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90

While "Have a nice day!" can be a pleasant note on which to end an email, such comments are at best superfluous in a ticket tracking system. Typically such a system should contain only critical information, and the entries should be both professional, and to the point. A similar example are posts on this site. Answers and questions are meant to allow ...


81

As I said in my comment above, focus on the behavior. You seem focused on perceived attitudes which you need to cease to do. If someone is taking on too many tasks, reassign the tasks to someone with less on their plate. It doesn't matter what the motives of the person are, nor is it right to assume what those motives may be. The only things you can ...


66

On the day of visiting the company for final selection, everybody chickened out. I made it in. Now a few days have passed and those who chickened out want me to talk to the company again and see if they would schedule another interview. I know that from a professional standpoint, this is beyond question. It also puts my neck on the line. ...


65

This carelessness about your name has gone from affecting just you to affecting your firm's business. So it has gone from just rude to entirely unacceptable. When someone gets your name wrong, you should immediately intervene, using the medium in which the error was made, saying: With respect, my name is Jane Doe, not Jill Bloggs. If the error is made ...


43

I am surprised that none of the answers has yet suggested what should be (and will be) the only solution to this mess. Forget about HR, making complaints to management, investing in dictionaries or ESL courses, none of those will solve the problem. Someone in a lead position needs to step up, unilaterally, and offer an "olive branch". This means, ...


36

If your director won't do anything, and there's nobody else to appeal to, here are the steps I would recommend: 1) If your team agrees, make it a point not to work extra time (or put in an inappropriate amount of extra effort) to make up for his deficiencies. Money talks loud, and if your director and his superiors see things slipping and ask you about it, ...


33

Yes, the joke was inappropriate. You know that because you saw that it made someone uncomfortable. It's a shame that nobody else on the team ever objected to this juvenile "humor" because now some people will say things like "we used to have such fun before we got stuck with a woman on the team." The response "how else would you put it?" is classic bully ...


28

Three possible approaches: Continue to walk on eggshells, catering to this person's unprofessional approach to working on teams. (Not a preferable option). Get this person to leave your team, either by asking them or asking their supervisor to reassign them. It doesn't sound like that will damage your project significantly. Have a private conversation in ...


28

What is the best course of action to intervene to assist the recipient of verbal abuse when my manager is the one performing the abuse? Should one wait for the conflict to play itself out, or try to defuse the situation somehow? I think you handled it correctly. Wait for the conflict/screaming to end. Then talk to your Manager privately once things ...


28

The language use here is a symptom of the real issue, that from the perspective of the non-Asian teams the two Asian teams screwed them over for their own gains. And frankly I can see their point. The other teams not only had to do "a lot of extra work" but also missed deadlines. Depending on your organisation's policies that could likely have resulted in ...


26

Escalate to the manager, and tell the manager that this individual is crossing the line into harassment and bullying. Tell the manager that you feel strongly enough about this issue that you WILL confront this individual if the manager doesn't do anything. But that you want to give the manager a chance to resolve the issue quietly and that it is your ...


25

This feels very racist. It isn't. Racism is using the concept of "race" to attribute properties to people they don't have. Like saying "all Asians are...". Grasp of a language is not something you can be racist about. Because it's a skill. The only thing that would be racist is assuming Asians are worse at English because they are Asians. They're not ...


22

Don't respond at all to this stuff. Don't acknowledge it at all. Behave like you didn't hear it. Just mildly make sure he understands your request. People engage in these kinds of inappropriate dialogs because they want reactions from people. They may think it proves to you that they have good ideas. They may also be doing it in an ineffective attempt to ...


21

Implicitly throughout your question and explicitly in your comments you've called this particular programmer childish. Is the problem that he is doing this near you? Or is the problem that he is doing this at all? Overtly you've said the first but throughout your comments it seems like it is the second. This is particularly noticeable when you say things ...


18

This behavior is entirely unacceptable. This is an issue for your landlord. Your landlord is in the business of selling shared office space that can productively be used. He is at present failing to do that. "No more Mr. Nice Guy!" I suggest you ask your site manager to speak to whomever in your company made the deal with this landlord, and get that person ...


17

You ask a question - but this question has a context. Team I made an engineering decision without consulting A to H. They bamboozled the management higher up to accept this engineering decision. The result was that team I saved some time while creating a major problem for A to H. As a result, teams A to H are majorly pissed off with team I. Team I ...


14

Is there anything worse than being taken aside for A TALK by someone who has been saving up their grimaces and objections for days or weeks? With a speech about how, without exception, all your jokes fall flat and ruin the atmosphere in the group room? I never think this is the right way to go. Instead, I encourage you to put some time into some on-the-spot ...


14

Personally, I wouldn't have approached the offending engineer about it. I would have gone straight to his supervisor to communicate the issue. This is a serious issue, and can lead to a very large lawsuit that a small firm like your self cannot afford. If she's mature, she'll know she doesn't have to put up with jokes like that, and she will lawyer up ...


14

Stop working in silos. The more you have a culture of "stay on your half of the codebase", the more likely it is that: code will go wrong because nobody asks questions it will take you a long time to find and understand code when things do go wrong you cannot explain why design decisions have been made you end up breaking something else when you 'fix' the ...


13

I was the only woman to join an engineering group of around 15, and was still the only one when we until we finally got to 80 or 90 over 2.5 years. But I never felt offended or uncomfortable during the normal banter that happens with a small dev team in close quarters. (In fact, I probably made more comments than most guys). So while I can't be much help ...


13

When your director answers with "he really wants to learn" or "I need you to help him", you need to say OK - we can do that, it would take about X amount of hours per week for Y years, and cause our project to be delayed by Z. If the director is happy with that, carry on - try not to vent your frustration on the Roger, and treat him like an intern (if that ...


13

You have no power to negotiate for them. They had a 'take it or leave it' offer and chose to 'leave it'. You cannot stick your neck out for them now, not without undermining your own standing with the company. If they want to have the interview after all, they should contact the company directly, but if they were a no-show for the earlier interview there is ...


12

I think a lot of the other answers sound too aggressive for my tastes, especially if this has been going on for a couple years and just now you stir up a big fuss about it. I would just casually notify everyone of the issue with the client and ask that everyone call you by your specific name so that there aren't any more issues like that. I'd imagine that ...


12

There is no obvious objective "right or wrong" here. Ultimately, any ticketing system aims at turning the unpredictable&unstructured human interaction to resemble a boring machine-to-machine interaction; it shows a staff as a machine, and to the staff the requests also look like a steady factory line. Your manager wants to strengthen this factory line ...


12

I've worked with a person like this once before, and she was indeed, the workplace martyr. She would almost impose her help on people, pick up way more tasks than she could handle, and then end up dropping the ball on a bunch of them, while actually putting in more work and hours than pretty much anyone else (in early, home late, no over-time pay). I find ...


11

If these are your direct reports, manage them. If someone picks up a task that someone else should be doing, simply tell the person that picked it up to let the person that should be doing it handle it. If you believe that no one on your team should be doing something, simply tell the team not to do it. If a small group of people is picking up tasks that ...


10

I would remind the sender of such an e-mail immediately after I recognize their error. You could for example write back: "I would like to kindly remind you that my name is Jane Doe, and not Jill Bloggs, as you have written. Please do your best to get my name right from now on. Spelling my name wrong has already led to misunderstandigs with a client once. ...


10

I'd just tell them that you'd really like to help but there is nothing you can do. You're new with the company yourself and have zero influence. I don't think it's even necessary to lecture them about having missed their chance. Just say that there is nothing you can do. Under the circumstances that's completely plausible. There are times when you have to ...


9

I come from the line of thinking that, when boundaries are crossed, the time to address the issue is immediately. In the case of this person asking where I'm going to be sitting, I would probably say, without getting emotional, rude, or confrontational, the following statement: I have that covered. You can find me in the flex space area if you have ...


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