267

DO NOT DO THIS You are interviewing at a bank. They SHOULD know better than to ask you for this information. It is possible that they believe your "bank account card" is just a simple "EC card" which may not contain any security features. They may not be aware that there are some banks that use a single card for transactions as well as for bank purposes. ...


137

Is it safe to do so? Based on my experience this is not normal practice and not safe. The company doesn't need a copy of your debit card in order to pay you. There are several security concerns when faxing, emailing, or sharing this information in general. What I would do is provide my checking account number and routing number so they can pay me. If ...


84

Typically I will ask to see the benefits package and the employee agreement / manual before accepting an offer. I am usually asked to sign an NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement) before that is provided, which I do. I would respond to the company, "I have received the offer letter, but it appears to be incomplete. Can you please include a summary or schedule of ...


45

NOPE! BIG RED FLAG! The information on both sides of your card is enough to put some nasty charges on your account. People interviewing at the bank should absolutely know better. The person who asked this of you (it might not be the interviewer) could well be a rogue employee. Either that or they are gauging how susceptible to social engineering you might ...


20

There is no shame in asking about the ENTIRE compensation package. There may be shame in not asking. By accepting the job offer without knowing what your wages, benefits, vacation, work location, hours, company car... etc tells your prospective employer that you are not a very savvy negotiator. As an interviewee, you should always ask questions. Usually, ...


20

The request from the bank is NOT scam. Seems like the OP is talking about a so called "Debit-Bankomatkarte" which indeed have a CVV. But I still think that the employer in question did not mean that card. It is more likely that the the employer isn't aware that OP already got this new card (because those cards are kinda new in Austria). [please note I'm ...


19

IMHO, sounds like a scammer phishing for personal information. No employer needs your card for payroll setup. Bank information provided on the first day of employment when filling up the forms does that. DO NOT SEND them these pictures and no more personal information. Instead, start researching the party you are in communication with.


17

Never tell a previous employer (or in this case, the company you rejected) where you are going to be working. While there are some places in the world where you have to do this (India comes to mind), it isn't required most places. I have actually seen a person from the company I was working at call the new employer of an ex employee, provide all kinds of ...


12

I wouldn't give them detail about what you'll be doing, for who, or where. That's all company-confidential information, and the other business has no legitimate need to know. However: Think about it from their point of view. They're competing for good employees, and they have a legitimate interest in knowing whether there's something they should be doing, ...


12

Your resume should only contain job experience. As you never worked there you don't need to put it at all on the resume as it's not "experience" at that job.


12

The best thing to do is ask for an explanation and provide appropriate information. In all likelihood, your employer is working to set up payroll for you. It doesn't hurt to make a quick call or email to a recruiter or manager inquiring about the request. You can always phrase your question as "I want to make sure I get you the right information, can you ...


11

Personally, no, I wouldn't consider it ethical. As someone who has been doing some hiring recently, theres a lot that goes on once a candidate accepts your offer - you start telling the second and third choices that they had failed to achieve an offer, and you start killing off adverts etc. So if you later turn around and say "actually, no, id much rather ...


10

I've been shown the benefits package in the interview as part of them selling the company to me. The job interview should include you interviewing them to see if both of you (the company and yourself) are a good fit.


10

Until you receive a formal offer you can also be informal. But you need to be careful about what you include. Until you see the formal offer you don't want to commit to anything, or quit your old job. I would just stick to the following format: Dear Ms. Waters: I was very happy to receive your email regarding the position of head 6th grade teacher ...


10

Should I give her a call tomorrow? Yes. Whenever you need specific answers to your questions, ask them in person or at least use the telephone. You can always send an email confirming what you heard if for some reason you need a "paper trail". As you have seen, emails can more easily be ignored. Emails can also be answered partially. While convenient, ...


9

This is not a difficult task. Subject: Job offer Body: Dear Sir or Madam, I am delighted to accept the job offer you recently made to me. I look forward to starting work on . Please let me know of any documentation you need me to supply, or any activities I need to complete prior to starting. Yours sincerely, Codefreak.


9

I interviewed with Google several times. The first three interviews are tough because that's what they use to screen away the candidates, so I suggest that you go through the experience so that you know what's in store for you. I have to say that I improved as a systems engineer as a result of this experience. If man bites dog and you get an offer from ...


9

Short answer: It's HR-speak for "we want to find out why you didn't take the job with us." But this doesn't make sense. It sounds like someone in HR has been tasked with doing some research as to why you, a favourable candidate, reneged on a given offer. Ostensibly, they want to try to make sure it doesn't happen again. Realistically, there is no way I ...


9

Simply saying "I accept the offer" without thanking them seems a bit insensitive. Trust me, you won't hurt any feelings. "I accept the offer" is professional enough. If you really want to say something, say something like I am happy we managed to reach an agreement, I am looking forward to joining the team. On an unrelated note: You could also say $(x + 3*(...


8

I took the question as this Do you have any legal suit filed against you which prevent you from working in US? This has nothing to do with a lawsuit. Almost certainly the US companies were asking if you are able to work in the US without being sponsored. You should have answered No. See: Am I authorized to work in this country?


8

First of all I would be careful of your boss's opinion as it will be a financial loss to them for you to leave. There is all the costs associated with finding and hiring a replacement to you as well as all the lost opportunity costs of not having an extra body to do work. Thus it is in his interest to keep you around. His counter offer is an example of ...


7

Unless the company has changed the offer, or there is a crisis in your life it is unethical to accept a job, then renege. I've know a few people that did this, and while they are all gainfully employed, I would not hire them. You will be surprised by how small the world of jobs is in a city. Don't burn a bridge this way unless you have a REALLY good ...


7

It seems strange to me that if you failed the dug test, they wouldn't even call you to tell you that you failed. Since the amount of time they told you to wait has passed, I would reach out to them. Don't ask whether you passed or failed, or allude to the possibility that you could have failed, just state that the time has passed and you're checking on the ...


7

The information they are asking for is reasonable, if they are trying to set up Direct Deposit for your paycheck. However, I've never heard of anyplace asking for that information BEFORE YOU ARE HIRED, and I've CERTAINLY never heard of a place asking for it AS A CONDITION OF EMPLOYMENT. There are still people out there who prefer to be paid with a paper ...


7

Is it ethical/professional to continue with the interviews? In my opinion, the point of no return is when you accept an offer. Since you have accepted an offer and are working through the notice period, you have committed to go to work for a company already. That company has stopped looking for a person to fill the opening and are preparing for you to ...


7

Should I let the recruiters from the other companies know I have additional time to respond to Company A's job offer? They already said they will make their offers on Thursday, so they should be preparing their offers and you should expect them by that day; I don't see what you would get by telling them company A gave you more time. Stepping a bit back ...


7

Should I give her a call tomorrow? Yep. To be honest with 20/20 hindsight you might have tried calling earlier but realistically I think your best bet is probably to try calling now. You've still got a week or so to try getting hold of them by phone but in the worst case you have had written confirmation that " everything was set for me to start June 3rd" ...


6

The company you signed with is obviously not going to be happy, but you should act in your best interest. If Google is what you want, then you should probably go after them. Even if there is some clause in the contract that states that you have to pay some fine (or something) for breaking the contract, if you can handle it, then why not pursue your dreams? ...


6

I would think it means, you have completed all the requirements, and they can now start processing your submissions. It doesn't mean they have completed the background check, it just means they're ready to start it.


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