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364

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


293

You realise most people here would kill for a one hour interview that resulted in a job offer the next day, right?! That's great! I'd figured there be some follow-up interviews where we can go more in depth of my coding abilities and system architects logic. IMHO, I'm glad more companies are actually moving away from this style of all-day really in-depth ...


268

Whether or not the company shuts down is not your problem. It's not your company. Focus purely on what is best for you. If you're not getting basic rights and pay, then you should have been job hunting for a while already.


213

Be careful making too many assumptions. You are assuming: Your boss will want to get rid of you immediately, if there is not a lot of work There is no more work (either currently or in future) that you can do This also assumes you know all the company future plans which you might be part of Your boss won't value you enough to try to keep you around This ...


186

I would say not a bad thing at all. If all the points you're concerned with are covered - namely your advancement as a professional (by way of new challenges) and monetary compensation for your work - and you're satisfied with it, then there is no reason for betting on a new environment. Unless, of course, an excellent (in comparison) proposal comes your ...


179

Generally speaking, the overqualified employee is fundamentally less likely to be happy with their position. As a consequence: They will likely leave at the first opportunity. Generally speaking, if they take the job it's because they couldn't find anything better. This can lead to a certain resentment of their situation. From the company's point of ...


175

Regarding the first question, "is it legal?" questions should always be posted on Law SE, not here. As for your LinkedIn account, LinkedIn has the ability to change your email address associated with your account. It should be in your profile settings somewhere. You should change that.


166

Interviews serve two purposes, both very important. One is for the employer to assess whether you are a good person for the job. The other is for you to assess whether you want to work for the employer. A one-hour many-on-one interview isn't a great way for you to make your assessment, as you know. You can say to the hiring manager something like "Thanks ...


151

None. This is one of those things that you do in person. "Hey boss, do you have 5-10 minutes?". If you're remote, then a phone call is fine. They'll ask you to eventually write the email so there's a record, but your first step should be less... impersonal.


146

While turning around in an exit interview and saying you're leaving because your new manager is an arse may seem like a good idea (been there, done that), it doesn't achieve anything when said directly. The question why are you leaving is for them to get feedback on why employees leave, not for you to justify why you're leaving. You could turn around and ...


146

Please don't judge the organization based on a group email from Human Resources! They probably have a new-hire checklist they're following. They probably have a few-years-old email message they send to everybody. They, almost certainly, did not write this email and have superficial knowledge (if that) of what it contains. Plus, they mentioned "topics ...


128

Please don't tell them about your job search. I have witnessed this backfire. Just a few years ago, a person I knew worked for a small organization (a non-profit) which had grand plans for her future. She let them know that she was looking into another job, and they promptly fired her and hired a replacement. Their rationale makes perfect sense from a ...


127

Should I be honest and tell my current employers that the reason I am leaving is because of there nonchalant attitude towards my role? Or do I avoid burning bridges by keeping it all genial and making up some other, unrelated reason? I usually suggest taking the high road, and giving only generalized reasons for leaving like "I really loved working ...


118

Have him send a letter saying that, upon acceptance of any offer proffered, he is officially out of any other processes. Turn the tables on them and see what happens. They're trying to put themselves in the position that your brother has to take what they offer. Put it right back on them.


115

Cater a big lunch for the office would be my suggestion, probably come close to the $400 mark if it's a reasonable size office. Personal gifts sometimes might not be appropriate but free food always is. Take the opportunity to make a small speech and thank them then in a nice way. A private acknowledgement is great, but a public acknowledgement in front of ...


111

As a long-term webdev, I've been on a few search committees and we always valued LOW turnover. Nobody wants to invest 6 months in training someone to last 18 months. We had some good applicants we never even considered because they had never held down a job for more than a few years. If it's a crappy job or you're severely underpaid, then move along, but ...


110

However, I've always heard that it's bad to leave a job before you have another one. Does it really make me that much less attractive of a candidate? For some hiring managers, it would make you seem like a less attractive candidate. For some, it makes you look like someone who doesn't value work as much as other candidates. Some hiring managers would ...


109

Always, always, always ask for more. It makes them respect you and you're likely to get it. In your specific case, I'd ask for $10K more plus a $2000 starting bonus. Here's how I'd phrase it (or something similar): "First, thank you for this offer. I appreciate that it shows you have confidence in my ability to succeed here. I'm seriously considering the ...


108

Go for it. Be open and clear about the change in circumstances. Explain why you said no the first time and why you are suddenly available. Go directly to the hiring manager (if you can) to minimize the risk that it gets snagged in HR. Phone call preferred, but e-mail can do too. Something like Hi XXX. Previously we talked about a lead position on your ...


108

Did I do something wrong if I decide to leave the company? Of course not. You are a C-level executive in this company, not an indentured servant. You have every right to try and find a company that meets your needs both professionally and culturally. If this company isn't a good fit, you are smart to find a new one. Your boss is grasping to find a way to ...


107

When you choose not to explain a behaviour, you leave a gap where people will fill in whatever they like. Some people are generous and understanding, they say "perhaps Snowman has suffered a personal loss and is sad" so they cut you some slack and later you recover from your grief and things go back to normal. But some people are nervous and lack self ...


106

You don't have to say anything in that interview and a few canned responses ("looking for new opportunities", "want to grow professionally", "in search of new challenges") will do to not appear unhelpful. You are right, a judgement like "is a jerk" especially without facts to support it is not helpful at all. HR will just dismiss it. If you say your new ...


104

I have been working 100% remotely for over 3 years. Here are some questions you can ask yourself to gauge how successful and satisfied you'd be working remotely: Do you have a space you can dedicate to work, away from noise and visual distraction? What is your best form of communication - can you get your ideas across clearly via email and IM or do you ...


104

Update your linkedin profile IMMEDIATELY, report possible fraud to them. Change the email from your work email to a private one. Get a lawyer to send a cease and desist order to your previous employer. Ask your lawyer about identity theft and criminal impersonation charges. Also ask your lawyer if you're permitted to reach out to the clients.


103

You should immediately go back to the job search. You mentioned your concerns once, and they described your progress as "slow" and didn't offer any extra help. There is no way that this ends well in the long run. Find something somewhere else with a better support structure.


103

[today's date] Dear Manager I am resigning my position at Company A effective [date]. Sincerely, user62196 You are not obligated to give a reason.


95

As long as you are a doormat to this person, you will continue to be. You have two options. Keep the bridge open, or risk burning it down. If you keep it open, you will continue to work free of charge for them. I don't think this is really fair of them or to you. However, you may reply the next time your replacement asks, that you have fulfilled the ...


82

You asked, Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? That's an easy question: You should see something fishy here. The recruiter is clearly trying to trap your brother. If he actually does back out of all other hiring processes, he will have zero options. The recruiter's offer will be his only choice. He will be more likely to ...


80

My question is this: how do I get my ex-employer to stop emailing me for help without completely burning that bridge? This is actually quite easy - just stop helping! You offered a great solution that would help them and not give away your valuable time for free - they rejected that offer. And you have helped them on your own dime. Now is the time to ...


80

While you are still employed with this company, you are obligated to fulfill the responsibilities of the position. If your boss tells you that he wants you to write this guide, then you should do it to the best of your ability. You have already advised him that he needs someone trained to do the job, and it's his decision whether he wants to listen to your ...


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