New answers tagged

0

It's okay to decline to answer an interview question, but it most likely gives the interviewer a negative impression. You did the right thing be honest with the interviewer that you don't have an answer instead of giving an answer to a different question or making up an answer. Unfortunately, this is pretty rare and it would take a very mature and practiced ...


-1

TLDR: Don't convey a commitment of anything longer than five years. Because anything longer than that is just crazy talk. If I had interviewed someone that said that they would be willing to commit for 10+ years, I would assume they were just trying to play up to me. She recommended to show that I'm interested in being dedicated and staying with the same ...


8

This is one of those questions you need to be very careful answering in case you fall into traps: revealing insanely personal things the interviewer doesn't want to know, or things most people would dislike about you that you don't share with your friends, or things they are not allowed to consider in hiring like your religion, sexuality, and so on. If you'...


0

It doesn't seem unusual to me that tuition reimbursement isn't mentioned in an offer letter. At this point in my career, I've probably seen around a dozen offer letters (turned at least a couple down). Salary is always named. Vacation - if it is outside the normal allotment - will be listed in the letter. However, in my recollection, not a single offer ...


0

Often such a benefit may only become available once the candidate passes their probation period. It may also be subject to a certain period of continued employment during and after completion of studies done under such a benefit. Your best course of action would be to inquire about such a benefit with your boss or HR department. From there you should know ...


4

With the burn as bad as you say, it may leave a permanent scar, which you'll have to learn to deal with, but that doesn't have to be during an interview right now. During an interview, you're likely to be self-conscious and nervous as it is, you don't need to add to it. This is about your comfort level more than it is about the interviewer's comfort level. ...


-2

Sales, ok unless you really want to stay in sales, otherwise if you want the technical side, apply for other job, you don't have to accept that job offer.


2

Just tell the recruiter what you just described to us here. The reasons you stated for moving from A to B and the reasons for being interesting leaving company B sound perfectly reasonable. People move around in the tech industry. Don't make something up that's sure to confuse matters for you further down the interviewing process with Google.


0

Wearing gloves will only attract more attention to your hands. As an interviewer, I wouldn't bring up your scar if I saw one, but I would be interested why you are wearing gloves in the middle of summer. A burn is not the kind of sign that makes people assume the worst, like traces of injection needles or a blue eye, which you'd better explain. Most will ...


4

I agree with all the posts who say you don't need to disguise or explain your scars. But interviewers might still ask what happened. They are human, and humans can be thoughtless. So I suggest you prepare a small script if someone makes a comment. That way, you won't be flustered, or go on a rant... whatever you do when you're nervous. Prepare a short ...


8

Don't let your scars define you, either to yourself or to others. It seems fairly evident that you're (quite understandably) still suffering anxiety about your scars, and this (and the surrounding situations) is something that will take some time to deal with. I'm not advocating that you should ignore your scars and the issues surrounding them, but you ...


0

This probably depends on countries (and their culture) but there are fundamental differences between scars (or other bodily deformations) coming from an accident (or medical effects) and the ones self-inflicted (including tattoos). The second ones are much more complicated during a job interview. In the first category, which people understand to be ...


0

The initial interview is not the right time unless you are specifically asked a question about that., Once you start it's too late if they're not going to accommodate you, asking earlier also means the desk should be there day 1. The right time to ask is at the offer stage, ideally if they contact you to say they will be making an offer you could raise it ...


0

If you are still interested or want clarity about the situation, ask. Weigh your need to get an update versus the likely degree of how busy you counterpart is and how much you want to disturb him. If you don't mind waiting a couple of days for an answer, use an asynchronous way of communication like mail, text message or even a letter if that is still a ...


-2

I would get in touch with the head of the company who approached you and say briefly, "Look, you didn't get in touch - I guess things have changed your end. Thanks for considering my application, too bad it didn't work out" and forget about it. For whatever reason, this job has evaporated :)


0

Try to reschedule your interview out of loyalty to your current boss, but only when this is possible. If it's not convenient for the recruiter/new company at all, I would still go to the interview instead of your meeting. You're exploring new jobs for a reason. Good luck!


-1

Don't waste any more of your time. The head was partly fishing for cv's to check out the quality of the pond. That post has most likely been filled...


3

i promptly submitted my application and I got a positive response from him directly stating he will call me for an interview soon and he has a particular job role in mind for me. Now it has been 2 months and I have not heard from him - should I approach him again ? Yes, you should. If you feel he may be busy, prefer an asynchronous medium such as email ...


9

Many a times, companies do not list all the benefits as part of the offer letter, but as separate policy documents which they share separately (sometimes along with the offer letter, sometimes after you sign the offer letter but before you join, sometimes at the time of your joining). Depending on the size of the company, there could be separate policies ...


7

Just be honest about it. You can say your current job at company B was an excellent opportunity, as it offered you the opportunity to live abroad. You can also say that you're considering Google (despite the great parts of the job at B, including the international exposure), because it's your dream company (or a company you really admire) and you wouldn't ...


9

It would be fine to request a different time or day for the interview, just do your best to be flexible with rescheduling. Recruiters understand that last-minute things come up. Whether it's taking a kid to a doctor's appointment or an important meeting, there are all sorts of valid reasons to reschedule an interview. Call the recruiter as soon as you can (...


6

Either Reschedule your meeting or Reschedule your interview It is not rocket science.


12

This is not something that belongs in a resume at all. When you list your jobs in the traditional reverse-chronological order, it will be obvious that you last worked 7 years ago. Just leave it at that. In your cover letter and in your interview conversations, just be honest. You didn't need to work, so you chose not to. Now things have changed and you do ...


12

People take time off of work. It isn't the most common thing, but it happens. If you'd like to address it on your resume, I would list the time as a self-imposed sabbatical. It may be best to address this in a cover letter. You might try something like: "My financial situation has made it so that I haven't had to have a regular paycheck for the last seven ...


14

First off, I am sorry about your experience which you described. I am big believer in that everyone should be able to go home alive, with all their digits, and a "fist-full of money" at the end of each shift. My condolences to your friend. As someone who has large visible scars on my right hand and left arm, I wouldn't cover it. The only things I take care ...


1

At @GreySage's suggestion, let me point out here in less fleeting form that time worked at a company is usually a shortcut for experience with a certain technology. You might consider, if the conversation turns to something that the interviewer is very intent on, saying something like 'I only worked with --- for ?a few months ?a year while in this job, and ...


-6

Personally, I'd consider covering it, given the history behind the scar. It'd be trivial for them to look at the scar, hear the story behind it, then instantly decide that it's evidence that you lack the safety consciousness that a professional should have, and instantly decide not to hire you to protect the company from any liability that might arise from ...


114

You don't need to cover or explain your scars if you don't want to. Employers don't have any need to know where your scars came from, regardless of whether you got them on the job or not. That is completely personal to you and whether you want to share that information. Even if you get the job, you don't ever need to share that information if you don't want ...


22

Unless you are interviewing for a position where a specific physical appearance is necessary there is no need to hide or explain anything about any scars on your body. Furthermore, no interviewer should be asking questions about scars...especially if it has nothing to do with the position you are applying to.


9

Should I ware gloves or something? If not, how can I explain it when I'm on an interview? You could wear gloves... but I think that will make it more evident, and interviewers could wonder why you have gloves during an interview. Let's assume you don't wear gloves. In that case, there is a chance interviewers won't even ask and mind their own business. ...


5

After a good response like @mxyzplk suggests, you could easily turn around and ask them the same question - "if I get this job, can I keep it for 10-20 years?" It's about as ridiculous as the original. Neither of you can really make that commitment in advance, things both inside & outside the relationship can change. Clarification: I don’t actually ...


0

You can honestly say your period of employment with company X is around three years. That is measured from the time that you commenced employment, to the time that you ceased employment. The amount of leave you took during that period is between you and company X and, if you left them on good terms, that is all you need to say to recruiters or ...


6

Ask for feedback especially when you feel you have not done well [1] It never hurts to ask for a feedback. Generally speaking, you should almost always seek feedback after an interview. It puts you in a good light by showing your eagerness to improve and learn. Remember, not to be boastful if you feel you have done well. You have nothing to lost. In fact ...


40

Keep in mind that in most companies you may "be gone as soon as it suits" them as well, too. I know from personal experience that this is hard to do, but: Don't feel attached/loyal to your company, be loyal to your job and profession. Since noone else out there is looking after what's best for you, you're the only one who can look out for your best interests....


17

She recommended to show that I'm interested in being dedicated and staying with the same company for 10-20 years. Imagine that you get an offer from the company, accept it, start working there and discover that none of the negative reviews you've read are true - the environment is great, you like the job, the compensation, the people. Would you still be as ...


147

"Great! As long as I'm fairly compensated and challenged to learn and grow, I don't see any reason to change jobs!" Obviously you are pretty sure you won't be fairly compensated and challenged to learn and grow for long, but that's on them. This is true and stated very positively, so threads the line between lying ("Of course, it's my life goal to die in ...


1

I am confused. You talk like you quit but it doesn't sound like a quit. I think you would have noticed the signs of having quit: below. If you didn't explicitly quit and rejoin, then you worked there ~4 years. This was not a fool's errand on their part. For one thing, you were available to them for any emergencies that might've come up, since you were ...


0

"To be completely, technically accurate, I did take some leave back in {year}, which lasted more than 6 months. I do not anticipate having to take leave again, and have been focusing on such achievements and skill sets since then." >>>> this should let you sleep at night and get a bland "Glad to hear it" from your interviewer. You might want to skip over ...


1

I wonder if saying "worked" is what bothers you and doesn't go well with you conscience? In which case would it help you to say "I was part of Company X for 3 years" instead of "I worked at/for Company X for 3 years"? That way, you are not lying or misleading or hiding anything. Technically you are correct in stating this as it is true.


2

I wouldn't advertise your age uninvited. Whether on a resume, a company profile, or elsewhere, adding your age is either going to be taken as cavalier or a reason to doubt your ability. Let your experience and reputation speak for itself. So long as you get the job done well and are respectful and collaborative with those around you, I don't think many ...


4

No. In the US in particular, it's illegal to ask the question. It's irrelevant to the job. You can either do the work, or not. The same could be asked of the 60 year old man who wonders "Should I tell them my age?" Because, after all, the stereotype is that older people can't keep up in the tech world, right? Prove you can do the work and no ...


11

Why would anyone care what your age was at work? They should be more concerned with your skill level relevant to the job. If you're under the impression that you will be judged unfairly if you tell them your age, then don't. If it's a concern, just don't talk about it. If someone else brings it up, tell them (it shouldn't be a secret) and then if they ...


0

I'm going to go against the trend here and say no, don't do that. Despite your intentions for the better, it almost certainly will come off as you trying to impress after the interview is over to score a few more brownie points. That isn't necessarily a particularly good impression - it comes across as a bit desperate. If you really want to do this, then I'...


0

As it a habit I should stop doing or is it okay? There is nothing wrong with helping people and it is actually admirable that you would go out of your way to try to help people as much as possible. In this case ( job interviews ) reaching out after the the interview unsolicited to help the interviewer could be seen as strange or desperate. It's up to you ...


2

Demonstrating your usefulness by giving (well-founded) advice on issues that the company is facing is generally a good strategy. However, contacting the CEO about it without being prompted to might come across as unprofessional, primarily because you are following up on a conversation the day after it happened with something that is (or could be percieved as)...


3

Is it a habit I should stop doing or is it okay? This can be a very good thing but it has to be done very "delicately". This can go two ways: it's either perceived as "Wow, the person really knows their stuff and it would be great to have them on the team" or as "What an arrogant know-it-all". In order to do this well, you need to Really know this ...


1

Is it a habit I should stop doing or is it okay? It depends. While it causes no harm. You are sending someone something which could be useful for them. Heck, it may even lead up to you scoring the job. On the other hand, it may cause some to think you are desperate for the job. You may also end up spending time which may not yield immediate benefits for ...


0

Is it a habit I should stop doing or is it okay? It is not bad. It is just very unusual. I assume you ae not a charity fund or something, considering that you try to get a job. Therefore, you should tell the respective company(ies) that you can help them fix their problems. In exchange, you may ask for: regular employment (that is why you are / were there,...


15

If you're looking to help and are confident your answers demonstrate your capabilities, it's a fine thing to do. You should be careful to phrase your note as a genuine offer of help and not an opportunity to show off more outside of the interview. I would have a positive reaction to someone reaching out after an interview with a genuine idea for how to ...


5

You are overthinking this. Technically you were employed for the entire duration of N years with the company. If you specify it any other way, this will create a confusion for every other person who comes across it, and you can potentially face issues (longer durations) in your background checks if being done by third party. Recruiters and other ...


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