New answers tagged

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There are a few things you can do in a phone interview to probe the environment, the following are those which I have used myself. Ask the interviewers what they like about their work and what would they improve (it's important that you don't use negatively biased words) Ask about the employees turnover rate. A good place to work will likely retain ...


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It's entirely up to you to decide how much information you want to give them. If you think you're in a strong position and want to make it clear that they are going to have to make a good offer in order to attract you, then say so, and explain how you will decide between competing offers on the table. On the other hand, if other applications aren't getting ...


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Tell me about yourself. It's what I ask of people if I'm there for an interview. I've already read the CV, what's you that's not work-related? The phrasing of your question shows you think you must list achievements, accomplishments and other work things as "about yourself". If you live for the job, that's ok, but I hope you work to live. What do you do ...


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"Tell me about yourself" is always my opening interview question. At my company the candidate's technical qualifications are handled by people far senior to me. My interview really has two objectives 1) will this person fit well in our program and 2) can I sell our program to the applicant. When I ask "tell me about yourself" I am looking for a connection ...


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They owed you cash. You didn't get cash. You are being partially paid for the inconvenience of being paid by a Visa gift card instead of the cash you are entitled to. My friends often say "that item, plus $6, will get you a small coffee at Starbucks" to insult the valuelessness of the item. Actually, this thing, plus $6, will get you a small coffee + a ...


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That's a lot of stuff you can find out during the interview. If everything sounds better than on glassdoor I would even ask about the reviews there. For example the reviews for my current company were similar, but it turned out the company was bought up a year earlier and one of the former CEOs was let go in the process, so you can guess where the reviews ...


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There is no clear way out of this situation The internship where you were terminated is something you could have gotten away with because the company was willing to help you there. The grades you will only get away with if they don’t not check. And frankly, if the recruiter advised you to lie about them, there is a decent chance that they won’t. A guy I ...


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Is there any way for me to be honest with them, or resolve the situation without being knocked out of consideration for the job? There's an easy way to be honest with them. Write your own CV, using only truthful information. Give it to the interviewers. If asked, explain the discrepancies. If asked, don't make excuses, admit that it was a stupid mistake, ...


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If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. There is no ethical way out of the situation except withdrawing the application, or providing a corrected CV with explanation - since you are objectively at fault here. If your explanation and apology is sincere, the employer may even give you a chance and decide to proceed. Any other solution involves more lying,...


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You completely edited your question, which was about a recruitement agency doctoring your CV. Note that anybody who has given a good number of useful answers here can see the original. My advise is to restore it as it was. Note that many people here, including me, could restore your question, but it's better for your reputation to do it yourself. In this ...


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It depends: not always terrible, but never good. How well the interview went and the tone you use to ask the question will play a role. If you get along well with the interviewer and by the end of the interview you're relax enough to calmly ask "are you interviewing other candidates" in a way that is obviously rhetorical and just a way of saying "yes, of ...


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It's a bad (non-)answer. In addition to both coming across as a smart-ass and not answering the question, it misses the point (which may not have been made completely clear). They're not looking to make sure you're talking exclusively to them, they're trying to figure out a timeline for decisions/actions. Likewise, you don't care who else they're talking to; ...


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I think we all can agree on one point, a management experience worth "about a week" is not a viable experience in this context. Moreover, you could not handle the responsibilities and you had to let go of them to continue your existing work - all more signs of the fact that you're not yet prepared to handle those responsibilities. I'd say, refrain from ...


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It was a round number, so someone decided that you should get $100. I’ve heard of a place that always reimbursed $100 too much. If you asked for $216.59 they’d pay $316.59 as a final interview test to check if you’re honest - losing $100 is much cheaper than hiring a dishonest person.


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It may be that they already have a stack of gift cards and it was easy for them to just send one out. Like was said above, if they can afford a chartered jet to fly out a prospective intern I don't think they're sweating the $50 difference.


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To add another perspective to the other answers. Sometimes the answer can be that you are not interviewing elsewhere and it might not actually be a bad thing. When I was interviewing for my current role, I made them aware that I was happy where I was and wasn't looking to move. I advised that I only came to the interview as their company sounded ...


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I would pack it into a less direct way. If you, as the question-asker use some smalltalk to make the candidate lose the stress he probably has, you could ask "So have you already been interviewed, or is this your first time?". Chances are not too low that he may answer what he already tried


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The thing is: both of these questions are actually nonsensical. It's assumed that the company talks with other candidates. And that they do that until the last moment. At that time, they give you an offer. Until then, they are deciding. And talking with anyone who is willing. Now, it's also clear that as a job seeker you are talking with other companies. ...


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Sometimes an interviewer asks you if you are interviewing with other companies too. How could be considered the answer "Are you interviewing other candidates?" It may sound "smart‑ass" (which is bad), and to be honest it is. You know it's a smart-ass answer, so don't say it. Few companies want to hire someone who exhibits that attitude. Of ...


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It seems like you're asking two separate questions: 1) Why would they ask me this question? There could be numerous reasons, such as finding out if their competitors are trying to hire you, or how interested you are in a particular field / industry / their company. Knowing that you are in-demand could also make them increase their offer. 2) Is my reply ...


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How could be considered the answer "Are you interviewing other candidates?" It'd be considered rude, and it's a terrible answer. Instead, you could say: "I'm keeping an open mind, and I'm looking for opportunities". You don't have to give a "Yes" or "No" answer if you don't want, but IMHO, saying the truth does not hurt. Make sure you do not reveal any ...


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The most likely explaination is that they have some minimum reimbursement amount or whoever was responsible decided to not do the math or look it up and go for a round 100$ instead. The reason this is likely is that a company who wants to interview badly enough to fly you in a chartered jet (!) likely cares nothing for a 50 bucks difference in uber ...


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Clearly it was intentional, since the number is so round. This is simply how they decided to handle things, and there absolutely no reason to follow up on this. I think you worry too much about it. It almost like a waiter being concerned if he is stealing from the customer by accepting a tip. Or, in the business world it's like, somebody asks you for 50 ...


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It may very well happen that the organization has a policy for standard minimum reimbursement amount, and your expenditure was lower than that threshold. So you get the minimum amount ($100) as per the company norms. Also, are you certain that they did not mention any reimbursement (with or without the charge slips / invoice) for your time (for travelling ...


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Don't. The candidate is presumably an adult and is capable of making their own decisions based on the information they have gathered about the company and during that "are there any questions you want to ask us" part at the end. You don't know the candidate won't thrive in loud, bustling environments. You don't know if the candidate hates working from home....


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Unfortunately, as long as you are paid by your employer you have a certain duty to present them positively and to avert harm from them. That said, they can´t expect you to lie for them. Be very cautious though, because some things you state can be quite subjective. I see basically 3 options. Let yourself be excused from the panel. You could talk to your ...


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Near the end of the interview, offer to take the candidate on a tour through the office. That's a pretty common and natural thing to do during an interview. But it'll also let the candidate see the office for themselves (and the bad lighting and shouting).


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Amusingly, the people on here would be the first to pounce on you if you lied on your resume, but if the company does it instead about the job... If you go to the interview, you can learn the name and past experience of the candidate. That gives you a basis for finding their LinkedIn profile. Create a new LinkedIn account using a VPN/away from work (and ...


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It's not your place to make decisions/judgement calls for the candidate. Your task on the interview is to determine if the candidate is a fit for the job. In addition, the fact that you don't like the environment doesn't mean that the new candidate will also not like it.


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How do I warn the candidate not to work here? Maybe you should stick to the task at hand and not try to "poison" the candidates with what essentially is your subjective opinion. Nothing that you've stated in your question makes this a bad company to work for. These are your opinions.


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Yes, they are trying to lowball you and they've explicitly admit that by saing that it is "company routine" to ask applicants their last pay slip during the interviewing process in order to better match the offer to the applicants' needs Honestly, what better match in the offer they could do basing on the payslip? The payslip doesn't say anything ...


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From what you wrote, this does not sound like you where doing something horribly wrong. But even if an interview goes well, you don´t always get the job. There may be someone more skilled, cheaper or more the bosses son they ´ll go for. There are some things to think about, though. The main thing, I think is: Ask questions yourself. A good interview is not ...


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Asking for a pay slip is indeed a tactic which allows to lowball you by limiting their offer to an amount you're expected to accept. Actually, asking how much you'd like to get is a variant of the same tactic: if they were ready to offer you $100k and you said you'd work for $50k, there's no way you'd get what you're worth. There is no law against asking ...


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Interviewer: So are you familiar with git, things like branching, merging, rebasing...? "Yes, I have been using git since my first semester of university. Whenever I'm in a group project, I'm usually the one merging all the pull requests into the master branch. Just take a look at my repositories on github." The interviewer probably won't take a deep ...


3

I work in the Industry for about 20 Years, in Germany. Just recently I also noticed more and more phone-interviews. So that seems to get more common nowadays. That said, If there was real interest it was always followed up by an in-person interview. So from my perspective, deciding on an phone interview sounds unusual. This may vary with the kind of job ...


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I will start admitting I have not thoroughly read the other answers, just got a feeling enough to know nobody has expressed the same idea, correct me if I am wrong. I am from Italy, I work in consulting (not so smallish) and I will go against the other answers by saying: This is normal, everybody does that, it is not a problem. I have been asked my pay ...


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Unlikely. When you are a student, the expectation is your studies take priority. Internships exist to teach students about the working world and give the company a bit of a labour boost while you're at it. And hey, after your studies are done and you've proven to be an asset, maybe they might help you skip the job hunting stage and let you come back to work ...


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I think the approach mentioned above, namely saying that "my NDA with my current company prevents me from revealing such proprietary information", which, quite frankly is probably true when strictly interpreted. And it has the added bonus that an NDA actually serves to benefit you for once. But I think the approach here is to offer an alternative. "My NDA ...


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In general I agree with the prevailing NO: the HR guy told me that is "company routine" to ask the last pay slip to applicants IMHO the obvious answer is that it is your personal routine to decline any such requests, That being said, I can see one exception, though, where showing the payslip doesn't hurt and can help speed up burocracy: if you are ...


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This may vary between different cultures but most probably and extremely likely: NO, you are a student in their eyes and supposed to prioritize your studies. Short employments are expected. It would probably look good to have one of those continued employments from internship because that tells to them that you have shown your capabilities during the ...


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This is perfectly normal Most companies want to cast a wide net without incurring large expenses. You cannot do that with in-person interviews as that either limits the available people to those within driving distance or requires the company to spend a lot of money on airline tickets and hotels. For most of my jobs, the interviews have been 100% remote ...


1

I'd like to provide another angle for this question as both I and people I know have been asked to provide their a payslip from a current or previous employer for the purposes of verifying current / previous employment. (country: Netherlands) In these cases it was perfectly fine to black out any salary information and/or amounts as long as it remained clear ...


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Others have given good answers, but the final way to answer this (after simply saying no) is to say that at the end of the day the place you're applying to is technically a competitor. Letting them know how your current company compensates its employees is highly valuable knowledge and giving it up is unethical. Telling them this will hopefully make them ...


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I have seen this happening systematically and repeatedly. Note that your mileage/kms may vary within the precise European country you are talking about, the working sector, and the fact that the company is either public or private. I get the distinct feeling they're trying to lowball me (and everyone else) You. Are. Correct. In a number of EU countries (...


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General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) In the EU, there is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This covers the processing of personal data. Even if you agree to provide evidence of your current/previous salary, you should be careful that your GDPR rights are not violated. GDPR requires that any information to be collected must be adequate, ...


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Negotiate to furnish payslips after joining the company to avoid negotiation based on it. Many companies (at least in my country) ask for payslips from previous employers for "verification purposes". This is done to avoid candidates who fake their current pay and negotiate for a higher pay. In such cases, you don't need to furnish the payslips while ...


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This is what I'd say: I understand it's your "company routine" to ask for a payslip during the interview. But please note that it's not my routine at all. Make me an offer first. Should I accept your offer, then we can talk about payslips then. That being said, you are under no obligation to even say that. You could just say. I'm sorry, but ...


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Your current company most likely doesn't want you to divulge what they are paying someone to a competitor. Likewise, the new company won't want you to divulge what they will paying you to a competitor, so it is quite unprofessional to expect you to tell them the same information. Apart from that, a payslip does contain personal information beyond the pure ...


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My usual answer is, "I don't ever disclose my current compensation package, but I can tell you that I need a total compensation figure of $###,000.00 to leave my current role." That statement ends the conversation more often than not (which is what it is supposed to do). If they balk at my requirement, what's the point of continuing talks? Only serious ...


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You say “I’m sorry, that’s personal information and won’t be able to provide it.” That is then the only response you provide on the subject. There’s no magic, you just politely say no. You don’t need a law to cite, you just politely say no. As long as you don’t start to waffle, it is firm. Obviously this may end up being a dealbreaker, but this gives ...


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