New answers tagged

10

How do I respectfully communicate I'd only like to be considered for the higher role? If you are interviewing through a recruiter, you make it known to the recruiter that you are very interested in the company, but that you would only consider accepting a Director role, and aren't interested in a Lead role. The recruiter would be expected to convey your ...


0

You don’t. Note the schools you’ve attended and the year you’ve ended you’re attendance. Saying you’ve attended Such and such university and was majoring in such and such is not a lie. There’s no need to express the conclusion if not asked especially with the successful career you’ve maintained despite of. P.s. More power to you!! I’ve met/worked with ...


4

Lying is rarely the best option. (Obv.) Saying nothing, or as little as possible, is easier. The problem here is that a colleague might be interested in cars, or just want to make conversation and start asking ("what was wrong? did you try this? what car do you have?"). If they ask, don't add more lies (avoid, for example, saying that you had a flat, or ...


9

I usually would recommend taking a PTO day if you're interviewing, going over a lunch break, or going during the day and letting your manager know in advance that you need to be out for X hours - If you need an excuse for why, I don't necessarily think there's much harm in saying something like a dentist appointment or needing to be there for the cable guy ...


33

Next time this happens, I would let your manager know beforehand. It's not a good idea to not show up for work and then suddenly have an excuse as you arrive for work. That will cause suspicion. If you contact your manager and explain that you're going to be late for work due to "personal obligations", that would be a good reason. Saying "personal ...


1

Perhaps your best option is to not actually answer the question if answered. Most people will jump to the conclusion that you were actually interviewing, as you were. So many may not even ask. But if they do ask, a simple "Does it matter?" and then changing the subject could be a reasonable answer. Unfortunately, the way interviews are set up, and the ...


16

why can't they provide me with a position in [team A]? Maybe they don't have any (relevant) open positions right now. just let me skip the 2 interviews for the position at division B Consider this from the other side - would you ever want somebody coming into your team who you hadn't interviewed? If somebody tried to do that to my team, my boss would ...


2

Does any one have any experience with a similar situation I have a disability that actually can affect my performance as an employee, and carries a lot of associated prejudice. It's fortunate it's easy to conceal, and I completely understand your desire not to disclose it for interview process. If the company policy explicitly states you have to declare ...


0

My question is not when I should disclose the disability, I've already decided that I won't do so until after I'm hired. My question is if refusing to do so will have implications regarding potential security incidents. It likely will have implications. If you are going to wait until you are hired, then you should at the very least bring up your device ...


8

In the US, the ADA essentially states that employers must make reasonable accommodations for disabilities. This extends to interviewing. However, some people choose to not disclose disabilities because they are afraid of discrimination even though such discrimination would be illegal. That said, you also don't want to end up in a position where not ...


3

This could also discourage candidates with "invisible disabilities" -- nothing that would interfere with the job if they can work in a normal chair, but a bad knee could be a sports problem, and many people have problems with their back, knees, and hips as they age. I am picturing these "lounge chairs" as being lower to the ground and softer than normal ...


1

As a makeshift measure (that is to say, not ideal and temporary) you can increase the level of formality by adding ritual to the interviews: ensure the room is clean and cleared in advance, then put a notice on the door ("claimed for X" or similar) that also means no radio playing if the room is even a little dark go to IKEA and buy standing and/or desk ...


2

A relatively small expenditure should allow and adequate level of venue presentation. Get HR to buy a presentable desk and chairs that can be placed in required rooms when needed. The table or desk could be collapsible without appearing so and without looking cheap and shoddy. Chairs could be suitable standard chairs.


1

Internal job transfers are just like external ones with additional risk for the employee. The risk is that your current manager may be aware of the attempt much earlier in the process. Other than the risk stated above; the processes, procedures, budget changes, and seemingly randomness of the final decision is exactly the same. I have been denied an ...


0

I don't think that internal transfers are necessarily more complex but you are more likely to get messed around like this. When people recruit externally, they generally have already got definite approval for the additional cost, and a firm idea of what they want. Thanks to the approval process, they probably needed this additional person months ago and ...


0

Team #1: Could take along while but it does not hurt to mail to inform about the status so you can let the manager know you are still interested. Team #2: Work on the feedback you got. But I think this is not an option for now Team #3: Maybe you can find out if they did have interviews with others? It is not unrealistic that they have not been planned yet. ...


2

This really depends a bit on: the concrete layout and what you understand about an intimate room the type of interview you want to conduct the company culture 1) How intimate is it, really? If people need to share a couch with the interviewer, that will feel way too intimate for many people and might make them close up or feel insecure. It might indeed ...


0

I mostly agree with @Ed Heal, you should absolutely avoid doing interviews in break rooms. Being interviewed in a break room would give me the impression of a workplace that is both seriously overcrowded and assigning a very low priority to interviews - both are red flags, at least for me. I once worked for a company that had pretty much the same problem, ...


8

I recommend getting one or two employees who the candidate is not directly interviewing with but are also responsible to show the candidate the general area next to the company and the lunch spots in the area then bring them to one of the places you would recommend as this is also a setting point of the company. Encourage your employee(s) to allow the ...


5

I think you’re overthinking this. Personally I would much prefer to hold an interview in a relaxed informal space with sofas. This would help break through the “Job Interview” discomfort, and give you a far better idea of who you’re meeting than sitting stiffly around a table in a meeting room and asking questions like “What is your greatest weakness”.


15

Assuming your team is large enough, lunch should be with team members that aren't involved in the interviewing process (and it will be great if this will be people at the same level you are considering this candidate for). This will be an opportunity for the candidate to learn more about what working at your firm is like, and to be told things, and ask ...


11

I work at a very large company that is well known in the industry. The problem is that sometimes we don't have enough conference rooms in the facility These two statements don't play well together. It sounds like there's a bigger problem to solve here: either your company does not have sufficient facilities for its needs, or your co-workers are ...


4

Depends on the position. But if you are interested in them and keeping them for so long then I think it is in your interest to treat them to lunch and get to know them better. Lunch can reveal a lot about someone from their manners to how they treat the wait staff. You could have a great candidate on paper but if you can’t stand eating lunch with them, ...


35

You could take them out or bring food in, whichever works best for your setup. But whatever you choose to do, let them know ahead of time, and ask if they have any food preferences or allergies. That way you won't provide a pepperoni pizza to someone who only eats Kosher, or a sub sandwich to someone who is gluten intolerant. That also lets them know ...


1

From on Andrew Lacivita's video, from around the 9:00 mark, he states: Do not send a group thank you email, it does nothing to connect you to the individuals themselves, it will make them feel like one of many. He then goes on to suggesting individual letters where the beginning (thank you) and end (excited for the opportunity, look forward to hearing ...


3

You may be overthinking this. If the position you are looking at is in your acceptable salary level, then "I don't believe my current company is paying me what I'm worth" is a perfectly acceptable reason for switching. If you were to just say that you wanted more money (and it doesn't really matter what you want the money for) they might fear that you ...


7

As with any interview question, you need to phrase your response in terms that benefit the company or at least are reasonable to it. The company doesn't care if you want to bring your wife over. The company does care if employees are more likely to remain loyal. I'd suggest taking more of the angle of why you're worth it while being nice about your ...


3

Developer here. Since I've actually talked to executives a fair amount of times, and my step-mom worked for CEOs of an F500 corporation, and I've visited their offices, I think I can help. I would love recommendations (literature welcome!) on business etiquette, attire, small talk, how to handle a potential conversation about a promotion, how to present ...


0

Ask for more detailed job specs in writing before you waste your time with an interview. If they won't commit in writing, I assume they are not serious. If you don't get more detailed job specs in writing, that could also mean the recruiter (even if he is a valid recruiter with an actual job opening) may not know what he's doing, and the importance of ...


1

Having dealt with exactly the same issue but UK based, here's how I tackled it: Ask directly for a job specification (spec) or description. That document will generally be what the recruiter is summising in their emails and messages. Asking for that document is not rude. "Sorry there's no spec available". Then there's no job. Would you want to work for a ...


5

The other answers give good advice on how to present the 2 weeks at this company in future interviews. I won't repeat what they say. Instead let's go to the general lesson from this: you weren't cheated, what actually happened was you failed to negotiate the deal you wanted. Let's look at the known facts here I was told that they wouldn't budge on the ...


3

If you are concerned about such things, how about having a couple folding chairs and a (maybe also folding) table that you can take into any room for the interview time? Upright postures and a table between you (also for papers/ coffee if any needed during interview) would add some sense of a work environment vs leisure.


3

Does a potential IPO indicate that the corporation's financials need some help? Not really. An IPO would be regulated by the market regulator's stringent condition. If anything, it is a sign that the company is in good financial health at the moment, as otherwise, why would a public investor invest money in it. Do companies typically fire large numbers ...


2

First off, no, a company going public is not a sign of bad financials. Quite the opposite, a company typically only goes public when things are going really well and they think they have good prospects for growing even further. No one in the public is going to buy their stock if the outlook for the company isn't good. If they are serious about going IPO, it ...


0

As your question is "how to prepare for an online programming exam", I'm going to assume you want to prepare for an exam that you are being asked to take. Therefore, any discussion regarding if these exams are indicators of programmer skill, or if they are useful for hiring purposes, etc., is irrelevant. As as you've already taken a few, and have not done ...


2

The more you learn about how senior leaders think, the more you learn the concepts and language that connect most effectively with them. This will need to be a bit of a crash course, since you only have a week, but you can learn a bit. Find some of the stuff out there on the 'Net on management (Manager Tools is my favorite; you could also read some articles ...


29

There is a difference between intimate and casual. It sounds like what you have are too many casual spaces. My current employer has combinations of "huddle" and "team" rooms. I would never conduct an interview in a "huddle" room, which is often some chairs and maybe a table, and none of the furniture is "office furniture". The "team" rooms are small ...


3

The other answer is great, but my comments were too long for a comment. The first thing to understand is that an EVP / SVP has the same goals any 2nd or 3rd line and above manager has -- the effective and profitable operation of the business. The higher up the ladder the more abstract the objectives become, but the goal is generally the same -- the ...


111

facilities staff is stretched too thin Does your company not have a room booking solution? If so, just print out a piece of paper with text "Room blocked from time X to Y on date Z for interviews". And paste it outside a decent meeting room in advance. When you need the room, just ask the people to vacate. I work at a very large company that is well ...


1

First things first, if it weren't for ADD/ADHD and people at various positions on the Autism spectrum, there'd be a lot fewer software engineers. Asperger's is "on the spectrum" and I've worked with a significant number of developers with Asperger's, as well as many with ADD/ADHD. I'm not convinced that the whole "flow state" thing, along with "leave me ...


244

I would ensure that a meeting room is available for these interviews. Perhaps bump people out of meeting rooms as they could rearrange/or use the lounge. I would do this also because an interviewee is also deciding if they want to work for you. It looks very unprofessional to have a meeting in essentially a break room.


3

Generally, I would ask recruiters that contact me in this manner for a job description. They should be able to provide that, without giving away specific details like the name of the company. Failing that, they should, at the very least, be able to provide some basic information about the position that would allow you to determine if it obviously a non-...


0

It could be a number of reasons, not all of which are red flags. I've encountered three distinct groups of situations. The best case is that the website and contact email could be handled by a third party, who defers all questions to the actual company. The person you emailed doesn't know the answer, but they instead schedule time with you to discuss ...


21

I have been in a similar situation quite a few years ago. I lasted 4 months with company X before I reached tipping point and called short on my probation. A few years later I was looking to switch jobs again (not out of choice this time) and the recruitment agent that was contracted by company Y insisted that my 4 month tenure with X looked bad on my CV ...


225

It's only been 2 weeks... I'd argue that you don't have to mention this job at all. When asked why you're job searching you can explain why you left your previous position. If for any reason you can't omit a job from your work history no matter how short (locale, the type of job you're applying for, etc.), you can be honest without going into details: I'm ...


9

While talking to the person would be recommended, my guess would be a room with very little background noise, (both equipment and chatter) and try to keep the number of people in the room to, say, five or less. If it's a long interview, I'd suggest scheduling a short break after every hour or so. (A good idea in general, honestly.) The lack of background ...


-8

As someone on the autism spectrum, you don't give him the safespace. If he can't put up without a interview safespace, he probably can't put up without a safe workspace. What does that mean? Not sure, but I imagine it is someone who criticizes his work, or gives suggestions/opinions. On top of probably having a very certain kind of setup that your regular ...


12

How does one prepare for this? Perhaps the most important thing is to keep calm and be yourself and don't pretend/boast. I also suggest you ask your boss if there is anything you should prepare or do before the trip and meeting. Regarding attire, you should most definitely suit up, specially when going to important meetings like this. Now, I must say a ...


3

Talking to the hiring manager is generally not a problem, just talk/mail the HR that you have certain questions and would like to talk to the hiring manager before making a decision. This should help alleviate some concerns around the work practices etc. However, Your request to visit the workplace may not be entertained at many companies (Needs security ...


3

If you have the option of moving closer to work, do it. Commute time have a huge effect on happiness. I have about the same commuting time as you and I hate it. I have spent so much time commuting in my life. Moving to within 15 minutes of my office next week. This gives me 15 more hours of life per week. Never again will I live far from work.


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