362

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


70

Do you also plan to take the computer, monitor, phone, etc with you? The answer to your question is likely the same for them. It's equipment purchased by the company for the purpose of you doing your job. I have a 43" monitor on my desk and a pair of $200 noise cancelling headphones. I'd sure love to take both with me on my last day in 2 days. But ...


25

As others already stated, these items are company property unless some unusual law is applicable, or you paid for it, either directly or as a deduction from salary. That said, if you believe such item would not benefit any further employee, it is OK to ask if the company is willing to sell it to you. For example, headphones and microphones that are hard to ...


17

This depends on who paid for the item in question. If your employer bought it for you, they get to keep it. If you paid it yourself, or if you received a grant from your health insurance, retirement insurance or some other agency (this is possible e.g. in Germany, to enable you to continue to work, referred to as "Zuschuss zu Hilfsmittel am Arbeitsplatz"), ...


17

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


14

What can I do to get the salary? If you actually resigned without providing notice, you are not entitled to two weeks of free pay. If you actually want to work the notice period (2 weeks), call the company (your manager) and tell them of the mistake in regards to the notice date. Maybe they will let you work the two weeks and earn the salary. In most ...


11

I disagree with the other answers posted. I think you should move to your new job. What you are experiencing is the fear of moving out of your comfort zone. It happens. Look at it this way, more work also means more learning. You can grow personally by dealing with different set of problems, having new people around you and getting more challenging ...


11

It sounds like you are losing your mind trying to keep a sinking ship afloat. Your company is terribly understaffed and/or horribly mismanaged if you are working 24-hour shifts, skipping lunch, and having 7-day work weeks. How the owner handles the separate issues with your friend's productivity and his kids' salary are not issues you can control or change, ...


10

No, they won't. Unless hiring manager in A is buddies with the hiring manager in B, and they're both particularly psychotic, that's not gonna happen. It's possible but highly unlikely. Regardless, it's not a good idea to forward your other offer letters in this way. If you withheld, you would've gotten B's counter-offer, which would likely be less than A, ...


9

Are there any other reasons not to answer the question? I'd say no, there aren't any other reasons. Disclosing that information is completely your choice. The only reason I can think this would be a bad idea is if your new company somehow forbids or restricts you from disclosing such information. In that case, I suggest you check your contract to see if ...


7

They are playing the guilt card pure and simple. They are not always to be believed, you only have to read several other posts on here that say “I was promised X... and it never happened” The CEO gives the excuse well the market did not pan out... So, you need to focus on your aspirations and reasons and make the move best for you. Ignore the guilt card...


6

Please don't walk off your job if you can possibly avoid it. Even if you are an entry-level food service worker, it takes time to find another person and make them familiar with the job. Supervisors, like you, are workers. And when you walk away you make more work for them. When you walk away that's all they will remember about you. It ruins any good ...


5

Several things I think of this: Regarding the Boss's son and daughter I would suggest you let it be. If they are unprofessional and irresponsible it's their problem. You should focus on doing your job the best you can (which is what you are doing). Besides, trying to argue or point fingers to the boss's son/daughter is hardly recommended, as you have the ...


5

One point, only beause other questions didn't cover it. If the desk is in your house e.g. because you work at home, then the practicalities and cost of the company taking possession of it (assuming it's theirs) may mean that they concede ownership without any argument.


5

This is something only you can really answer. I suggest you write down the pros and cons of your current job and this one with higher salary. Then, consider each pro and con and decide what is best for you. Consider also including things like company culture, commute time, things you will be learning, growth opportunity, etc., so you can have a better ...


4

Should I accept company A back instead? That would be my recommendation. What is the intention for company A to counter offer me since I already "betrayed" company A by switching to company B Exactly what your manager said: Team valued my potential and willing to learn attitude.


3

The company may simply 'not care' about it. It's probably wiser to ask, casually, 'Oh, by the way, do you need the desk back?' just in passing. If you put it in writing someone will have to give an official, binding answer. Under similar circumstances several years ago I retained items already at home, including:- A Mac Pro & dual monitors A digital ...


3

You don't make it clear in the orignal question what timescales are at play here so assuming you've only just done this (and haven't actually left yet) then you could try explaining to them that you made a mistake and you intended to give the two-weeks notice. If they accept that as an error and allow you to retract the "immediate" resignation you can then ...


3

Totally possible. I suggest starting your job search by targeting a junior software developer position at an engineering firm who creates and maintains their own software, of which there are many. You're mechanical engineering background will be very attractive to them, and could set you apart from other applicants. I myself studied mechanical engineering ...


3

After having talked to the manager and CTO, I understood the counter offer was made because they genuinely appreciated my work ethic and unique skillset, and that it was an accelerated promotion. I also left one of the best managers I've had who I am still friends with, a decent and friendly team, excellent work-life balance, flexible schedule (true ...


3

This seems like a terrible idea. It's not just "bad reputation" you have to put up with in a metaphorical sense. Companies get a bad rep for a reason. If they get hired they could use their time at this company to build experience and improve their resume thus making it more likely to get hired at a better company. If the company is really that bad, ...


2

Look at the two statements from your question: They recently gave most employees a significant "market rate adjustment" based on feedback from an engagement survey. and [I] will be making about 40% more than I currently do. You got the 40% bump by leaving. The increase due to the engagement survey didn't really help you get to market rate. You ...


2

I'm going to roll in with a "dissenting opinion". In general, unnecessarily disclosing information to your (ex) employer is a Bad Idea. The company is not your friend, and that information will be used to their advantage only. What you disclose might incidentally help someone out, but it may also harm others. Maybe they'll freeze wages because what they'...


2

Are there any other reasons not to answer the question? Not really. The following are all I could think of, and none of them are very strong: Possible (but unlikely) that your new contract forbids sharing that information publicly - this is much more likely to be the case in defence / security roles; They could hit back with a counter-offer to try to stop ...


2

I don't see a downside to disclosing this information to my current employer. If it doesn't hurt to share the information, do it. It may help future employees. Are there any other reasons not to answer the question? As personal privacy isn't a concern for you in this case, there isn't a pressing reason for you to not share it.


2

Just tell them the truth. This isn't a new problem. This kind of thing happens all the time. They will either compensate you to make up for the lost bonus (if they really need you), or they'll wait a little bit longer.


2

Get in touch with your recruiter and get clarity as to when or how soon are you expected to join the job? And how far can the joining date be pushed if you are thinking about taking a break between jobs? You can (should) ask this question without mentioning anything about your current situation/dilemma or any plans whatsoever. Asking over an email is best. ...


2

I know people with Bachelor's Degrees in Geography working in Accounting offices. Oftentimes, the simple fact that one has a degree makes him/her attractive. Put that together with an internship in the field, it's definitely possible. That said, you may have to take a borderline job doing "not quite" what you're after to get your foot in the door of ...


2

The company has the choice of accepting your immediate resignation or not. If they accept it, they should tell you, you stop working, they stop paying. If they don’t accept it, you continue working and getting paid. Best to talk to them in person, state what you want, and see what the company says. But they have the right to just accept your immediate ...


2

Well, you said company A is your dream job so I'd go with them. It's not about the money if both companies are offering the same amount. There's an old saying that if you ask for a certain price and the other guy says, 'yes' quickly then it means that you didn't ask for enough. Company A. must have been willing to pay you far more long before company B. ...


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