New answers tagged

1

I'm going to disagree with the other answers telling you to not raise the issue and to stick it out. You have a field of interest, which is machine learning. You were brought into this company to work on a machine learning project. Your boss, who is on the machine learning team, is not your supervisor, who is the project lead for this other project you're ...


0

I pretty much agree with the other answers about sticking it out. I bet if you paid attention to those around you, you would see that they are not spending all their time on their favorite tasks. Also, for me at least, those infrastructure-type projects have become more important to me as I've gained experience. They make my "main" tasks much more pleasant, ...


10

Being rigid in what you want to learn vs not learn and what you want to work upon vs not work upon will not help you as an Intern to gather practical learning and work experience. Life doesn't always go the way we want it to. Even during regular job, you will many times end up getting (grunt) work/projects/assignments that you will not enjoy. Since you ...


5

I wouldn't bring it up. To me, as a co-op or intern, that fact that you say that you are learning is a good thing. The purpose of such work experiences is to learn and, well, get experience. It seems like you're being asked to do things within the realm of your education and competence and are getting the appropriate support from your company and colleagues ...


0

It sounds like you already know the answer and you just want us to agree with you that you should quit. First, I've never heard of a company which is almost completely run by interns. Normally an internship is a two-way relationship in which you learn about your chosen field, and they get a low-cost employee. The value proposition is usually based on what ...


4

As a rule of thumb you should prioritise your degree ahead of almost anything else. Depending on your location studying can be extremely expensive. Speaking from experience, a 3-year degree in the UK cost me ~£87k due to a combination of tuition fees (9k per year) and lost earning potential (£20k per year). Add to this the amount of time that it takes to ...


6

A intern quitting the job to focus on studying is pretty understandable. Sure, it will look a little weird the 1 month internship, but most recruiters will understand it was a question of priority, and a bad judgement on your part. So, if you feel the internship will jeopardize your degree, you should definetly quit it, although this is a decision we can't ...


0

Currently, I have a few interns at work as colleagues. They are pretty good, but I'd never expect them to have the same performance as a regular employee. And it would sadden me if the manager demands overtime from them. Depending on the job market and on the economy, even the concept of "voluntary" overtime is suspect*. If a company demands both stellar ...


5

Some of your colleagues will see you as this: Type 4: people that believe that new technology X is extremely important and should be integrated with all aspects of the business. Typically new graduates or interns, these people have no understanding of the flaws and limitations of X, the costs of implementing it, and have very limited understanding ...


0

Welcome to the real world, 3 types of people that you have to learn how to deal with, communicate with and work with.


6

You should do it. The best way to approach it would be to go to your boss, and say something along the lines of: I was considering taking on the project, and I think I can do it if I try very hard and put a lots of work and overtime. However since the work is way above that of an intern, I'd like to get paid for that month as a contractor would, ...


7

A real employee should certainly expect a real employee salary for doing that kind of work. So it seems like you think you ought to get something like that not for your own financial gain, but out of principle. I can sort of see that argument. However, the primary goal for an internship is not supposed to be the money, but rather to give you good industry ...


9

While asking for a raise could be received badly, that entirely makes sense here; the main problem is that your internship ends in about one month. What I suggest you is to talk to your manager / team leader and put on the table some important points, for example you can explain that you will have to work twice as much as your classmate for the same salary, ...


16

I have been working for two months (out of a total of three months) Do you have an actual assignment you have to complete and present at school, or do you just have to work in a company for 3 months? This is important. If you have to present an assignment, make sure you finish that, no matter what else is going on in the company. The project is far ...


67

Should I go ahead and ask for a raise for the last month of work? I would suggest not to do it. There is not much time left for your internship, and it would not look good on your part to ask more money when the project is critical. Also, it seems to me that your initial 1.5 months were not stressful, so looks like this extra work has been coming your way ...


4

They are interns. They do not understand how to handle themselves at work. I see it with 70-80% of my interns. The problem is you have two and they are feeding off each other's poor attitude. The tempo has been set at your workplace. Here is what I would do (and have done). Talk with each of them - I would just do both at the same time. Boom ...


24

There's too much to address here, but I'll cover some things that I think are important. First, your write-up speaks largely of your attitude and approach to managing employees. It also shows that you are very new to management or just very insecure. If your first assumption of taking on the management role is that "everyone else is terrible but me", then ...


0

A lot depends on the culture you live in. Whereas it would be unprofessional to criticise your superiors, in some cultures you would be able to include a positively phrased sentence such as: The experience was great overall. In my next job I hope to be able to take over more advanced tasks and have a slightly more autonomy. Or similar. It's not ...


-1

I will take a different angle from the other answers here. By saying you are 'not good at communicating' without elaborating on that, your boss might as well have said 'I do not like her' or more politely 'she is not a good culture fit'. Communication is a two-way concept. If your 'lack of communication skills' here means not regularly providing enough ...


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