New answers tagged

0

It's a normal situation. A company with an open position will (hopefully) find one or more candidates who are good enough to fill the position, and there will be one who is the best in their estimation, one is second best and so on. And the first two may be actually exactly equal, but they can only make one offer for one free position. So what they did was ...


0

Why not be honest? Tell them that you accepted company X's offer because they came first and you needed to be employed. However, you really like company Y and wish to be employed there. Tell them that you are fully opened to accepting a position if offered, even if you are considered second choice. Overall it doesn't sound too complicated of a situation. ...


0

It should be fine to ask about how career progression works at the company and how this ties in to things like pay during the interview process. Then you can raise this for discussion when they do make an offer. Its not uncommon for startups to be fairly flexible about seniority of a given position. E.g. if we get a good junior person they do project a but ...


4

This isn't necessarily meant to contradict the existing answers about selection bias or performance anxiety. They're good. But I want to address a specific part of your question: Is there something wrong with our colleges? Yes. Or no. Depends on perspective. But I'm going to relay two conversations that I had in the last few years with two different ...


5

Lets pull apart your first paragraph. I went to the final round of interview of two companies X and Y. I like company Y much more than X. Company X gave me an offer and I accepted. I have started the hiring process with them. I assume that the offer from X is a written offer without contingencies, and not an verbal offer, or an offer that requires a ...


10

I am not sure if I should even consider Y's "offer" in the first place, especially since I am their backup. If you want to work for Company Y, you should not be offended being their backup. Many offers are made after someone else rejects an offer. Usually the company doesn't tell you and you never know. Either way, once you join the company it won'...


1

TL;DR: These are all not good interview words, but not because of the contraction (which chasly points out is more likely native speakers softly saying syllables or eliding them); but because the words are not active, strong words. Using active words helps you make your case for being hired. Breaking down case by case: For "wanna", on a similar ...


-1

To be honest, the one who is unprofessional in this instance is you. Every last question they asked you is legitimate, and they were correct in assessing you as below average. There is no such thing as an irrelevant interview question. Every last question is to elicit a response from you that is then used to gauge your suitability. Part of it is to see ...


0

I recently had the worst interview of my life and I was considering doing the same . But don't do anything . Forget about it and if they come with an offer tell them that unfortunately you have already secured a position and you are no longer interested in exploring new opportunities .. You have your values and it was obvious to you that your values ...


1

I can tell you this, I've gotten at least once job by showing in the interview that I'm a highly effective communicator, and being able to articulate and enunciate your words carefully is a large part of that. I wouldn't say there is a "Wrong" or "right" way to do an interview. There's only things that will be more likely to help you, or ...


7

I've been on both sides of plenty of interviews, and this is something I've never even thought about. I can see how it could be a concern for someone for whom English is a second language, but I think for most interviewers, it's not. The important thing in an interview is to know your stuff and communicate well. Trying to monitor yourself to keep from using ...


7

If you're speaking a language that is not your first language, there is a golden rule about any kind of informal language, whether that's slang, abbreviations, or anything. If you have to ask whether you should use it, then you shouldn't In a formal setting like an interview, formal language is not only recommended, it is expected. Some informality is ...


46

"wanna" , "gotta", "gonna", "lotta" , "kinda" This is more complicated than you may realise. I'll give the long explanation and follow it with suggestions about how to proceed. Explanation With the exception of "kinda", these aren't slang. They are inaccurate textual attempts to reproduce the ...


3

Maybe this is something the others answers over looked, but... I think it depends whether we're talking about an interview in a country where English is the main language, or in a country where it is not the main language but the interview is in English because (for example) they want to test your fluency because you will need it while doing your job. If you ...


88

You should use the same language that you would use when speaking to colleagues during your actual work. Part of what you need to achieve in an interview is to present yourself as someone the interviewers want to work with and see every day. Speaking in a way you consider to be "robotic" is unlikely to leave them with this impression. Instead, ...


88

should i use this expression or i should use want to got to, going to , a lot of etc ? It's better if you refrain from using those words you mention, because using it will give a less professional impression than if you use the correct words. Of course, it's not a life or death situation if you forget and use a such words a few times, but it's better if ...


11

I feel like Joe's answer is enlightening in that it does explain that the pool of interviewees thins out naturally due to the fact that a good candidate can find a job quicker than a bad candidate. My response is aligned with Ash's in that this is a simple problem solving exercise. I've conducted interviews at my current employer for several years now, and ...


21

While I agree with most of the existing answers, this is another issue: Most good programmers should be able to write out on paper a program which does this in a under a couple of minutes. Many good programmers are not very comfortable with paper programming. Yes they should be able to explain and develop an algorithm on paper, but they might feel out of ...


2

I cannot confirm whether the statistics are true or not, but maybe I can suggest a reasonable explanation for this. Most programming courses in university do little to no programming at all, and a student can get by with little to no programming by opting only for theory courses. The problem is, unless the university is smart and directly provides it, most ...


91

There is a deeper phenomenon here: The majority of applicants for any given job are below average That sounds counter-intuitive, right? But, think for a moment. Good applicants get jobs quickly. They go for an interview, maybe two, they have a pleasant chat with the interviewer, they answer the questions correctly, they get an offer. Bad applicants ...


16

Yes - and that makes the exercise useful for the interviewer! I've been on the hiring panel for Software Engineering jobs, and programmer applicants straight out of uni are universally unable to do the following: Write FizzBuzz (or a similar simple program.) From only the specifications alone, without any help from the interviewers In the programming ...


2

No Directly quoting your link http://weblog.raganwald.com/2007/01/dont-overthink-fizzbuzz.html UPDATE: If you think that I just claimed that 199 out of 200 working programmers cannot code, stop immediately and either read my follow-up explaining the math, or read Joel’s article on why companies aren’t as picky as they think they are. Thank you.


5

Are a large proportion of programming job applicants unable to implement FizzBuzz (or a similarly simple task)? Yes. I can't think of a single client, friend or my own interview process that was not plagued with that issue where simplest of technical tests, without access to google the answer, do not sieve out majority of candidates. Are most comp-sci ...


1

I completely agree with @mcknz's answer. They may tell you about this other position at the end. I remember one time I was at an interview where they had multiple openings within the same engineering department. With my situation, I was applying to more of a software related position. At the end of the interview, they said, "You're a good fit but we ...


12

Should I just wait until the end to see if I get offered the position? Or inquire about it ASAP? If you want to play it safe, then continue with the interview process. Asking about a switch to a different position may give the impression that you would not be happy if offered the current role. It's possible that they have a set of candidates already in late ...


-1

Although my reply is cast in a personal context you may be able to generalize a solution to your challenge from my experiences. At one time in life I had interviews with intellectual property law firms in various regions of the United States. The whole process was dominated by the politics of law firms at the partnership level. Most of the interview time was ...


25

Is it worth it to email them to withdraw from the process and tell them why I'm withdrawing? No I don't want to burn bridges necessarily Then don't. but I also won't work there unless they change how they approach interviewing. You haven't got a job offer and probably won't get one. So this is a moot point. Write it off to experience and move forwards. ...


3

Its EXTREMELY normal for an applicant to be interviewing at multiple places with differing timeline. Recruiters will almost always ask what your status is at other companies. Tell them. They will speed things up if possible. This is common place and they deal with it a dozen times a day. I can't tell you the number of times I've taken a last minute ...


5

It would be inappropriate to communicate with employees and try to get hints on what the questions may be about. It was already a bit inappropriate to form connections on LinkedIn with existing employees, though much more mildly. At best, you'll be seen as unsure and desperate. At worst, dishonest and subvertive. If the field is very broad, they will give ...


1

I wouldn't. As this was an on-site, it's probably the last round of interviews and you'll get an offer or not shortly. Let the company come to you. If they like you and they extend an offer, then you can decline the offer and explain why (and I wouldn't change much from what you've written here to be honest, at least in terms of the level of detail, ...


0

If I were to email them withdrawing (and you should if that's what you intend to do), I would state that the main reason you left was because the interview process made you lose confidence in the position (which is true. Let them take it however they want it). At the very least, let them know you won't be continuing with them, just to be professional.


1

Good answer already, but it depends on locale and other factors. There is another angle though. I'm not physically disabled but I have multiple issues which are out of my control that can lead to discrimination. I prefer to be upfront and let them have a good look at what they're hiring because in their place I'd prefer no last minute surprises. I want a job,...


5

I would not mention it until you fill out paperwork. There is no upside for you and it opens you to discrimination. Once they hire you they cannot fire you for your disability, but they can make up a reason not to hire you. It's very difficult to prove you were not hired because of your disability. Once you get the hiring paperwork the will ask you to ...


0

If you run into an interviewer who believes that theoretical knowledge is important, and you don’t have it, tough. You won’t get the job even if you are completely qualified for the actual job. In practice, a company needs one person who can handle the difficult problems because you don’t run into them that often. And they need everyone to realise that a ...


4

Companies are very unlikely to speed up the hiring process for you. The scheduling of hiring processes is already a huge challenge. They have to coordinate the timetable for evaluating applications, background checks, the schedules of interviewers, available rooms, bureaucratic processes and a lot more. They, too, have a position they need filled, and they ...


3

These types of interviews can vary but here is one of my experiences with them. I was asked by an engineer to design a schema based on a car dealership. I was asked what tables would be needed, what relationships the tables would have, and how a general idea of the types of queries to be run. I was then given a certain amount of time to design the schema and ...


4

Did I lose the opportunity?? Too early to conclude. Shall I email the APAC recruiter who told me that he will revert back to me with a proposed offer soon?? Yes, you can email a reminder. If yes then what shall I ask him?? Keep it simple, mention that you are looking for any possible update. That said, regarding the statement you made I replied to him ...


3

Sweet and simple: "SHUT UP on Social Media!" Some things really are that simple. Yeah, it might feel good, but it'll be out there forever and you can never eat those words, no matter how you'd like to.


1

No, don't send that email. At least not until the interview process has finished (positively or not). You state in your question the company doesn't use the language you asked for questions to be written in, so I wouldn't be at all surprised the code is not as you might expect it to be written. Was the coding exercise with someone (ie pairing) or was it a ...


8

It was very poorly designed and badly written enough that I struggled to make progress on it. Don't point out a mistake. Ask for clarification. Psychologically this is very different.


53

In the future, a good thing to do if there's a badly posed question is to ask for clarification while you're doing the task. I've encountered a similar situation before - a company using a new interview format, and their take-home coding question wasn't as complete as they hoped. I asked for clarification on the unclear points, the same way I would for ...


0

That's what you get for using ArnoldC. Would it in any way have affected my position if I had sent that email? I once was given a code test where the exercise was wrong. I emailed the hiring manager and he found that they had made a mistake. He sent me modified instructions to account for it. Not a big deal in my experience.


13

Would it in any way have affected my position if I had sent that email? Maybe, maybe not. But there is no point correcting an interviewer unless you imagine it will end positively for you. Some personalities would feel offended, defensive or even threatened by an unsolicited email like that.


1

It seems pretty clearly there is a disconnect between different areas of the company you have interacted with. Not surprising in a large company, and also not surprising that everyone in all areas is not up to the minute on every potential candidate who is interviewing or wants to find a position. This is assuming you didn't actually interview or have ...


8

So there should never been a problem with you inspecting processes used at a job interview, it should actually be the standard to ensure you completely understand all the processes in the workplace before you decide to work for them, otherwise it can lead to issues for them and you. They don't want to hire someone who will quit before three months, and ...


6

So your weakness is not communication skills. Your problem is that: when working without brief or being given oral one you tend to inquire a lot into topic. More than when working with written one. Reason for this might be you have time to do research/check information or you can just easily go back to previous point when reading. So this "weakness"...


0

"I am Senior Java Developer with over 6 years experience." No, you are not. 5 years is BARELY not junior. To be a senior you need to be either very talented or have more AND.... ...Senior is not about doing the same thing over and over and over again. It is about experience and a WIDE field of knowledge. as all my Java experience came just from ...


2

I have to disagree with these answers so far. Keep in mind that the people interviewing you will not usually disclose why you're being turned down. They may point to a wrong answer to a question, when pressed, but that is not necessarily the real reason. The real reason could be something far more subjective relating to their assessment of how your ...


1

There are undoubtedly working environments where it highly useful/necessary to know everything about the Java Memory Model or to have other theoretical knowledge. However I think that for the majority of companies where they make "run-of-the-mill" administrative software it really is not that important or useful. It is however the case that a lot ...


43

Does that make me a bad candidate? That would be up for the company to decide, but I can tell you why it would make you a bad candidate when I hire: There is no fixed definition of what Junior/Intermediate/Senior means. Any company can define their own titles and meanings. But there are two definitions by which I go and which make sense in most contexts, ...


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