New answers tagged

2

It's still an interview and you want to give the impression that you take it seriously. Dressing in a full suit and tie might come off as odd considering the relationship you already have with this group. Still, you don't want to come off too casual. Seeing as you interface with these people regularly, and since the dress code seems to be fairly casual, you ...


1

Follow the classic advice that If in doubt, dress up not down You will very rarely be marked down for dressing too smart. I have worked at companies that have a completely casual dress code for as long as I can remember and always wore a smart dress and blazer to the interview. Personally I would go full suit.


1

Yes, it’s for the team to get an opinion of you and you to get an opinion of them. Interviews are a two-way street, and I like having candidates meet the team in their “natural environment” so they can see if this is what they expected and if they’d like it. But it’s naive to assume anyone you meet in the interview process is not evaluating you. They will ...


0

Ask the leader the same question. Tell him that this is your first time where you'd be meeting the team even before onboarding and you'd like to get some pointers as to what is expected from you from this meeting; will it be an informal technical discussion or is it another round of interview. Be courteous all the time, ensure your tone is inquisitive. ...


0

Now, I said the above things in brief to my manager Why did you do that? What is your desired outcome and what are you trying to achieve? and he gave me the rights to make a decision on his process of hiring. This would be very unusual and your manager shouldn't not do that. It is their decision and not yours. You may have misunderstood: your manager ...


0

Let’s look at this from a different perspective. Is he the best fit candidate that you’ve interviewed? If he is, then you would have to think long on hard about on what to do. If he’s not, his behavior doesn’t even matter as your job is to hire the best person for the team.


0

Disclaimer: I don't know Japanese culture. You seem to have glossed over any possible mitigating circumstances. Peer pressure may have caused this person to act in a way to fit in his group of friends rather than how they act by themselves. This person was drunk. While that does not excuse their actions, drunk people are known to state or behave more ...


0

The best person to ask is your manager. If you manager wants you to make an assessment based upon that information too, then you should do so. This is not an easy moral question to answer. Culture is a big part of the workplace. Just remember that choosing to hire him is not an endorsement of the behaviour. We cannot give you a clear answer, but maybe ...


1

I wouldn't propose an alternative test; rather I'd just accept or refuse to continue the process. How you react really depends only on how much interest you have in this specific job. Interviews are two-way streets and you are judging the company as much as they are judging you. It is clear that this request doesn't expose them in a good light and tells ...


0

If you choose to complete a large project as part of a technical interview and suspect that your interviewers are trying to get free work out of you, one approach you could take is to submit all your code under the GNU GPL or a similar copyleft license, this way they cannot use anything you write internally (unless they violate the GPL). The point of a ...


2

Most companies want to fit all the interviews within a small window of time. This allows them to fill the position without risking losing the best candidate if they are the first one interviewing. If they have to wait a month for the last candidate, they may decide to cancel that last interview if they believe they have a good match in the applicants already ...


-5

what can be the best path to approach this without sounding not interested Well, if you are interested in the job you should already be working on it. Declining a technical assessment will never make you a better candidate than others who are willingly to do it. You don't have a choice here. They are the buyer, you are the seller. It's your responsibility ...


7

to implement a complete flow of creating and capturing image and video using custom camera implementation. After capturing the video and image it needs to be displayed in user feeds and to be uploaded to server. Once the image is uploaded user can upload it to facebook. Other users should be able to view and rate the video posted by you. Are they ...


-8

what can be the best path to approach this without sounding not interested, unprofessional or doubting their interview process? Doing the task set without any drama. Any pushback leads to the three things you don't want to happen.


9

Don't stress. These things happen. Just email them back apologising, saying that on reflection you misinterpreted what they said, and that you are, of course, willing to catch up earlier if that works for them. If you're on the fringe, you do need to be as accommodating as possible. So be sure to be as permissible as possible, when you list new times. The ...


20

I suspect you failed on personality If the irritation you show in this post even slightly came off during your interview, you got tagged as having a problem personality. If you get this annoyed at a couple random questions, it does not bode well for future interactions.


7

Because there's more to being a good employee than programming skills. They want to know how you interact with other people, how you react when presented with off-the-wall questions, and so on. If they give you the job, you will most likely be in a project or department team. How you work with them is just as important as what your skills are.


0

No, do the conversion yourself first. If you leave it to the employer to do the conversion for you, it's one more opportunity for them to mislead you. It would be like going to a car dealership and allowing them to do all the payment calculations for you. Also, note that you may end up working way more than 40 hours a week without any overtime pay (...


1

Not necessarily. Stating your contract rate is equivalent to stating your previous salary. Converting between the two is relatively easy if you know the extra benefits that come with being an employee. You can check the many many other questions on this site about when to state your previous salary, but in general stating it puts you at a disadvantage. ...


1

I have a firm hourly rate already established when I do contract work. Is it advisable to respond with my rate just to establish a range we can negotiate around? Yes, and expect to be countered with a substantially lower number, and do not rush to dismiss it as while employee salaries are lower, they include bonuses like paid time off, which may ...


3

In my experience you can learn more about company culture by asking about places where the effects of a culture are visible, rather than by asking directly about the culture itself. So, ask about the areas where the things you've identified as being demotivating would present themselves (without leading the interviewers by giving your preferences before ...


6

Here are some strategies I can think of: Ask the interviewer(s) what is their favorite thing about working at the company. Candidates ask me this question all the time and I love answering it, because we do have a really good workplace culture. My answer is the people I work with. It's not all of the perks I get, or the mission of the company or the tech ...


-2

If you want to go full stalker mode (not really suggested), but you can use social media to find out if employees who didn't go to school together, aren't related through familial relationships, etc. are hanging out outside of work functions. Look for positive comments about their work outside of Linkedin, or ensure that they aren't commenting about how ...


1

He told me that every interviewee is required to take a test on Coursera. If he or she get 80% and above, he will make an offer and I can get reimbursed if I pass the 80% and take the offer. However, if you do pass but did not take the offer or fail the test, you will not get reimburse. Either the CEO is lying to you, or he is just being supremely ...


4

Those questions are perfectly fine. Personally, I would not have expected their answers and I would probably have asked again just to make sure I did not misunderstand their answer and then I might have left the interview early. But that's not on you. The questions are very reasonable and the fact that I think their answers are ridiculous just shows that ...


10

So I just had this interview with the CEO of this company. He told me that every interviewee is required to take a test on coursera and if he or she get 80% and above,he will make an offer and I can reimburse if do pass the 80% and take the offer. However,if you do pass but did not take the offer or fail. You will not get reimburse. Should I ...


9

Are those three questions no-no to ask during the interview? You can and should ask any question whose answer is important to you. That's the only way you'll know if this is a job you actually want. Hopefully, these weren't the only questions you asked. Hiring managers like to see candidates who are interested in the work and the company, and not solely ...


1

Every job application I've filled out recently (for office programming jobs) include an apparently mandatory section asking about disabilities. This would be a judgement call for you, but that would be the place to give notice of this situation, however vaguely you feel you need. If the employer is interested in you, then most likely their HR will clarify ...


5

Sooner or later people will find out that something is going on and will start to talk. You should communicate this to your direct boss, but you do not need to disclose it to other colleagues. You could also ask your boss for some alternatives: You could start your working day at ten You could work remotely A good company/boss should not refuse such things ...


3

Most companies will have a policy that will require that when you accept the offer from one internal position, you have to remove your self from consideration from other positions. So If you accept the first offer, you shouldn't go to the 2nd interview. They do this so they aren't bidding against each other. I have seen this rule in several companies I ...


104

Wait until they've made an offer. This gets you past any potential biases from a recruiter/HR person/etc. that you most likely won't work with in your day to day job. If they rescind the offer, it's easier to point to your medical condition as the reason. (They may try to claim a sudden budget change but they can't claim you're not qualified.) Assuming ...


3

You should probably focus on your contribution and what you did. Lets take fixing the bug that would have cost money. What are the chances any of your colleagues would have fixed that bug just the same you did? Was it just chance who ducked last when the supervisor dealt issues to fix to each of you? And why was it 5%? Would it have been only 4% if someone ...


8

If you can't mention cold hard numbers, percentages are the obvious way to communicate the scale of change. In fact, I'd argue that knowing the relative change can be more impactful - for example knocking $1,000 off a budget doesn't seem huge in real terms but present it as a 33% reduction on a $3.000 budget, well that's much more impressive. The other ...


-1

Three years later I can offer a different perspective from my other answer: I'm now in the position to hire people for my own company. Starting with our first employee back in May 2017 we got almost all of our current staff via recommendation in one way or another. Of course we also got some normal job applicants - close to none of which we hired. ...


0

Lets assume your are by far the best employee in the world. Bar none. And that 90% of the people that have your job skills work for companies in a line of business that is safe from loss of income in this particular crisis we are in. But a year ago you picked a company that isn't protected in this crisis. Your boss can only offer you part-time work. Why ...


14

The facts won't hurt you at all, but in general don't speak too negative about your former or current employer(s). So leave out the opinion ("panicked") and just stay with the facts: My current employer fired two people due to the current health and economic crisis. I was put on limited, two days a week part-time contract. While I'm grateful for still ...


3

None of what your current employer has done is a negative reflection on you, so why would you not be forthcoming about why you're looking for a new job? Let them know that you need full time employment and that is why you're looking for a new job.


0

You don't give any details of why you think you will be let go, as Hilmar says above, people are often very bad at judging their situation. If you feel you haven't been performing well-enough, arrange a meeting with your manager to discuss the issues, try not to pre-empt what they will say (i.e. prefer "I wasn't happy with this bit of a work I did. How can I ...


-1

From your username, I assume that you're an Android software developer. As a junior software developer, this is a bad time to be starting at a new company. The problem is that many junior software developers are not getting the support they need from their senior co-workers right now because everybody is working remotely (or at least, most senior ...


-1

In the U.K.: Don’t quit. It is financially a lot better for you to be fired. And expect your plans to go wrong. Job interview doesn’t mean you get the job. And depending on when you started, even if they don’t want you, the company can be nice and put you on furlough so you still get paid, so be nice to them and don’t upset anyone. (This is specific to April ...


7

That really depends on how certain you are that you will get the boot. Quitting while not having a new job lined up is not a great idea versus Quitting looks indeed better then being fired and it's easier to answer "so why did you leave your job at XXX" which inevitably will come up in most interviews If you are very certain you will be dismissed, pro-...


1

Even if you quit tomorrow, you'd still need to work out your notice period. In my experience, that's usually a week while still on probation, so quitting is unlikely to help you prepare for your interview. It's good that you have a safety net, but I think you also need to ask yourself what you'll do if you quit now and don't get the job you're interviewing ...


-2

Consider hiring a private investigator to do a deep background check on yourself. If employers are discriminating against you the first thing they do is minimize communication in order to avoid giving you any awareness of what is going on, and thus minimize the chances of legal action on your part. That way, even if you do take legal action, they can say ...


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