92

For a 15 minute trip I would cover the costs myself. It's just not worth the hassle of sending them the receipt and waiting a month for their expenses. If you've flown in to a foreign city it would be a different story, and your transportation could be part of the trip expenses, somewhat dwarfed by your airfare. This doesn't seem the case from your question. ...


82

What answer should I give? This answer is for a software developer role (no direct reports): The simple answer here is the truth. And in this specific instance if you know the deadline isn't going to be met, delivering the truth sooner rather than later is best. Basically they want to know you are not going to hide the fact that you aren't going to ...


28

You will never get a job like that by repeating an answer you were given on a site like this. You need to learn how to answer that question in your words using your experience and examples that you have actually been part of. That said, you can find a better answer to give them next time. They key is to understand why they are asking. They believe they know ...


14

I was in a similar situation once, a few years ago, and I chose to cover the expenses myself. To me it seemed like a good investment, considering I really wanted the job. While there's probably no harm in asking, I figured: why take the chance it might offend someone, or leave them with an impression of me worse that it otherwise might be. I wouldn't want ...


10

This question, in my experience, is mainly asked to guage your travel times (and -methods), so the hiring officer can include a guesstimate of the travel expences compensation they would pay you. I wonder where you live that such a question would be illegal, as well as why it would be, but this is not relevant to OPs question. To answer the question: i ...


10

As a software developer, it's not my job to discuss that sort of problem with the client, and as a software developer there's nothing that I can do personally to fix the problem. So the only sensible course of action is to contact the program manager as soon as possible to make them aware that there is a problem, and discuss with them what can be done to ...


9

Or what do they expect to hear? They are looking to see how you think through and process this sort of question. They don't want to see you try to tell them what you think they want to hear. They don't want to hear a canned answer. It's hard, but try not to guess what they want to hear. Instead, listen to the question, think it through, and answer ...


9

I think you're overthinking this. Just ask them to book and pay for a taxi. Seems like the company is quite keen to interview you ASAP based on: they seem to be in a bit of a hurry they have asked a couple times if it could be sooner Now, two things They know that if you're good, you won't be able/willing to bend to accommodate their schedule at ...


7

Are they trying to probe for my interest in the position or are they just starting a conversation? This is simply an attempt on the recruiters part to see if you caught any red flags from the folks you interviewed with or about the company itself. how should I reply to them to increase my chance of getting the offer? I might say something along the ...


6

I am still not sure how to answer Well, what will you try to accomplish in your first few months? Do you expect to be using that time learning the existing systems? Do you intend to spend the time building relationships? Will you try and ensure that the team is following modern best-practises? Will you keep your head down and get the lay of the land? What ...


6

There's no right answer on this one. I would give them the options that are available to you on your travels. I'm sure they will match/use what's available to them (based on company policy, budget, etc.). Just be courteous in your communication. Good luck!


5

Funny that this was one of the questions, my answer to which (I think) gave me one of my previous jobs. It was not a good job, because such situations were common there. But it was relevant for that job (and should give me a hint not to take it). I mentioned what we did on one of the projects I participated: We were in an impossible situation: in a small ...


5

I work in recruiting and we haven't quite got there yet, buying cabs/Ubers for local interviews. Although I've joked, the way people ghost or no show for car troubles, getting lost, traffic/accidents that might be next... But yeah it's one thing if there is interest from another city, but locally you're responsible for showing your own reliable ...


5

Conflict of interests does not apply in the employment scenario, unfortunately. Conflict of interests usually only applies to public funds and in areas of civic responsibility such as political posts etc. Companies and businesses do not need to be transparent or publically accountable. They have all the various rights to privacy that will make your ...


5

No one can know specifically why in your case, but my guess is that they've decided it's unnecessary. Every time I have been interviewed by HR, it's been a pre-screen that has covered things like: willingness to relocate, general information about the position and company, high-level compatibility check, and basically checking any other deal-breakers to ...


4

Firstly you have my sympathies - it sounds like you were in a toxic situation and I know how soul-destroying that can be. So I absolutely understand why you wanted out ASAP but don't tip-toe around this by trying to claim you "quit", you didn't you were fired and with cause. As you say this was some time ago so you've had time to reflect on this and I'm ...


3

If flexibility is important for you, you may want to consider picking job offers from companies which advertise flexible hours or remote work. It is now widely understood that flexible working conditions constitute an advantage, so companies which are able to offer such flexibility to you usually advertise it. Interviewing with the right companies from the ...


3

According to Team Software Process (by Carnegie Mellon University), you need to communicate with the Stakeholders as soon as the team knows that the deadline cannot be met. This allows all interested parties to either replan, remove features or do something to resolve the issue (of not meeting the deadline). According to the Mythical Man Month, by ...


3

It never hurts to ask. I believe big companies have rules and they either pay for something or not. So you don't have to be somehow specially convincing, just ask politely "is it possible that you....". Also, usually, there is another person who manages your trip than the recruiter or interviewer. They may share impression about you to somebody who makes ...


3

It's not rude to ask, but it's not very professional either. The company knows you're located in the same city, and that they are reachable by public transportation. Asking for a taxi ride in this case is not common. In the end, you're trying to save your time, and suggesting the employer should pay for that will not play in your favour. Especially for a 15-...


2

put my personal projects on the resume or nah? If I had a fairly challenging technical project that I was working on in my spare time, I would definitely put it on my resume as it helps demonstrate my technical capabilities. In fact, as an interviewer, I've seen many a personal projects on the resumes of candidates, some of whom went on to get offers, as ...


2

As others have said you want to make this as easy as possible on the interviewer - throwing unnecessary obstacles in the way is never a good strategy IMO. Why not simply explain that you're going to be away on vacation and ask them what their preferred method would be? Give them some options. is it correct to ask the interviewer to call on my ...


2

Why would a company skip an HR interview? It could be one of two things. The technical interviewers felt confident enough that you were a good fit for the position and they have a good trust relationship with the HR interviewers that they want to move forward with you without needing HR's opinion. or The technical interviewers do not think you are a good ...


1

The note you got from the recruiter doesn't seem unusual. Offer a brief reply that both acknowledges the question and the update. Perhaps something like: Thank you for the update. I very much enjoyed connecting with X, Y, and Z during the interviews and am excited about the position. I'll look for your update next week and be sure to reach out to you if ...


1

If you are proud of your personal project I would absolutely include it onto your resume, especially if the project is completed. It demonstrates that you are self-motivated and am able to follow through on a goal. If it showcases other skills outside of your usual work it also highlights that you have the ability to learn and adapt to new techniques on your ...


1

A key question for you to ask in your interview is "how will you and I know I am succeeding in this job?" Then the question about your work in the first few months will have some context in your conversation.


1

If I were the one asking this question in a preliminary phone screening, I think what I'd be trying to get at is, "How familiar is this person with the company's mission and the work that we do?" In other words, how serious is this person about working with us? Did he take the time to learn about how we operate, our goals, and the challenges we face? What ...


1

So there's a deadline, and it is impossible to meet. Whatever you answer, whatever you do, one thing that won't happen is you meeting the deadline. Here's what you and your manager can do: Tell your manager as soon as possible to give them a chance minimising the damage. Missing a deadline with $10,000 financial damage is an awful lot better than missing a ...


1

I've got a question along these lines before, so it's not that uncommon. In my opinion the only correct answer is along these lines: Somebody screwed up somewhere to get here at all, now we'll make the best of it by organizing an emergency meeting and see what is possible instead of what isn't. Knowing you're going to fail and doing it anyway would be ...


1

This would be my answer, if my role was a Project Manager: If I don't think we can meet a deadline, the first thing I need to establish is what it would take in terms of manpower and other resources in order to meet the target. Then I should go to my management, and together we can perform an assessment if spending the additional resources is worthwhile in ...


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