55

I feel your pain, I have been there, too. When I moved abroad I had to find a new job, starting from scratch, and I had to learn the ropes in the new reality. It took me 6 months of rejections before landing on a job. What you can do: don't send applications like you are firing a machine gun, try to be more of a sniper: recruiters have a keen eye on ...


51

Before taking any rash decisions or listening too much to the advice here I think it's really important to find out what exactly this "PDP" means in this case. The term I hear more often associated with employees considered to be sub-standard is "PIP" (Personal Improvement Plan). Personal Development Plans seem to be a more general thing ...


24

Say something which is the truth, but not necessarily the whole truth. Depending on your circumstances, some combination of the following may work: I realised I was more interested in [industry X] than [industry Y] I realised I was more interested in [tech stack X] than [tech stack Y] [old company] really needs someone with a slightly different skill set ...


21

I have had a lot of trouble getting a permanent job that uses my degree. I find applying for jobs unpleasant and stressful. Sometimes I spend a couple days writing a custom cover letter and resume, getting someone to proof read it, only to never hear back. If you are really spending a couple of days on a single cover letter and resume, you are doing it ...


15

Try not to take rejection personally. Most people are rejected for jobs far more than they get offers - that's normal. In many cases, you'll be rejected for reasons that have nothing to do with you; for example, in one case where I did find out why I was rejected, it was simply the fact that I had 8 years of experience at the time and the other person had 11 ...


13

One thing that motivated me was to remember that, at the end of the day, it doesn't matter how many tens or hundreds of rejections (or non-replies) you had. The only thing that matters is the job offer — and you only need one of those. Yes, it can be a very depressing, disheartening, dismal process — but if you persist, sooner or later you will get some ...


11

I've had a similar situation of trying like hell to get a job with few responses. Here's what helps me Build a portfolio website to highlight projects and skills in more depth than a resume can. Most of my stuff is either for an employer or an attempt on my part to make a for-profit project, so I haven't included as much as I probably should. This site ...


10

If you don't have a history of job-hopping, you can say "It wasn't the right fit" and likely be taken at your word... After a few questions. You've been told bluntly I've been told my performance needs to improve in some areas No matter what they call it, this is a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). Your best strategy to survive is to get ...


10

The evaluation of a candidate is entirely subjective, and it is possible that a hiring manager could view your 6 month tenure as a red flag and discard your application immediately. However, given that your history isn't full of job-hopping, I imagine that the vast majority of hiring managers will ask you about your reasons for leaving, and then evaluate ...


5

There's a couple of very helpful answers here already but here's some truncated points: Only target a few postings a day. Spend an hour, two at most, and add it to your daily routine. (e.g., do it right after you get home from work) You can burnout on applying! Catalog where you're applying. It's helpful to acknowledge the effort you've done but also so ...


4

I see that you are in India, which has slightly odd rules (for westerners), but this should still be appropriate; Talk to the new company; make sure they know that you have 90 days notice to serve, but you are trying to get that reduced. If they insist on 75 days, that's a red flag anyway. If the new company is OK with your notice period, resign. Give the ...


4

No, it is not too soon to start looking. You describe yourself as "very unhappy", even to the point of seeing a therapist. That sounds unhealthy, and no fun at all. There is no rule anywhere that says you must suffer unhappiness for some minimum length of time, and you have no obligation to your employer to endure unhappiness because making a ...


4

Awesome question, especially love the last part :) PDP usually means that you may not be best fit for the position and, in most cases, are on the short list for company "streamlining" its expenses. Suggestion here is to have a backup plan for when it happens. You may not get fired, or fired in a year or two. You may pass PDP and get better at your ...


3

The truth is that a lot of companies are using software to scan through your resume. Those that don't also train their HR employees to look for certain keywords. Therefore, I suggest you pay a reviewer to go over your resume and recommend what keywords in your field are applicable to you and can be added to your resume. Meeting with a career counselor or ...


2

I'm sorry to hear about this situation, that really sucks, and I've been there. Here are some of my personal rules based on experiences I've had: Cover letters are overrated. Imagine you're an HR person at a desk reading through applications. One person hits you with a resume. Boom, resume, here's my job experience, here's why you should hire me. I ...


1

If they haven't offered you a new contract, then your terms remain the same. That's the case even if you're doing something completely different on a different project. You don't need a new contract every time you move to a different project.


1

I am in India, and I had a similar situation, where the offer was that I had to join within 60 days, but my then employer had a 90 day notice requirement. I had worked there for 10 years, on great terms, and I had a chat with my manager and told him that I wanted to leave and wanted a reduction in the notice period. They took their own sweet time about ...


1

how does one explain wanting to leave after 9 months of employment? "I've been put on a personal development plan and workplace.stackexchange" told me to look for a new job won't really cut it. You don't have to explain anything before you accept an offer somewhere else. Start looking around, and, if you really want to leave, when you have a ...


1

Lot's of great answers on here but I'll give my 2 cents: How many jobs have you applied for and how many outright rejections / ghosting's have happened? If that ratio is > 75% rejected then I would look at your resume/CV as something is wrong, it may be being flagged up by some automated system or you have the wrong skills or your resume/CV is poor ...


1

I find setting goals helps motivate me. Is there a good goal or "metric" to use for looking for and applying to work? I found setting a certain number of jobs to apply for in a day didn't really work. The time taken to apply for jobs is very much variable: I think it is important on where you're looking as well. Try all the sites like linkedin, ...


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