16

How should I best approach this? No one here can tell you what to do, but I will say that once you start looking for another job, typically you are mentally done with a company. In your situation as the company is being acquired, it could go either way as far as your concerned -- so it is up to you as to whether to hang on and see how it plays out. Weigh ...


11

You can't. Send a polite email to the manager reminding him of your interest in working for him, but don't make any demands or "now or never" ultimatums. Then start your external job search. If you get an external offer before the internal one comes through then take it. Their loss.


9

How should I best approach this? I've been part of takeovers many times. Usually I worked for the company that was acquired. Occasionally, I worked for the acquiring company. I can tell you from personal experience that being acquired typically changes everything. In my experience, you'll basically be working for a different company - one that you don't ...


7

I am American, but of German extraction, working for a German company, so I understand the culture, and the business in Germany. Never willingly make an enemy, you never know when you may need him as a friend. Do not worry about what your colleagues think. If they like you, no explanation is needed, if they don't, no explanation is sufficient. So follow the ...


6

You're safe: Employers can only deduct money for training courses if it was agreed in the contract or in writing beforehand. So in the unlikely event that they ask you to do so - you can refuse and politely point them towards the info from ACAS in the above link.


5

No. There is simply no reason to do so. I also do not want my ex-collegues to think, that I was likely fired Stating your next employer does not bring you closer to this goal. As everyone who had quit before you haven't mentioned that, it would only stand out and draw unnecessary attention to your departure. IMHO stating your next employer simply looks bad....


4

Talk to your direct manager. Make it clear to them that you're not enjoying your current job and are interested in an internal transfer to a specific department, they should be able to help facilitate this process. It would normally be in the company's (and hence your manager's) interest to transfer a good employee internally vs losing them. Don't set any ...


4

I'd suggest that as long as you are good at what you do, you will always be able to find a job somewhere. While it's common for companies to seek out candidates with past experience which aligns with the role in question, that's not always the case. There will always be companies and hiring managers who are more interested in raw ability or cultural fit. ...


4

I do not want to look like as if I would do a last spit into the face of the bosses, but I also do not want my ex-colleagues to think, that I was likely fired. So do what everyone that is not fired but leaves on their own accord does: write a friendly mail, thank everybody, tell them how much you appreciate it to have worked there. If you want to be a ...


3

IMHO, just move on. This new situation is going to evolve in one of three ways. You continue what you are currently doing with little change; You help train employees in the US company so that they can completely take over what you do. At some point in the future your site will be shut down; Some integration work is done between the two products. Maybe ...


2

If it is not the norm in your (company) culture to mention where you will be going, then you won't find that much positive results if you decide to break with that norm and mention your new job. For those people that know you well enough to know your LinkedIn/Xing profile, the best way to show that nothing disastrous happened is to update your profile with ...


2

If you like your current job and your current salary, you should speak with your current manager. Because if your potential new job slips through the cracks and your current boss learns of it and gets offended you didn't let them know, after this whole incident, you may be worse off. It also doesn't hurt to speak with HR to ask what the process should be. ...


1

I'd do the interview. Any conflict or bruised feelings that might result are things the two managers can sort out amongst themselves (since they still presumably have to work together). I mean, I'd make sure the new prospective manager knew that you were already working for the company, albeit for another manager, but that may not even be an issue, depending ...


1

If you haven't expressed that you're really, really interested in the other department, now is the time to do it. The fact that you're citing "getting back to my [current] boss" is a concern means that you can't trust the organization as a whole to act discretely. In that case, it's better to not say anything about leaving. Just say you would be ...


1

Programming is a craft. You need to learn this early. What you are doing is education, and for programming, it is a required first step. What you need to be employed is skill. Skill is the ability to avoid mistakes and produce good products. To develop skill, there is only one path: practice. So to "get into" programming, learn and practice. I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible