New answers tagged

1

Here's the thing about any employment relationship: It's always a two-way street. Even if you think you were fired solely because of things which were within your control, there is a chance (I'd say a good chance) that there are some things which contributed to your termination that were not under your control. The bottom line is, this company has ...


4

I am going to try to give an actually constructive answer, where to go from here: The facts are you have lied to the currently recruiter, or, "spectacularly omitted facts" regarding the absurd question "Will I be found out", you already know the answer as you yourself have said, you want to come clean to Current Recruiter What to ...


-1

should give the meeting in person a chance I can see no reason, whatsoever, that you would not go to the interview. Of course, obviously, go to the interview to learn more. (Even if you had firmly decided to not work there.) Yes, of course go. it is strange to be asked to give meeting dates myself first for them to select one; It's completely normal. I ...


15

The majority of the points/doubts you list are paper thin, and at times border on the nonsensical (They scheduled a meeting for a Friday afternoon? The monsters!), probably the only two that are of any note are regarding benefits and salary. It does sound very much as though if you go there you aren't getting any "fancy" benefits and you probably ...


5

Attending a second interview does not commit you to taking the job. It means that there are still open questions that need to be resolved before making a decision, and from what you write, you do have such open questions, because various small things have made you doubt that it is the right decision for you, but the signals were somewhat indirect, and might ...


24

You do seem to be over-reacting. You've asked questions and had some very honest answers - this would be a huge positive for me. Some of your points suggest you may prefer a larger company with more formal processes though so maybe this company isn't right for you? If you'd like to give them the benefit of the doubt for now, here's some notes on why I don'...


1

Interviews are a two way exchange. If they aren't feeling you, or you aren't feeling them, then neither party should commit to the job. That's the whole point of the interview process. Gut instinct matters a ton when it comes to interviews. If your gut says there's something sketchy, bail, because it probably picked up on even more than you consciously did.


3

Is it bad idea to interview with dream companies if your interview skills is not up to snuff? Yes, you're not maximising your chances of getting the job. The easiest way to get jobs with poor interviewing skills is to do so through your network.


15

Everything is computerized. Anytime they type your last name into their system, their HR database is going to find your previous employee record. And then, there is your social security number (or if you're not in the United States, whatever they call such an identifier in your country). Without a different social security number, their systems are not going ...


8

I refer you to this answer I wrote a few hours ago: The absolute, completely worst thing you can do is to lie about it. That would be the end of your chances with that company now and at any point in the future, because nobody wants a liar in their company. While it seems that the HR team here didn't meet my definition of "minimally competent", ...


4

I have previously interviewed with team A at a company, got to the final stage (where I didn’t perform well) and got a rejection. Now, after some time, I am interviewing with team B within the same company. I am wondering what to tell team B if they ask whether I have had other applications in this company. I think it's because I handled some typical ...


3

Assuming an even reasonably competent HR department, team B will have known about your application to team A long before they even talk to you. The absolute, completely worst thing you can do is to lie about it. That would be the end of your chances with that company now and at any point in the future, because nobody wants a liar in their company.


0

Probably not if the information was already public knowledge... "[T]here are numerous loopholes upon which an NDA may be challenged, such as where the definition of the “confidential information” can be shown to be “vague” or “overbroad.” NDAs may also be unenforceable if one can show the “confidential information” is not really “confidential” and has ...


-1

As a practical matter, CompanyA is pressuring you to rush. Red flag. Almost just on principle, I would tell them your decision would take longer (or, simply, don't reply inside their whacky "deadline") Recall that the entirety of every action of a company is to make you feel that the company has power and you have no power. Every single ...


9

If you sign a contract, you are bound by the terms of the contract. Does the noncompete say it’s contingent on actually starting work? If not, then likely it is binding, but only a lawyer could tell you for sure after reading the contract. You can either tell A you need more time (and tell B you need to move quickly) or take the bird in hand and sign with ...


0

Reading through the job requirement is your most reliable source of information. You must try to deduct that information to try align the vision and expectation. Of course you cannot always be sure on this. The safest way to do this is to say what is your ideal state for the job. For example: "I really like to design things myself, develop products in-...


1

I don't need to be motivated at work. Sure, you don't. But what if they hire you to be a glorified janitor, and then an equivalent FAANG employer headhunts you to do R&D on a cool new product? Will you jump at the new opportunity? Of course, you would. If you've worked on cool projects in the past, it's likely that you'll jump at the chance to work on ...


1

How do you figure out what a company wants to hear for workplace values, approaches to tasks, and generate appropriate answers? I don't need to be motivated at work. Read through their website to notice clues regarding their values and approaches to tasks. Ask relevant questions during interviews and listen carefully to the tone and content of the answers. ...


6

You can never know what a potential employer will ask you during an interview. Obviously it will be something related to the job you are applying for, but you can never know exactly. The problem with Scrum (and Agile in general) is that everyone creates their own version and builds their own understanding of the thing. Most environments are dysfunctional in ...


10

You will never know. It's okay, and means nothing. Few options, you can pick any one to your liking: they found your social network profile and didn't like it they found social network profile of hiring manager, and they are not longer with the company the project got cancelled, or budget got cut they have been able to fill in the candidacy hiring manager ...


1

Knowledge of the Job itself may be Confidential Information This kind of secrecy is not uncommon in very large corporations and or in situations were chains of non-disclosure are too complex for the interviewer to know exactly what he can and can not tell you. One example where I've seen something like this was an interview I had with Microsoft several years ...


0

It’s just a minor addition to the existing answers, but since my comment was deleted, here in answer form: I agree that it is uncommon, generally a red flag and a bad way for finding skilled and critical candidates, but there might be some reasons to it: very high prestige employer or entry-level position with a standardized first round interview company ...


0

Increasingly common There are a lot of factors that are leading to this style of interviewing in recent years based on my experience. companies follow a script interviews are seen increasingly as tests data is collected requiring a standard process general immaturity about hiring quality people interviews are seen as data collection exercises fear about ...


0

A slightly different context where this might happen is a short first interview for a technical job with many applicants who don't meet the criteria. A half hour phone interview checks whether it's worth both the parties investing more time. This is especially the case if the number of skilled candidates is less than the number who just put relevant keywords ...


5

Quite common if they are hiring in bulk Unfortunately, this is a common situation with some companies, not only in Germany but elsewhere. To put it simple, company is usually well known, and reputable in its field. Think Mercedes-Benz or Bosch. They do not have to be that big, but is expected from candidates to already know about them (unless they were ...


2

Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? I have no idea if this was the rationale for your interview, but one of my associates just went through a US military contractor interview that had a couple of similarities. In this interview there were no questions at all (it was to be a live prepared presentation ...


3

You also interview the company. Company also asks questions that you answer all the time. That is not a reason for you to tell a company: During the interview I will not be taking questions. I will provide a list of all the questions you might ask as a company after the interview Why would you do such thing? Or a company? They think their time is more ...


18

TL;DR: It might be an Assessment-Center In some large German companies, there is the process of an "Assessment-Center" (yes, the english term is used in german). I was lucky enough to avoid them in my career, and they are frowned upon by many. These are no regular interviews, but maybe this wasn't clearly presented to you. It might be that the HR ...


-1

It's probably not useful to speculate on exactly how common it is -- among other things, it depends highly on the country, field, company, position... But it's certainly not the most common way to do interviews, and with good reason: The best candidates usually have important questions themselves. For example, maybe they are trying to choose from multiple ...


-3

I would not worry about this at all. My explanation would be that the interviewer simply is not very experienced or enlightened about this kind of discussion. When I was just a little teamlead, I got no guidance from my company whatsoever on how to do these things, and I might have lead one or two interviews like this as well. The important thing for you is ...


-1

My impression is it will not be necessary for you to ask any questions for you to be able to answer our questions. It other words, all questions are self contained; they have sufficient information in them to be answered without clarification. Maybe they are busy and want to make the interview process faster, so they can fire lots of questions at you without ...


0

It's probably not really a red flag or unusual (for some companies). The company has just taken the interview process to the nth-degree. More than likely the interviewers do not have the technical background or knowledge of the specifics of said job (and so don't want to be caught out). And given their limited time with each candidate, they simply keep to a ...


5

I hope that this type of job interview is not common. In my field we have a shortage of skilled candidates in Germany. From the employer's perspective it's not only important to get to know the candidate, but it's also important to make a good impression on the candidate. As team leader I'm interviewing candidates at least twice a month. We usually structure ...


2

Like the others, I also think it's quite weird and I never encountered this behaviour during an interview myself. However here are the reasons I can think of why a company would behave like this. They have dozens/hundreds interviews more to do and are on a really tight schedule. They indeed think that a job interview is a oneway street where they get to ...


17

That is super unusual. It might be acceptable when the job in question is highly standardized, maybe unionized, maybe limited in time. For example, cleaning tables at a big fast food chain over the summer. They have this opening, it's not very flexible, they have lots of candidates and they are only looking for one or two to accept it as is with no hassle. ...


35

I'm not defending the company here, and honestly, this sounds like terrible interview practice. But, one possible explanation could be that this was a pool interview. In other words, there are X possible roles available within the company (possibly for different departments), and they are using the interview to figure out which, if any, you would be a good ...


45

I would say this kind of interview is very uncommon, and with good reason. Usually a job interview is so that both parties get a feel for one another. If it ends up more like a interrogation, then the interviewer won't know everything they should about the candidate. Of course, the candidate doesn't know whether or not they should take the job. You know more ...


178

How common is this type of job interview? Are there any good reasons why a company would prefer this one-way form of communication? That's pretty unusual and would be a red flag for me. Interviewing is a two way street. In order for a hire to be successful, the candidate must be a good fit for the role, but the role and the culture must also be a good fit ...


5

Should I follow up again or will it be too much? Give it some time. Around here it's just turning Tuesday (00:52 to be precise) so a bit early to worry perhaps, even more considering that the CEO explicitly told you they have had an incredibly busy week... It's not rare that after an incredibly busy week it follows a regularly busy week (at least). In the ...


6

Probably an unpopular opinion: You are not supposed to study for that at all. Suppose you get the position, then what? Given assigned the first task go "uhm sorry guys I'll need to study for this one" and take a week or two worth of working time. Get this school/college/uni mindset out of your head first and foremost. In routine work life and ...


1

is rejecting a person for having a skill that was never mentioned actually a real reason for rejecting a candidate? Typically not. It occasionally happens that during an interview the hiring manager realizes that there is something that's missing from the job description, but it's rare. Obviously, it's illegal to discriminate like this, but it's perfectly ...


11

Why do companies make up an unknown skill to reject a candidate? They don't, there is no reason why they would when they can just reject you with no reason. Perhaps they found another candidate with that skillset, or they were just going through the motions. Either way there's no point doing more than writing it off to experience and focusing on other job ...


6

is rejecting a person for having a skill that was never mentioned actually a real reason for rejecting a candidate? It could be a “real” reason in the sense that they have too many qualified candidates and as a result are narrowing their selection criteria. They probably had a long list of “nice to haves” in their head that weren’t mentioned to this ...


4

They tend to ask relatively common tasks that all should know how to do. Putting a coding question that takes the most senior coder 3 days as a 30 minute test is not productive. As long as you have a good grasp of what you have studied and how to apply it then just go in having had a good night's sleep. Trying to do an interview after working / gaming until ...


3

Feedback is great at improving Yes, it is but I'm not sure if this is the right approach. No it isn't. IF you want feedback, get it from 3rd party: ask a skilled/experienced interviewer from HR or from your peer or management team to sit in. The goal of the interview is not to make the candidate happy, but to arrive at the CORRECT decision (be it "...


10

Don't expect an honest answer. If I criticize you, I undermine confidence in me. Say that you did an interview for a software engineering role where you didn't have me write any code. If I criticized that, I might be planting in your head a fear that I am an incompetent coder. I want you to think that your interview is rigorous and thorough, even if it is ...


6

Personally, I wouldn't ask unless I became friends with that person. With that said, don't take what I say too seriously. If you want to ask, just ask. I'm just giving you my opinion of what I would do myself. If you really want to practice doing interviews and getting feedback, you can practice doing that on http://pramp.com or on http://interviewing.io (...


-1

If just half of what you say about the intern is true, then he has to go. For his own good as much as for the company's and yours. I do think that you should query the process that allowed a defective candidate to be accepted while - almost certainly given the ratio of candidates to internships - allowing competent candidates to be rejected. This is not ...


22

...[D]o you think I should go one step further and investigate how someone so incompetent was hired? Going to ask you straight up: What are your expectations of interns? I'm working with two interns and bringing two more on board as well, and I must say that the expectations that I have of my interns are pretty simple: Pair with a senior developer or ...


11

Internships exist because schools do a poor job of preparing people for actual work. School assignments tend to be spoon fed and overspecified. Being "familiar with a stack" to a student often means "I have heard of it and completed the getting started tutorial." "Portfolios" are often collections of slightly-customized tutorial ...


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