New answers tagged

1

There is nothing wrong with asking about these things and no company you want to work for will see them as a bad sign. Actually, these are pretty standard things to talk about in an interview. Companies that think of those questions as a red flag are the ones you should avoid.


1

At a startup this early stage, the only thing that matters is the individuals you'll be working with. Focus only on them, and if you feel you'll work well together. Things like organisational structure and culture don't really exist yet. To the tiny extent they do, you'll have an instant and ongoing huge influence on them anyway when you join. For example,...


0

You are looking for big company processes and structures in a place that clearly is too small to have them. I work in a bigger company than the one you are describing and most of their processes are make it up as we go and violated on a daily basis. I had a job recently at one of the largest global IT companies and boy did they have processes. They had ...


1

You're handling this exactly right, by persevering in getting your issues addressed. Here's one suggestion. There's stuff you don't like about your present job. Describe some of that stuff, in general terms, and ask whether this other company has similar problems and how they might cope with them. Be vague about which company you're describing. For ...


4

The best strategy when you want to showcase yourself in a professional light is to have a clean piece that can be analysed. Things that you did for yourself often don't make the grade, precisely for the reasons you think, sometimes a bit of laziness, humour or bias thats not particularly PC is all it takes to get you filtered out of a list. And also because ...


0

I frequently get rejected if this is part of the process. I also find it much more difficult to find a connection here. They seem much more critical of me. Hiring managers and your peers evaluate candidates in different ways. Manager interviews tend to be more high level (further from the code) than your peers. They focus more on your soft skills (e.g. how ...


4

Based on your question and the information provided, get feedback from someone who's willing to be brutally honest with you. This feedback should include: How knowledgeable you are in your field. Your personality, ability to hold conversation, how interesting you are as a person. Your appearance, hygiene, etc. In some fields this doesn't matter, most people ...


6

Given the information you provided, I'd definitely apply for the job. If you think you were a good fit for the department 2 years ago, you probably still are. If so, should I make reference to the fact they interviewed me before? The company has experienced a lot of growth in this time & the manager likely won't remember me as it was just under 2 ...


4

Okay, this isn't going to be an answer to the question you're directly asking; this is going to address the core issue here: You need to learn to fail. I'm not sure whether you're willing to take any of this on board, but this isn't an issue of "What do I tell the recruiter?" It's an issue of needing to learn how to fail and how to fail in a positive way - ...


0

What you have written here could easily be reworked into an answer that doesn't come off as being a bragger and also someone who is isn't devious. You can get away with some bragging if you follow up with a minor negative. So sure say you rarely get negative feedback because you were poorly raised as a people pleaser by your parents. That statement is ...


8

I couldn't come up with a good answer for the question because such an outcome would indicate a massive failure on my part. I think I would quit a job where I got any since that would mean I screwed up badly This is exactly why they ask the question. To filter out people who won't take negative feedback well or use it constructively (even if harsh). ...


1

The interview question you're asking about is a behavioral question. The ultimate goal of such questions is to assess whether you are an authentic and reasonable person to work with. These questions can be difficult, but your answer has to be true and from your own work experience. Your answer might not be an impressive answer or you might draw a blank but ...


7

Use every opportunity to show your strength. They are not really bothered about whether you actually faced that scenario or not, they want to know your mindset on how you will handle when that scenario happens. If a day comes when you have to face / handle that scenario - what would be your mindset, thought process, strategy and mental strength to counter / ...


0

1) An offer is not an offer until it's in writing and signed by the company. As such, what you responded to and what they needed your approval on was not an offer, it was an offer of an offer. You still do not have the offer. 2) They pressured you to give them your acceptance of their offer of an offer within a short time window, because they wanted to ...


3

I now got invited to the last rounds by two other companies offering the same or better conditions I'd continue on with these offers as if the other company's offer never occurred. Until you get a written offer and a signature could you consider it valid. and I'm not sure whether the process at the company described above was a red flag or not. It's ...


3

A "promise" of a contract is not a contract. If you have not signed anything, you are not bound by any contract. You only hurried to provide the verbal confirmation, because of the immediate joining date they provided. As I was in several other recruitment processes I asked for a few days to make up my mind. They told me they needed my decision by Friday ...


0

I disagree with the accepted answer. Ask for recommendation from the employer who dismissed you. Skilled people are dismissed due to personal reasons, character conflicts with the manager or other "internal" company policies. Injustice is a part of corporate life. They might have lack of moral, and power to apply injustice, just took you down because you ...


5

have a hunch that they already know that they want to reject me and that they are waiting a few days to give me the message in order to give the impression that they thought long and hard about it and to avoid showing disrespect for a fairly long and intensive interview process. Or maybe, just maybe they have a couple of candidates they like and need a few ...


6

Don't assume all that Hiring is a badly organized part of most businesses. They literally could have forgotten to hold the meeting to decide on the candidate to hire. I've had interviewers forget they scheduled something with me. My friend worked at a company where HR hired the same job 4 times because whenever the HR assistant managing that job left, ...


8

You seem too emotionally involved. Frankly, I think that continuing to lingering in this hate and vendetta fantasies for the company is not healthy for you; I perfectly get that unfair treatment and being fired is terrible, but you have to move on, emotionally and professionally. Yes, you could play some tricks on them, but you have a commitment as a ...


12

Companies often have you pay and then reimburse you to minimize this behavior. Interview practice is always good. Just go, use the interview as free practice, and then enjoy your time in the city complication free. If they offer you the job, just decline. This strategy would almost assuredly avoid legal problems.


9

There might be nuances using which you can figure out something to avoid the legalities for avoiding the interview and use that company-provided fund to have a personal tour, but being very straightforward, I'd suggest : Don't do this. Since you already mentioned: Since they won't stop harassing me no matter how many times I tell them to screw off ...


2

Data scientist here. This is totally normal, in fact it’s a little bit on the short side. I’ve had sets of back to back interviews ranging from 3 hours to 6 hours. You’ll probably be working with a lot of different people and managers often want to get feedback from as many as possible before making a decision. Remember that interviews are a two way street ...


0

I have now found out that the interview is going to be over 2hrs 45mins being split into multiple "micro" interviews by separate interviewers on separate topics. Most of which have already been covered in part in the previous stages. The time taken in the interview is not necessarily a red flag. Some companies do this. By way of example, I interviewed for ...


10

This company has already required a Telephone Interview and a code project which I completed successfully. I have now been invited to interview, and they are very keen. Great! I have now found out that the interview is going to be over 2hrs 45mins being split into multiple "micro" interviews by separate interviewers on separate topics. Most of which have ...


2

Unusually long Interview time; is this a red flag? This is actually a good thing. It shows that the company is serious about their candidates and want to make sure that they are hiring the best possible fit for the position. On your side, this is a great opportunity for extended interaction with this company, which should help you determine whether or not ...


17

You asked, Do you think this interview process is reasonable, and additionally would this raise a red flag for you based upon their value of candidates time and energy? No, I don't think it's unreasonable. Although, it's pretty clear that "reasonable" is fairly subjective. If you think it's unreasonable, you can always decline the interview. "Is this a ...


26

Do you think this interview process is reasonable, and additionally would this raise a red flag for you based upon their value of candidates time and energy? I don't find it unreasonable (although it is a longer than usual duration). Each company is different and they surely have their valid reasons for having such a time and process. This does not really ...


3

As a frame challenge, you're overthinking this. Potential employers usually won't know how old you are, unless you tell them. Someone who appears to be in their 30's and has 10 years of solid job history wouldn't really stand out from the pack. If the interviewer even thinks about your age, they might as well just assume you're 32 and started working at 22, ...


4

I'm from a country where its not unusual to have 'informal' jobs. We make money, don't pay taxes, its easy to get one. Why is this a problem from a resume perspective? Resumes don't usually include information about whether you paid your taxes. Are you afraid of your government reading it and collecting back taxes from you? How can explain in my CV ...


3

How to make it not sound bad? Why do you assume it'll be bad? What matters is your claim about your knowledge and expertise and whether you're able to produce results / exhibit capabilities in the interview. How can explain in my CV that i only had 2 jobs, with 5 years experience each? That's an information, and needs to explanation. Yes, if you have a ...


1

In my experience, the issue comes down to LinkedIn simply having too many of these types of recruiters. For every 1 good interaction I was having, I had about 99 that did not add value. Most recruiters don't seem to even bother to actually read your profile, and some will even send me messages that were so clearly copy-pasted that they forgot to swap out the ...


1

There are two types of recruiters. 1) They are an employee for a specific company. If they reach out to you it is because they have a specific opening they are trying to fill, and they want to get you to the interview stage. 2) They work for a company that is hired to to find candidates/employees for their clients. They probably are looking for people that ...


3

If phone calls are an issue, then you can attempt to have the recruiter send you information via email. As a communication channel, it should be secure enough for them not to worry about "LinkedIn" reading their message and its a professional method of communication. You can also clarify what information they should send you. E.g. Job Title, Pay, Job Type (...


0

About your question no. 1: I would first listen to the customer in order to find out if I happen to know a quick solution to the problem. If not, I would refer him to our 24/7 customer service (helpline). If there is no 24/7 service, I will need to tell the customer to call our helpline next morning by saying that we don't provide 24/7 customer services. ...


13

I would advise not doing so, at least not publicly. It might make you feel better but it only makes you look negative. Basically it would look like you're whinging about them not hiring you. (I am not saying you are but that's how it might look) Would hitting back really make you feel better? I would suggest trying to view it as a positive. You put time ...


0

While many answers here explore possible expectations by the company revolving around the actual answer within the scenario, there is a good chance, the actual answer in the described scenario is not what matters, but how you got there. Such scenario questions often are less about the actual scenario but how you take a specification of a problem and derive ...


4

One of their employees, who is senior in the company, has reached out to me to ask to come to my university campus to sell their consultancy to my university society members. I did not say no yet. Why would they approach you? Does this require your permission? Wouldn't this be something he/she would approach the university about to get permission? ...


4

What you learned is that you should interview with more than one company. This large consultancy obviously doesn't believe that you are the right person for them to employ. Not informing you is a bit on the rude side, but not unusually bad. When you talked to a senior employee who asked you to do some work for them, that's when you should have told him. ...


3

While most software development positions are business casual or just casual, it's different because you are going for an interview. You want to show you have made an effort. The best thing to do is ask the recruiter or whoever invited you to the interview what you should wear. As it's a law firm I would immediately think a suit is a must. There is a ...


-1

If you go through a recruiter, ask the recruiter. If not, call their receptionist or call any contact that you have. As a rule, you should dress a bit better than you are willing to dress every day. If this is a firm that requires everyone to come in a suit, and you are not willing to do that, then business casual wont get you the job, but that is Ok if ...


11

Two things jump out at me in question #1: "aeronautics industry" "hundreds of millions" For the first point - A "code change" by one person, after 8 pm, is the wrong answer in almost every sector these days - especially aerospace (even if it is a simulation). Maybe that would fly (pun intended) with a startup... in some circumstances - maybe not. For ...


1

First of all, how do you know you were rejected because of your answers to these two questions? I doubt they rejected you because of content of the answers. They could easily explain to you how should you act. More likely they didn't like your overall attitude/nervousness/whatever. Or maybe they liked you but liked somebody else more.


2

It's entirely company by company basis. I recently changed jobs (over 10 years experience) and about 2 in 10 positions I applied to wanted me to take one, so there are places that don't require them. Not requiring them is nothing to do with how many years you have. It's usually just company procedure. Unfortunately these tests don't suit everyone. I do ...


1

Coding problems are more of a company thing: there are companies that do not do them (although this is increasingly rare) and they don't do them. Companies that do coding interviews do them for virtually all candidates, even when the person might be doing work that is well beyond what can be covered in coding interviews. Companies that do coding questions ...


5

From what I have heard, they can exist at every level I have a friend who is a very senior developer. He interviewed for an architect position where he would have overseen several different tech teams. He successfully passed 4 rounds of interviews with them on microservices, employment, management, cloud, design patterns, etc. His final round included ...


0

As someone who does technical interviews for a internet company I doubt that Amazon or Google would hire someone as an senior engineer in any capacity that the interviewers feel wouldn't be able to pass an entry level coding test. Given that there is only so much time to do interviews, the focus for higher level engineering roles might be more on ...


4

These are not the questions from any standard situational judgement test that I know of. The most likely reason they ask such specific questions, rather than administer a more general SJT, is because it has happened at their company before. It has happened at my organization, more than once to me and to more than one of my employees. It has caused damage ...


6

My first impression is that your answers are very out of role. Probably no problems with your first answer. It's generally rarer that a client can/will contact another company's engineer directly, but if you're in a position where a client can contact you directly, it's probably safe to assume that you have entrusted to make a decision of this level. In ...


63

I think you're approaching this situation the wrong way. You didn't 'fail' the interview; you gave responses that this particular employer doesn't want from their employees. Let me show you what I'm talking about with two quick blurbs from your question: Just imagine you are working on some important simulation system and a client call you at 8pm, he'...


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