15

Quite often you don't need a (public) portfolio as a programmer/developer. You can show where you've worked. You can talk the talk and walk the walk when it comes down to having conversations about Microsoft Dynamics AX programming. That alone tells a future employer a lot (at least, at the technical interview if a technical person is not present during ...


9

If you are semi-qualified, semi-capable and semi-nice, hiring and training a replacement is a huge waste of money. Not to say that it doesn't happen, but usually there are contributing factors that you should already be aware of. For instance, a toxic management culture (like a nasty power struggle) or if you're screwing up so badly that they'd rather ...


6

So I said yes to him while still looking for other opportunities. How do I tell my manager that I am no longer interested in the role that he offered me? Is there anything I could have done to be more transparent and professional? I'm assuming that you accepted the new role without saying that you would still keep looking elsewhere. Doing so ...


5

Out of point: My opinion on SAFe is that it is not "agile" but something that tries to reconcile management and product management with agile team. On the point: The issue is that like for any methodology the company can say "we're doing X" or "we're working with Y" and when you join you understand that they don't understand either X or Y and are just ...


4

My primary reason for working is to have something to do and some kind of sosial life. (dont actually need the salary, but dont want to work for free) I would suggest you consider reaching out to nearby university or research institution. There is a good chance they will have opportunity for you to work on interesting projects for a few hours a week as a ...


3

He is sure to be very disappointed. I am not so sure about. The job that you really wanted is not there anymore. It is normal to think about a decission even though after "accepting it". Remember what you said: which while being a okayish role, was not the "dream role" that I joined this company for. You are the one that matters here! I think it is ...


3

I am ready to work for a different pay scale. How do I mention this in resume without sounding desperate? Do not mention this. It not only robs you of all negotiation strength, but also makes you look like a poor candidate by you are communicating that you are asking for a position that you don't deserve. Reserve the flexibility for future negotiations. ...


2

SAFe is a framework, not a proscription. That said, there are some fundamental things which, if you're not doing them (correctly), you're not doing Agile. I understand your frustrations with an Agile process, especially if done badly, but if you work with it, a lot of the pain is removed (the "big bang" approach to delivery, weeks of forced "death march" ...


2

Nobody will know exactly what you did before. You will of course need to understand the language very well in your spare time. Stackoverflow would be a good resource. On your CV, simply state MEAN is one of your technology skills. It's not a lie. As long as you understand it well enough and able to pass technical tests, there won't be a problem.


2

I'd like to be able to show some projects to my future employer so they can get a grasp what I can do. That is tricky. If you come with the code from home, how will the employer know that you actually created it? If the employer wants to see you writing code, then they will ask you do undergo some programming test. They would get much more valuable ...


2

I expect a high degree of cultural variation here. To illustrate: In 2009 25% of the male workforce and 75% of the female workforce was working parttime (<35hrs/wk). I don't have more recent figures ready, but the Netherlands has passed the 'Law on flexible work' in 2018. In the Netherlands, it has thus become a question of cultural fit. It is more ...


1

My company rolled out SAFe based on the success of a grassroots agile movement. The good thing about it was bringing more of management into feeding us work in a more agile way. i.e. by maintaining a prioritized backlog and at least trying to do small features with more frequent feedback. The bad thing about it was it had a tendency to centralize decision ...


1

This has absolutely nothing to do with SAFe or Scrum or Kanban or Extreme Programming. To start with, lots of companies claim to be using one or more of these methods, but you see a couple of things. One is that they are frameworks and there are multiple ways to do them within the bounds of the framework. Another thing that you see is that the intent of the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible