New answers tagged

1

I believe you are using the wrong medium here: You want to be treated more maturely, and you say that you look and sound younger (less mature) than you really are. If that is the case, you won't be able to change that by asking such a question on an internet site. I would advise you to follow a sollicitation course. I don't know in which country you live, ...


11

I was held back in more junior roles for a while at the start of my career, and it wasn't because I was doing bad work. I was consistently praised for the quality of my work, but my contributions were too individual and too just following orders. Seniority is about uplifting the entire group. Are you proposing initiatives that help improve everyone's quality?...


2

This is a European perspective, so feel free to disregard it in favor of more US centric answers: How should I introduce myself to the various stakeholders? Tell them who you are, what you will be doing for them in this company and tell them what you can help them with even if it's not officially your job. For example: Hello, I'm Alice. I am the new ...


1

Go much more casual and much less like a resume. You're not selling your skills, you have the job. Notice that hobbies and personality are set as equal to this- your boss doesn't want a resume dump. You're introducing yourself, and your best bet is to sound approachable and easy to work with. Having been in this situation before, I'd go something more ...


2

Since there's a dearth of answers: The good news is since you are now more senior you actually do not have to say so much. You do not have to explain much. Make a brief list of companies you've worked for: that's enough. Be extremely short. Nobody wants to listen to these things. For continuity, thank or mention the person who introduced you and wrap ...


2

I feel I have to prove myself more rather than if I had been internally promoted. Also, I feel I will be under more scrutiny to deliver and know what to do Your feelings are likely warranted, but you don't prove yourself by enunciating your resume every time you meet someone. Presumably the people who made the decision to hire you were satisfied by your ...


10

It could be because you're a woman, because you're young-looking, or some combination of the two. It could be because you don't actually know technology as well as your resume/CV would suggest, and that comes across in interviews. But it could be, and in many cases when I think someone is "too junior" for a senior technology role is, that you lack ...


34

One thing that I found was a problem when I was a younger woman in a male-dominated field was that the language I was using wasn't effectively communicating my confidence in what I was saying. I think many women "soften" their language to be more collaborative, but people who don't know you can often mistake that for uncertainty or inexperience. ...


29

Being too junior doesn't necessarily mean you haven't put enough years into a certain technology or role. Years of experience is just a proxy measurement for certain skills, and what companies are really looking for are those skills. It's possible that your actual skill level doesn't match what these companies are looking for. I have seen candidates with ...


51

The feedback was that ... I am too junior for that role. The stated feedback doesn't match the actual data. So, it's likely either perception or an entirely different reason. You'll never know for sure. It's entirely possible that it's because you are a woman, because you look too young, because you come from the wrong place, or because of something ...


0

It seems unlikely that you are viewed as too junior. This seems like just an excuse. The more probable cause is you're a woman, which isn't something you can change so don't let it impact on your morale or self-confidence. If I were you I'd brush it off and just keep trying.


0

As @rs.29 said in the comments, you should bring this up with your recruiter. Let them know that you would be happy to take the test online, but if the test comes back negative, then you would prefer to simply end the recruiting process at that time and not proceed to the onsite interview, to save your time and frustration of having to take an entire day to ...


24

It is not about experienced or fresher. Most likely it is just about having that final check, gauge your work attitude and personality. If everyone is happy, make that call to the HR to release the offer letter. Standard process. If you have already cleared your technical interview, just be pleasant and nice, and everything will be fine.


5

Not performing well on an intelligence/personality test isn't a barrier to being recruited. There's many people who absolutely hate doing these tests and feel a lot of anxiety about them. I don't like them, I don't think I perform well at them. Your interviewer seems confident enough in you (as a person) to want to see you regardless of the test results - ...


2

There are multiple aspects here, but the answers to all are "yes" except one is "yes, but." The short answer is yes, but check a couple things with the selecting official/ whoever determined who is on the panel. Interview a candidate for a role senior to yours- Yes, in fact it is a good idea for the organization to get opinions from ...


3

If that person was not happy before, and if the situation didn't change, they won't be any happier now. So "training a new person" will anyway probably be something to be done sooner or later. And by experience I think people coming back like that usually have even less patience: if it took this person 3 years to get "pissed" with the ...


1

Interviews aren't competitions, they're there to see whether you're competent for the job and also to see if you fit in with the company. Just answering their technical questions isn't enough. You could for sure (like you mentioned) give somebody the idea that you're arrogant and perhaps unfriendly by not being social. I tell you for sure you're very ...


7

Talk to your manager or the senior panel member. There's nothing wrong with interviewing someone who you have had a previous working relationship before, as long as it is transparent.


0

Before you answer every technical question, take a somewhat-deep breath, pause briefly, then answer. Try to do this for an equal duration for all questions easy and hard. Normally, this advice is to obscure how much thought you need per question, but in your case, it adds a little vulnerability without taking away the quality of your answer. You should try ...


11

Can the team give this candidate a completely different interview focusing on things like "hey, the job hasn't changed, why do you want to come back?, how will you handle it different/better this time?", etc. That's really a question for your internal HR team and their policies around internal transfers - but it seems like a good idea to me. Are ...


1

Simple. If you leave them after verbally accepting a job where they pay you 25% less than you want, they are unhappy. If you accept a job that pays 25% less than what you want, you are unhappy. It's better if they are unhappy than if you are unhappy.


4

Ethical? Acceptable? Those are two different things. First of all, a verbal contract is indeed a contract when everything stays the same. It's the last part that's the catch. When the written contract is delivered it often has nuances, detail and even sometimes major items that are substantively different from expectations. If the contract is essentially ...


2

No: If they reject you because of that, you don't want to work for them. If they reject you for other reasons, it doesn't matter. If they accept you anyway, it doesn't matter.


2

You had a change of heart. If the rules of your jurisdiction allow you to walk away from a verbal employment offer, then you should have little worry about doing so if you feel the need to do that. It is not unethical to bring your change of heart to the attention of your employer. In fact, not to bring it to their attention would be the unethical thing to ...


15

Would you accept the job if they offered more money? In that case, it does no harm to say so. It never does any harm to walk out of a negotiation making clear that you would reconsider if they change their offer. "As you know, I would really like to take this position, and am prepared to take a cut in salary to make this possible. However, I've ...


30

There is a myth among a lot of smart people that they are held back precisely because they are so smart and so good at what they do; the decision makers are threatened by them and their skills, and don't want them to succeed. I see this in high school: "my teachers don't like me because I am smarter than them", for example. These people are smart, ...


1

If they have policies that govern their pay, and you're not willing to take the pay cut then I'd tell them that you're really torn because of how much you love the opportunity, and having reflected upon it properly, you just can't justify the salary reduction and therefore you have to decline. You might even suggest that if they can find a way to make it ...


-2

It's perfectly fine to reject this offer. You can certainly reject this offer. But salary isn't the only compensation. you said, "concluded that I would advance professionally more with a new company in a high-demanding activity." Is that true? Does the new job have much better benefits? Would you be able to walk or bike to work? Getting rid of a ...


39

This has nothing to do with ethics. You've had a change of heart and have changed your mind. People do this all of the time. Explain to this to them. Offer your apologies for any inconvenience and move on.


7

Following up from your previous question, where the negotiation got off to a bad start after a unilateral concession, it seems they didn't budge at all when you informed them of your higher current salary. This means You will be going in there on day 1 feeling underpaid They know they can push you around in future negotiations Your negotiating position with ...


4

It is perfectly OK. It's a non-issue. Just send a polite email with these words: Dear Steve. Thanks but I have decided not to go ahead with the opportunity at XYZ. Thanks again, Jane Jones. Note that you should not explain yourself in any way. It's unprofessional and unbusinesslike. Simply state the words "I have decided not to go ahead with the ...


77

Regarding ethics, it's acceptable to walk away, for a multitude of reasons. Firstly, are your intentions from the start were for you to reach an equitable agreement? I'd say that they were. You didn't harbour ill-intent. You may have misstepped along the way, but you didn't set out to mislead or confuse them. When I think about ethical behaviour, I like to ...


44

Now I want to reject this offer. Is it acceptable to decline this offer after accepting it? You did not sign the contract, so technically you did not accept the offer yet. Once you submit the signed contract and get it countersigned by the organization, then only the agreement is sealed. Right now, it's in evaluation stage - make your choice carefully.


1

I came up with a solution and explained it to him but he had another solution in mind and didn't accept my solution even if I gave him logical reasoning behind my approach. You can email him if you want, but if you do, I recommend you specify the time complexity and the space complexity of your desired approach vs. the time complexity and the space ...


3

This happened to me in an interview with a FAANG company once. I was very upset. However, it's really not worth it. It's seen as unprofessional behaviour to contact anyone involved with the recruiting process except for your recruiter directly, unless otherwise specified, for any reason, and in this case specifically it comes off as argumentative and ...


2

No, and don't accept an offer from this company. There's an expression used when hiring people - "A" quality people hire "A" quality people, "B" quality people hire "C" quality people. The explanation behind this is that people who are really good want to keep learning and hire people they can learn from, while people ...


5

Should you send a follow-up about this? Yes. No. Maybe. I wouldn't expect this to make a huge difference (if it makes any difference) in their decision in any case, but let's go through the options. No. If you explained it well enough during the interview and he still didn't accept it, there's a good chance he won't respond positively if you follow up ...


6

Keep in mind that interviewers are not perfect. In particular for your case, interviewers are not always strong coders. It's not out of the question that they simply didn't understand your solution. Along those lines, part of most programming jobs is justifying your solution to others. If you can't do that in the course of a meeting, your solution would ...


3

Don't email him, that time has passed and you already explained. If he's a serious professional he may actually have looked it up himself to check your answer. I certainly do if someone disputes what I think is correct. Having said that if there are multiple possible answers and I'm looking for a particular one, then it makes no difference if your solution ...


75

The chances of this helping your situation are slim to none. Depending on how the e-mail would be worded it could even significantly hurt your chances. If it was just one of many questions I wouldn't worry about it too much. If the rest of the interview went fine and you did show a general knowledge in other situations I'd be somewhat surprised if they ...


12

It seems to be a little-known fact among society but lots of problems have more than one solution. Maybe telling you your answer was wrong was the test. Sometimes employers are looking for you to push back and say "Look. My answer is also correct and here's why..." or maybe they were looking for you to entertain the possibility of the ...


9

Unfortunately, it is a case of "just forget it". (IF it was someone you knew very well and had a lot of back and fore chat with, you could email and say "I was thinking about X, and ...". But it sounds like this is just another corporate interviewer.) So should I mail him back with proper references that my solution was correct? ...


11

Some recruiters (not all) are dealing with a HUGE volume of people. They may have a hundred or several hundred people get in touch for one position. Imagine that it takes just 60 seconds to write "Hey Elisa, thanks for asking, unfortunately the client didn't select your resume as one of the ones that will move on in the process. I wish you luck with ...


3

Can a recruiter be a reference? No. A recruiter facilities the hiring process but has little to do with the actual decision making and has zero credibility in commenting on skills, performance or capabilities. Third party recruiters are even less qualified since they have a clear conflict of interest: they get paid when you get hired, regardless of whether ...


0

Have you asked the recruiter? Even if he can't he might be able to offer some advice. If I were you I'd go for not emphasising any of those 5 jobs on your resume and start fresh with a new attitude hoping you have learnt from your past mistakes as to why you were fired. On your resume you shouldn't need to put references, just put "references available ...


0

Maybe we are overthinking it, not thinking out of the box! And the question is not about which numbers are put in, but about how the person handles an ill defined contradicting task! In this case, the timing of giving the answer would be valuable. But even without timing, I think one can gain some insight into the character of the participant: One could try ...


1

> Should I tell them what they want to hear or what? Absolutely! This is likely a simple weed out test, if you pass it, it is doubtful anyone will mention it ever again. If you don't, they will automatically cull you as a candidate and the won't even look at your resume. A few years back I was reading an article about this type of test. The author was ...


2

What's the industry and how badly do you want this job? If this is just retail BS then paint yourself in a good picture; but not all 5's. If this is for professional employment then go for mostly honest. If this is for a top security clearance position with the F.B.I. then be brutally honest because they already know the answers. I would never rate 1 for ...


0

Here's how I'd consider answering it. This may or may not inform your choice :-) Aim - Coveys that you have small dents in your armour but no chinks. Near perfect. Admits to not being superman. Maybe make a 4 a 3 in the least crucial case. So - maybe 4 4 4 4 4 4 . Or perhaps 4 4 4 3 4 4 . Shows that you are thinking about it.


5

The only good answer to a remark like this is to say: What? You only get 3 or 4 a day! I get at least 10 a day. After all, he's only saying 3 or 4 a day probably because he's also getting 3 or 4 messages on LinkedIn a day. So it's only right that you tease him back by saying that you're getting way more than him. Besides, even if you're wrong, what is ...


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