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I am on the other side of the table, in a very similar situation (well, the two projects we are offering are NLP and ML related, but you get the idea...). Every company is different, but still let me explain how this is seen from the other side. In our case we took the initiative and explained the candidates that, while the projects are still not completely ...


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You can tell them in the most general terms, but you don't have to name the other company. It's just like when a stranger you've just struck up a conversation asks where you live. You give them a general answer, but not your exact address (even if they keep on asking for a more detailed location). Call it healthy paranoia or a healthy boundary. But if ...


1

If Company B decides to hire someone else instead of you, should they tell you who they hired and what made them hire that person?


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Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? Yes, you can tell them where & why you want to go. This shall lead to a healthy conversation about why you decided to go and maybe your present employer can come up with a new offer to retain you. Or it will also help the present employer decide actions for future cases. Is there any harm to letting ...


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Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? If he asks: sure, why not? I liked the recruiter for Company B, so I'm willing to talk to him. As it happens I told him I was going to Company A because their product, and therefore what I'd be working on, better aligned with my interests. I'd tell anyone that, even a bunch of unknown people on the ...


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Should I tell recruiter where I have decided to go? No, it's none of their business. Information is valuable, you don't give it out without a clear reason and idea of how it will benefit you. Additionally you would be giving away information that involves your employer to another company.


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I wouldn't tell them where, but telling them why may help them. If they're honest about wanting to know why so that they can address their deficiencies then that certainly can't do any harm.


12

I'm going to be blunt: this is an internship that only lasts a few months; the person hiring you doesn't expect you to accomplish anything important, doesn't care about your skills (apart from being able to perform the task you're being hired to work on) and probably wants as little interaction with you as possible. That might sound really mean. But you ...


0

The best advice to keep your current position is to carry on as if everything is normal. Sure the boss may continue to try to land you a full time position at your present company and you can play along with that, however when the time of you internship comes to an end you can leave at will.


4

Your boss could potentially find you a better position, so don't turn down a potential job because you believe it'll be worse. Potentially, the pay may be lower but have better benefits. Let your boss refer you to a potential position, and politely turn it down if it doesn't meet your expectations. As far as your notice period goes, understand what you're ...


0

I would suggest to let it go, your contract is signed so no need to worry ! Someone in the HR department will take some time, when you arrive in the company, to introduce you to all you need to know.


1

There is a good chance HR doesn't have those answers In the entities with HR departments where I have worked, HR would not have those answers. Timelines (presumably of the internship) would be the purview of your manager. Staff accounts would be part of IT. I bet that they got the email, planned to ask others about the info and then reply, and then forgot ...


1

What is the notice period for your internship? If there is a mutual understanding that you would convert to full time at the end of your internship, then that notice period length is the smallest amount of time you can give your manager while remaining professional. When you give your notice, be sure to tell them about the research group that you're ...


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Talk with your manager now, there's little to gain by waiting, but there is a lot to lose by not giving as much notice as you can. Some things you should consider: Give as much notice as possible. Give your manager a chance to keep critical work that you're working on going after you leave. If the organization knows you're leaving, other colleagues can ...


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But since it would nullify any chance of me getting any internship, I just don't disclose it during the interview and get my resume/motivation letter reviewed by a friend. You did nothing wrong. I don't know the legal system in France, but in the US, you're not supposed to disclose your invisible disabilities during the interview process. With that ...


4

How can I ask for help with proofreading thing I will put on the website that would be trivial for normal people. Should I "out" myself? Yes. You need an accommodation. You must tell potential employers about this. It might make finding an internship more difficult. But at least it will result in an internship in which you can succeed.


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If you can type sentences that are halfways understandable, it shouldn't be a problem, but I would not put it on the application. It is for selling your skills, so there should be no negative things in it. During the interview if they ask about something negative, you could mention it and the what you are doing to make it better, getting training, visiting ...


4

It really depends on your specific situation. Some of the things you could do include: a) Try to get more involved in the work you are interested in. That means talking with coworkers on what they are doing and maybe coming up with ideas, improvements, etc. that you come up with. b) Talk with your direct manager. This should probably be your first ...


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