The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
12

That sounds like a standard noncommittal reply and/or actually being friendly. With recruiters, you never know which. You have not signed anything, so you do not want to fixate on that particular job yet. Keep looking, and if something comes up, you ask the recruiter again if anything has developed so far, because now that you have two leads, you need to ...


8

I would say a month is normal. If you are in contact with the recruiter, this is a good sign, because if they didn't want to hire you, it would be easier for them to tell you or ghost you, and not waste valuable hours on someone they don't want to hire. The hold up could be due to a variety reasons. HR might be too busy to prepare the contracts. Managers ...


7

In my experience the right way to go about it is to ask the candidate if they can provide additional references if you need them. Contacting non-listed references is, in my opinion, a violation of privacy (I don't mean this in a legal way, it's perfectly legal). If you need more references to make a decision, you contact a candidate and ask them to provide ...


6

First, I find this practice incredibly distasteful and unprofessional. All job applications should be submitted in confidence. As a hiring manager, you (we) don't know if the candidate is leaving a job quietly, or not. And by contacting "backdoor references" or "non-listed references" you could jeopardize their situation even more. This puts the candidate ...


6

Is there anything I can do? Yes. Wait a few more days to see if you hear anything, and if not follow up next week. As I mentioned in a comment, you didn't actually ask the recruiter a question, you just said thanks for their time. So why are you expecting an answer? If you wanted to know next steps and timelines, you should have asked the question in ...


5

At what point should I stop thinking about this role and just assume that an offer won't be coming? In other words, what's a normal amount of time to wait? Immediately after you've finished the interview. You list a whole bunch of guesses as to what this might mean about the internal properties of the company. None of that stuff is your problem, it's ...


5

You should expect to write code. Preferably, work on personal projects consistently in the weeks leading up to your interview. This will train your brain to be in JavaScript mode so you don't fumble JavaScript's syntax while trying to implement an algorithm they've asked you to write. Search the web for "JavaScript exercises" or "JavaScript interview ...


4

I wanted to put this as a comment but i don't have enough rep. Anyway here is a questionnaire for job interviews with basic/common questions of javascript. Although the focus is for front end, the questionnaire has many of the basics like these questions: Basic JS Knowlegment Explain event delegation. Explain how this works in JavaScript. What ...


4

This seems odd. They have a post to fill, perhaps due to someone leaving and this loses any opportunity for a "handover". If you are currently employed and have to give notice then that will extend the possible start date as well. How you handle this is down to you, you could be prepared to stay in your current role. Or you could say to the recruiter that ...


3

Put it simply the reasons are there are a lot of lessons that don't align with my interest... and because i want to be a web/software engineer. An engineering education is much more about understanding what code you should not write, than it is about learning to write code that "works" in the near term. If you just want to build things, that's what your ...


3

I've held a couple of interviews with prospective employees supposed to work with js, ng, node & pgsql and therefore put a little questionnaire together to rate the candidates. The first part doesn't even consist of any programming but rather general IT-questions to see if they have even the most basic understandings of computers and networks: 1.1 ...


2

Today is friday, you posted your question 4 hours ago so I assume you sent this email yesterday, which was thursday (so 2 days after the interview), it is pretty common that HR need / take more than 2 days to decide if they actually want to hire or not someone. Taking that into account, to me her answer just means be more patient, we will get back to you. ...


2

Is contacting references like in this situation allowed and/or ethical? Unless a candidate has explicitly indicated that they did not want certain organizations/individuals contacted then this is OK. Considering that they are using publicly available information to contact these people ( i.e. social media ) there is nothing unethical about this practice. ...


1

You are correct in surmising that you should wait a fair bit longer before sending a second email. One email is probably fine to show that you are keen but I don't think you can justify sending more than one in the space of a week. If you have an urgent reason to contact them (e.g. because you have an offer from another company) then it would be reasonable ...


1

Is contacting references like this situation allowed and/or ethical? Yes, it's allowed. IMHO, it's perfectly ethical to talk to anyone who might know about your abilities before offering you a job,, other than someone at your current employer. My boss used to call this "back door references" and it was routine. I'd hope my LinkedIn/social media contacts ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible