263

My usual answer is, "I don't ever disclose my current compensation package, but I can tell you that I need a total compensation figure of $###,000.00 to leave my current role." That statement ends the conversation more often than not (which is what it is supposed to do). If they balk at my requirement, what's the point of continuing talks? Only serious ...


41

You say “I’m sorry, that’s personal information and won’t be able to provide it.” That is then the only response you provide on the subject. There’s no magic, you just politely say no. You don’t need a law to cite, you just politely say no. As long as you don’t start to waffle, it is firm. Obviously this may end up being a dealbreaker, but this gives ...


22

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) In the EU, there is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This covers the processing of personal data. Even if you agree to provide evidence of your current/previous salary, you should be careful that your GDPR rights are not violated. GDPR requires that any information to be collected must be adequate, ...


14

Your current company most likely doesn't want you to divulge what they are paying someone to a competitor. Likewise, the new company won't want you to divulge what they will paying you to a competitor, so it is quite unprofessional to expect you to tell them the same information. Apart from that, a payslip does contain personal information beyond the pure ...


10

Unlikely. When you are a student, the expectation is your studies take priority. Internships exist to teach students about the working world and give the company a bit of a labour boost while you're at it. And hey, after your studies are done and you've proven to be an asset, maybe they might help you skip the job hunting stage and let you come back to work ...


8

I have seen this happening systematically and repeatedly. Note that your mileage/kms may vary within the precise European country you are talking about, the working sector, and the fact that the company is either public or private. I get the distinct feeling they're trying to lowball me (and everyone else) You. Are. Correct. In a number of EU countries (...


7

This is perfectly normal Most companies want to cast a wide net without incurring large expenses. You cannot do that with in-person interviews as that either limits the available people to those within driving distance or requires the company to spend a lot of money on airline tickets and hotels. For most of my jobs, the interviews have been 100% remote ...


4

This is what I'd say: I understand it's your "company routine" to ask for a payslip during the interview. But please note that it's not my routine at all. Make me an offer first. Should I accept your offer, then we can talk about payslips then. That being said, you are under no obligation to even say that. You could just say. I'm sorry, but ...


3

I think the approach mentioned above, namely saying that "my NDA with my current company prevents me from revealing such proprietary information", which, quite frankly is probably true when strictly interpreted. And it has the added bonus that an NDA actually serves to benefit you for once. But I think the approach here is to offer an alternative. "My NDA ...


3

In general I agree with the prevailing NO: the HR guy told me that is "company routine" to ask the last pay slip to applicants IMHO the obvious answer is that it is your personal routine to decline any such requests, That being said, I can see one exception, though, where showing the payslip doesn't hurt and can help speed up burocracy: if you are ...


3

This may vary between different cultures but most probably and extremely likely: NO, you are a student in their eyes and supposed to prioritize your studies. Short employments are expected. It would probably look good to have one of those continued employments from internship because that tells to them that you have shown your capabilities during the ...


4

Interviewer: So are you familiar with git, things like branching, merging, rebasing...? "Yes, I have been using git since my first semester of university. Whenever I'm in a group project, I'm usually the one merging all the pull requests into the master branch. Just take a look at my repositories on github." The interviewer probably won't take a deep ...


2

How do you avoid getting angry or upset because you perceived in your mind (and the impression is very strong) they do not want to hire you and you are wasting your time by remaining there? Excellent question! It contains the seeds of its answer. It doesn't help that job interviews are very stressful situations. Let's break this down by category: ...


2

Others have given good answers, but the final way to answer this (after simply saying no) is to say that at the end of the day the place you're applying to is technically a competitor. Letting them know how your current company compensates its employees is highly valuable knowledge and giving it up is unethical. Telling them this will hopefully make them ...


2

I work in the Industry for about 20 Years, in Germany. Just recently I also noticed more and more phone-interviews. So that seems to get more common nowadays. That said, If there was real interest it was always followed up by an in-person interview. So from my perspective, deciding on an phone interview sounds unusual. This may vary with the kind of job ...


2

From what you wrote, this does not sound like you where doing something horribly wrong. But even if an interview goes well, you don´t always get the job. There may be someone more skilled, cheaper or more the bosses son they ´ll go for. There are some things to think about, though. The main thing, I think is: Ask questions yourself. A good interview is not ...


1

I'd like to provide another angle for this question as both I and people I know have been asked to provide their a payslip from a current or previous employer for the purposes of verifying current / previous employment. (country: Netherlands) In these cases it was perfectly fine to black out any salary information and/or amounts as long as it remained clear ...


1

Negotiate to furnish payslips after joining the company to avoid negotiation based on it. Many companies (at least in my country) ask for payslips from previous employers for "verification purposes". This is done to avoid candidates who fake their current pay and negotiate for a higher pay. In such cases, you don't need to furnish the payslips while ...


1

Anger is rarely the best resonse to anything. As others have pointed out, you may need to get some professional help, or at least anger-management classes. If you meant it less literally though, perhaps you might take this into consideration? I'm a senior freelance software-engineer (enterprise architect) for very large banks, and I interview a lot of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible