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You've got a paying job, which A) puts you in a better position when applying for other jobs, and B) means you're NOT sitting around wondering where the rent's going to come from (unless you're living at home in your parent's basement/your old room/etc). Stay where you are and do the work - which BTW your supervisor is apparently quite happy with, unless he'...


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If you already have something better lined up in late May 2020, with the semester over and most summer jobs begun, then by all means take the better option. "Better" meaning demonstrable improvements in your skill, demonstrable improvements in your references and networking, or demonstrable improvements in pay and/or benefits. You have the benefit of being ...


34

You do not take or leave jobs based on what is best for the employer. You take or leave jobs based on what is best for you. It appears that you are at least ok at graphic design. Others might be better, but you're meeting this client's needs. You probably have some other skills, like listening to what the client wants or accepting change requests, that are ...


8

"Internship you're not qualified for." This is a possibility in vacuum... for someone the boss hasn't worked with before. This isn't a possibility for you. Why? Because the boss has worked with you before, has liked the quality of your work, and wants to keep you onboard. This isn't a question of whether you're not qualified. You absolutely, positively ...


0

Depending on your university, the alumni association may be of great help. They could help you get in touch with previous students now employed, who can in turn put you in touch with the right person in their company.


4

How can I find companies that have engineers/departments within my area of expertise to look for internships bypassing all the recruitment spam which hides the company's names thoroughly? Work with your university's placement office. They usually have lists of companies offering internships.


1

Here are some ideas, you need to judge if they work in your case. do a keywords-based search for companies in your area; example: internship, job, IoT, embedded engineering, ... use "generic" job sites, which present the company names too; save the list, you might need it later; discuss with your professors at the university, ask for company recommendations;...


5

You don't mention where in the world your colleague is working, although I'm assuming from the mention of Fortune 500 that it's probably in the US. Nevertheless, I'll offer the Australian perspective. Profanity is part of the Australian culture, including its professional culture. It's not unusual for s**t, f**k (and derivatives) and c**t to be used ...


-4

Every time I hear someone seemingly misuse God's name (irrespective of being intentionally or not), I will say "Praise to You Lord Jesus Christ" under my breath. If it is seemingly done on purpose, done to shock (i.e. with seemingly bad or worse intent), or some other seemingly big situation, and/or loudly in public, I will sometimes say it out loud so the ...


4

I'm not sure if your friend is ethically justified in joining a group and changing its culture to suit their taste. Why should their subjective sensibilities take priority over those of the majority where there are conflicts? Yes, some compromise is to be expected with certain norms, but swear words are, frankly, most likely harmless to the people in this ...


2

I assume that swearing is used in general terms, not insulting anyone in the company, and especially not insulting you. (I have even seen cases where people who get on with each other very well often exchange insults - that's Ok if both sides agree with that and laugh about it.) If swearing is used against you, that's unacceptable but that would be another ...


80

Proceed with caution Many answers here have said "sure, go ahead and say something, just don't be judgey". I want to emphasize that anything you say could be interpreted as being judgmental even if it's not meant that way. Consider, for one thing, that some fraction of the colleagues may feel that they are being "edgy" or "transgressive" in some sense ...


6

Is it acceptable? Yes. Is it justified? Debatable. Is it a good idea? Not hardly. Swearing may be seen as inappropriate, but it is acceptable. Inappropriate behavior takes place every day, from disrespecting a colleagues time to taking undue credit for others work. You could speak with your manager or colleagues, and they'll most likely change their ...


2

This is a tricky situation. You have a non-trivial conflict here. Excessive swearing is inappropriate in a professional setting. It should stop. For better or for worse, it's part of the current culture, and changing culture needs to be done delicately or you'll end up with hard feelings and blaming. Step 1: Do your research Try to understand how it got ...


9

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? In a good team, everyone should be comfortable bringing up what makes them feel uncomfortable. However, I also read this post which was from coworkers who were annoyed that their new colleague was trying to change the culture. The ...


15

I think she can wait for some time and keep her own good use of vocabulary. After a while people will learn about her decorum and then she can start with her endeavor to bring positive change.


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Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? Will this impact the likehood that she'll get hired after the official internship period is over? Yes, she absolutely should mention it. But it's extremely important to not turn this into a crusade, or some sort of personal vendetta, ...


7

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? Certainly. It shouldn't ever be a problem to politely bring up that a certain behavior is making you uncomfortable. Doesn't mean the other side is going to do anything about it, but at least they'll be aware. It's possible that these people ...


0

I know this post is old, but I totally had a recent similar experience. I was given a packet at the beginning of the internship and told to follow it from word from word. It explained briefly about the assessments that were on the patients. We did not have an hands-on licensed supervisor, instead we had her assistant most of the time. This was definitely a ...


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