume. If you feel comfortable, there's no reason to delay asking for a LinkedIn comment from your ...


3

Wait till nearly the end of your internship and ask for a written recommendation. This way they can highlight your total successes and quality of work. Once they have given it to you, you can ask that if they have time to hit your linkedin page for a few endorsements. It may be wise to keep a running log of projects and milestones you have completed so ...


-3

You are not a security guard! I understand that Babs may be in an uncomfortable situation, but you are not being paid to solve it, you are being paid to do your job. Anyway, if you hear some yelling, what are you going to do? Break in and punch Clark in the face? Yelling at people and being an asshole are not crimes, as far as my knowledge goes. Also, ...


0

Let both your current and previous managers know about your desire to move back to your old team. Both managers can help you think through your feelings about your previous and current teams. You should expect them both to have your best interests in mind and want to help you find a great place to start your career. Be honest about what you are experiencing ...


3

I'm not sure how to approach the other manager in a way that does not seem too forward. I do really want to start some kind of conversation with him about the subject. Edit: I will be done school May 2020 In my experience, it's too early to talk about a job offer. But if your experience, in your domain and locale indicates otherwise, and if you ...


0

All in all, I think it comes down less to about how to deal with it on an IPS level, but about you being the supervisor and him being the intern. Which not only means there is a chain of command, but also a chain of responsibility. While being the supervior doesn't mean you have to be an asshole (which is not the case, by the way), it still means that you ...


0

The other person will feel better about it if you Justify why you were being lax before "By the way, sorry if I was 'short' about the PPE. You may have noticed they were informal about it in the last work area. It is more important in the new work area, probably because there's either higher risk, or higher supervision, I don't know. But the customer ...


24

It's fantastic that you want to come up with ways to handle that sort of thing better in the future. I think there are both proactive and reactive things you might have approached slightly differently. (It's always easier when you're not in the moment, of course!) You can still go back and do them retoactively now. Proactive Instead of just saying to ...


2

I've been on industrial/petrochemical facilities where not having the required PPE will get you immediately escorted off site. There is no ask/comply phase. The proper response depended on his tone. If it was "I don't understand please enlighten me", a good explanation of how it's not worth risking permanent injury or a big dent to both of your careers ...


5

Interns are fundamentally students (in the US anyway) -- that means they are often used to learning things explicitly, not implicitly. Subtlety is hard to grasp, like what makes one site different from another, whether in strictness of enforcement or actual danger. You can also advise the intern that when in doubt, as the newest person, seeking explicit ...


14

I don't think he was questioning the appropriateness of your instructions. It sounds to me like he may have been scared, not just resistant. As you said, your team does has not been diligent in observing safety protocols, which suggests that you generally don't consider the job too dangerous. The PPE rules seem like arbitrary guidelines, but your normal ...


4

The correct way would have been to explain to your intern why that rule is important: The rules regarding PPE are for their own benefit. We are born with at most two functional eyes, and they have to last our whole life. The small discomfort of wearing protective goggles while working stands in no comparison to the discomfort caused by being permanently ...


25

These rules were not being strictly enforced and we became lax with keeping our safety glasses on. That means that experienced employees, including you, were lax about wearing the safety equipment. The following day; I met this intern for breakfast at the hotel as usual. I asked him to ensure he had his safety glasses with him and was wearing them ...


6

I've found throughout my life that context is everything. You haven't mentioned what kind of work you do and where in the site your team has been going (i.e. what sort of risks you might actually be exposed to). Here's a (possibly) fun anecdote to throw into the mix: A bit of Background about Yours Truly I happen to work in software, although I have ...


61

These rules were not being strictly enforced and we became lax with keeping our safety glasses on. Your intern reacted confused, because suddenly the informal rule you all followed (that PPE gear is optional) was no longer the rule to follow; instead now the real rule was to be followed. As for what you could have done differently: You could have explained ...


87

Was my response an overreaction, how else could I have got my point across? Quoting from your post: Honestly, I was irritated by him questioning the completely reasonable and simple request - although I also realize that he was attempting to gain more context to the reasoning behind the request. I think that, as this person was an intern (that is, he/...


12

You did the right thing to insist your colleague wears appropriate PPE. It's disappointing to hear that not everyone is taking PPE requirements seriously, but a lack of adherence doesn't diminish the importance of proper PPE. Consider taking time to explain your thinking and concern with your colleague. Regardless of his or her status as an intern, he/she ...


0

Here's an example of how I've written this type of career progression on a resume: Vice President/Senior Director/Manager/Staff, Norton Product Management 1996 to 2009 Look at the actual resume to better see the formatting.


3

Distinguish based on title not job description Specify the internship separately from the job on your resume. It doesn't matter whether the job responsibilities changed much or not between designations. Your resume also speaks about how you progressed within the same company. Being on internship followed by a full-time job conveys more information to ...


1

I would just put it in as 6 years experience at the company without special mention of the internship. When a new colleague started at our job my teamlead specifically told him it could take at least 6 to 9 months just to get to know how we work and get started on actually writing code on his own. Up until then he is to figure out what to do on some small "...


0

Simply put a subtitle in the same branch of information. Internship (x time) Job (x time) Description of duties and experience.


0

Having regard for everyone's time You are planning to attend a job fair with no intention to get a full time job. While it's also understandable that you: Do not wish to miss on the opportunity of gaining some first hand experience. Looking for networking opportunities. Just testing the waters as to where you stand when interviewing for IT roles. Looking ...


1

Let the recruiter know that you are only interested in roles that start after you finish your degree or summer internships. The company may be willing to interview you now for a future position, interview you for an internship, or will get back in touch closer to a potential start date. Regardless, being honest about your interests and timeline allows to ...


1

If you literally have no intention or capability to accept a job offer, it would be a waste of everyone's time to attend a typical, formal interview. And, if you're completely unprepared for answering questions, it may not even be very good "practice" since you and the interviewer will likely be thrown off by your lack of substantial answers. On the other ...


1

I have been invited to an interview even though I'm not in search of a job. Should I attend? If you are not looking for a job, attending and/or accepting an invitation to a job interview would not be recommended. First because you will be doing something without a true goal in mind, and you will get nothing from it even if they offered you the job (besides ...


7

Yes. Go. An internship would be huge in getting a more serious job later. Especially if it's in the field you want to be doing and very especially for Physics. If someone tells me they're a Physics major that doesn't tell me if they're trying to be an Electrical Engineer, or a Software Engineer, or a Big Data guy, or what... so if this is the "hand ...


3

The only flaw I seen on your otherwise excellent suggestion to approach him privately and inform him that I know he is not the author of this code, explain that the purpose of the internship is to learn, and by copying the code he is not improving his chances of employment, but ruining them, ask him to delete the code and start over is that you're still ...


0

From my experience, it may mean you may not be "marketing" or selling your or your department's work enough for stakeholders to recognize the value. I am going to use my experience in cybersecurity to illustrate. There are certain positions that are revenue generating and other positions that are often seen as cost silos, particularly to outsiders who may ...


21

The intern has proven that you cannot trust him. He has disobeyed direct instructions and then lied about it to your face. This is a failing of professionalism, but it's also a moral failing, and one that he should have been quit of already. His record looks good... but how much of that record is actually true? How much of that work was his, and how much ...


60

Given that he is an intern and is not likely to understand professionalism in the workplace, I would go with your second option first: approach him privately and inform him that I know he is not the author of this code, explain that the purpose of the internship is to learn, and by copying the code he is not improving his chances of employment, but ...


0

From my experience, it means you're just not communicating ahead of time about what's going on. You don't need to be the most outgoing person, just stick with the facts. Be like an almanac and spit out factual information before they know about it and come to you to ask about it. For example, if you see a delay in your estimation, bring it up before the ...


3

From my empirical experience, what manager-types mean with communication in an IT context: Telling your seniors when you see that something might become a problem, for example when you were given a task to be completed by a certain date, but then you discover that for some reason you cannot finish it by then Telling your manager if something is bothering ...


7

Unfortunately "lack of communication skills" is a broad term. Usually means that you cannot communicate with your peers to effectively perform your duties. Might be related to the fact that English is your second language or could be due to you being introvert or could be they are looking for an excuse to end your internship and are going to use such hardly ...


4

tl;dr Feedback isn't feedback unless it's Specific, Measurable, Realistic. These lead in to SMART (Specific Measurable Agreed-upon Realistic Time-based) goals that are actionable. Use this a prompt to talk to your boss, and find out what they wants from you. "You lack communication skills" is not feedback, it's slander. Just as we close questions for being ...


-3

Warning: You might not be happy with this answer, but there is no secret toolbox. Therefore... Stop acting introvert Last year I had a training with a very experienced psychologist. Someone from the group asked how he could improve his communication skills as an introvert. The answer was straight forward: You can't! You're introvert because of your ...


0

When my group has had interns, we've almost always given them tasks that could be seen as menial work or as programming work. We let the interns figure out which they are. The few times we didn't do this were very frustrating for both ourselves and the interns. We gave them tasks that I could've done when I was in school - but different people are ...


2

I'm going to answer this from a kinda cold perspective: the business doesn't care whether they're underestimating an intern that's going to be there for only 3 months. Because they don't expect you to do anything important. That sounds mean, but... you have to understand, you're not likely going to solve any critical problems for a business, because you've ...


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