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114

It's OK to accept the documents but read the conditions of the visa very carefully before you move your life to Japan. You quite likely actually don't have a valid visa (and can't get one using the documentation prepared by the company), since being employed by the company sponsoring the visa is probably a condition for it to be valid.


109

No, it is not a standard practice in Japan. I think they are just a startup that can't afford to hire you on full-time at the price you are asking, so they are looking for alternatives. As for the short-term contract, they may have specific tasks in mind they would like you to handle, that they can't handle with their current resources. The part time ...


64

After a decade plus working in Japan, I have three strategies: Directly reconfirm anything you are asked or implied to do Ask for forgiveness, not permission Learn the language, or at least the non-verbal cues Reconfirm, Reconfirm, Reconfirm I have found that many Japanese managers are reluctant to give direct and specific orders on what you should do. ...


58

I am also a muslim. But your concepts are wrong. You can bow and greet them. You are allowed to bow, this is the culture of Japanese. According to Islam, if you are bowing in front of someone because he is powerful or he called himself equivalent to God. Then this is not allowed. But here the case is different you have to follow their culture. I think ...


39

How should I handle greetings when unable to bow, without seeming disrespectful? You don't, you either bow or you disrespect their practice. The reasons don't apply. In much the same way as declining a handshake for any reason beyond you missing a hand is disrespectful, or refusing a Maori hongi at a marae is disrespectful (don't do this last one, it's a ...


38

In my experience (worked 4 years in Japan) Japanese are pretty tolerant to foreigners in work contexts. If you tell our coworker/boss about a religious reason, they will probably consider it strange (anyway they will do so), but live with it as long as The exceptions which they make for you are not too many (i.e. you should follow every other rule which you ...


30

That is all about being a startup, possibly not related to Japan at all. From the offers, it's pretty clear that they are short on cash for what they are planing to do. Probably an initial funding is running out. So it's not that they do not want to give you a normal full time contract, it's that it increases their risk significantly. The risk is to run ...


29

Our company exclusively uses Google hangouts for interviews. We are absolutely a flexible company. However, that is our video chat software so it's what we use. Another way to look at this question is the employer perspective: There is a candidate that insists we use their own video software for the interview, are they likely to be a high maintenance ...


29

Engineering visas in Japan do not tie you to a single employer, at least not in practice; most of my several visa renewals were done under a different employer from the sponsor of the prevous visa and the immigration authorities had no problem with this. However, to get or renew a visa you must have a sponsor (scroll down a bit to "Employer") who will be ...


26

I work for a big global company, and we have interns in Japan in my group - and some not from Japan. The answer is easy. Let their HR work this out for you. Don't mention or concede that you don't want to be paid - unless you are so wealthy that this really doesn't matter to you. Their HR has figured out this before and they have a team of lawyers to ...


25

You probably dealt with a HR employee who wanted to print out the candidates CVs and code to discuss and select in a meeting with the manager and/or tech lead, or something like that. It's a bit silly, but not necessarily indicative of the overall quality of the company. Perhaps this company doesn't hire a lot of programmers, or the person was new. You can ...


20

Is my guess correct? No. The requirement to use Skype doesn't imply a bad company, inflexibility, or bad management. It's likely just a nod to the ubiquity of Skype these days. You can obviously decide not to work there, but you'll be limiting your base of potential employers a lot. Skype is pretty standard fare. You would be better served to borrow a ...


17

Yes - generally, historically, male workers in Japan are expected to work very long hours. Female workers, less so. But your exact scenario may vary. If you're considering a major move for work, you owe it to yourself to do some serious due diligence in considering the offer. You really should talk to the company and your future boss about: The language ...


15

Don't do it! I don't see any reason why you should sign a contract for an asset that is required by your company and not you personally. No matter what the circumstances are, it's not your job to provide the company with tools to do work. It's the company's job to provide the tools to you. If the client wants you to be on-site, they need to provide you with ...


15

When hiring new candidates you must focus on getting the right person for the job, no matter their characteristics (gender, sexuality, etc.). Not hiring someone because of these characteristics is against the law in many countries so be careful you do not to anything to go against this. If you want to hire more women, ensure that the job vacancies are not ...


15

Would a better knowledge in Japanese change anything to my marketability ? If you are aiming to get a job at Japan, knowing Japanese will most definitely be of aid for you and your chances of landing the job. Nowadays, most people can speak and understand English, and most likely in the target company you seek they do. But, speaking Japanese (the official ...


14

Yes. It's okay. Take it. The position was uncertain. So the company took a risk and applied on your behalf anyway. It didn't work out for them, not this time anyway. But the visa exists now, and I guess they thought you'd like to have it regardless. So thank them and take the visa documents.


13

Once you fulfill your legal obligations leave. It is really not their fault that my primary company It's not your fault that it's not their fault. Don't allow it to be a factor in your career, you don't owe them anything. Should I conflict with the person who lied me about my job? Not unless you must, just get out as quietly and professionally as you ...


13

In general, in Japan there are companies that operate in Japanese, and companies that operate in English. Unforturnately for your situation, the vast majorities of companies in Japan operate in Japanese, so if you could not communicate in Japanese, it would vastly limit your choices. That said, even companies that operate in Japanese may make an exception ...


12

Consider the company's point of view. What if every job candidate had different preferred software? Now they have to install dozens of different software packages and learn to use them. That would be a giant administrative pain. And think about what it says about you as a potential employee if you refuse to use the company's preferred software. Suppose you ...


12

You can ask. What happens depends on the company. The best salary (from the company's point of view) is one that's not too costly, but high enough that you don't leave just because someone else pays more. If they pay 7 million Yen and you stay for five years, that's much more cost effective than paying 6 million and you leave after 6 months. Or you stay ...


11

(The following is based on my limited personal experience (I am non-Japanese working in Japan for several years) and on what I gathered from talking to some Japanese friends, reading the Internet, etc. What I say below is true, but not universally true, and quite likely is not applicable to your situation. Still, it may help you to better understand their ...


10

This is going to be dependent on culture (both company culture and general workplace culture), but usually if something is important for you, you should absolutely mention it in the interview. After all, if the company cannot/does not want to respect your wishes, you are unlikely to be happy in your job. However, you might want to consider what exactly your ...


10

Some time ago I read a post on one of the SE sites where a Muslim man did not want to shake a female colleague's hand, because he felt that touching a woman he was not married to would violate his religious beliefs. His solution was to put his hand on his heart and say "I'm sorry, but my religion doesn't allow me to shake your hand." As a woman, I would not ...


9

It is not normal. In every country whose laws I know, it is actually illegal not to pay you for the time you have worked. I would think that Japan is a civilised country, and in that case what he is doing is illegal. Whether legal or illegal, it is totally unacceptable. Look for a new job as soon as possible. PS. A signed contract is nice, but what you ...


9

One thing I can say is that Japanese people treat clients with the utmost respect. You are far more likely to be addressed as DarkCygnus様 (sama), no matter what your age or hierarchical position is, if you're a client, than as DarkCygnus-san. This is seen for example, in the general term for guest, client or customer: お客様 (okyakusama), and the associated ...


9

Repetition is the mother of all learning! You have to start the mentoring from the fact that he had a life-time to train to think in a certain way. It will take time for him to adapt to the new kind of thinking required. Although annoying for you, all you have to do is to show him time and again that using Google and certain sites is the good answer for ...


8

The only option I can think of at this point is to assume the company has probably gone bankrupt but I would like to know what are my other options? Second guessing isn't very constructive. A number of things temporary or permanent may have occurred. None of which matter. It's your pay (your whole reason for working at all), so you need to start job ...


8

I am actually working in Japan, and I can tell you that I am not surprised by their answer. It does not tell that it's a bad company, but only a real Japanese company. At work (and not only) they are totally inflexible with policies and rules, even if that sounds stupid for you. The good point is that nobody will never address you any reproaches for doing ...


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