210

Does my company own my phone number? No, they don't. Nor do you need a lawyer and nor should this cost you a penny (assuming that you were a W2 employee). If they withhold your final pay, you just need to contact the Labor Department or the Labor Commissioner for your state and complain of wage theft. I would provide a link, but I don't know which state you'...


130

There's the sad principle that no good deed ever goes unpunished :-( There are companies sadly that would lawyer up against you as soon as you say that you managed to access any data that you shouldn't have accessed. If you have the slightest inkling that your company is one of those, then you write them by registered mail to demand that they remove all your ...


122

Just ask your old boss. You don't need to provide a whole lot of reasons, or come back "begging" or anything like that. Keep the inquiry professional and simple, and see what they say. Right off the bat, you are saving the company a lot of money. The average cost of on-boarding a new staff is not cheap, and your return is a big bonus to them.


121

Have him send a letter saying that, upon acceptance of any offer proffered, he is officially out of any other processes. Turn the tables on them and see what happens. They're trying to put themselves in the position that your brother has to take what they offer. Put it right back on them.


102

NO, you should not mention this to the interviewer Two points: The recruiter does not have anything to do with the knowledge about how you want to make a decision (negotiation in current organization or not), they don't need to know that. Just because an organization offered you the expected salary does not mean you are bound to accept the offer, there are ...


101

Or It shouldn't matter as long as I build a good resume doing good projects and confident enough to clear interviews for higher levels later when I want to change the job again in Ireland or coming back to India? Correct. Software engineering titles typically only map to an experience level and pay structure within the company. Rarely does it map to how ...


92

I have two interviews lined up, but I'm concerned that stagnation of the economy could lead to redundancies in any organisation, and as the "new guy" I'd be the first out the door if it came to that. Is this a valid concern, and therefore should I think very carefully before handing in notice given the current situation - or am I being melodramatic? You'd ...


84

You asked, Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? That's an easy question: You should see something fishy here. The recruiter is clearly trying to trap your brother. If he actually does back out of all other hiring processes, he will have zero options. The recruiter's offer will be his only choice. He will be more likely to ...


80

Well, you get paid, right? At some point you must realize that: A job is there to get paid. Some parts of ANY job are not exciting. Even the most exciting jobs will spend a lot of time doing boring stuff. Most people do not have a career but work in a profession, get possibly a little up and THAT IS IT. You will not become the CEO of a top 500 company, most ...


80

My current employer asked if I'd like them to reconsider my current salary It means your current employer values you significantly – it takes significant time to train new employees and allow them to settle in the team/workplace. Assuming you didn't burn any bridges when you turned them down earlier, the smart thing to do here would be to save your own ...


80

Are there any reasons why I should let the company know? Because you are a good person and a professional. And because if you were still with the company and another IT department head had left, you'd appreciate the same courtesy.


74

Can I get a "Hell no!" ? Using other solid offers as negotiation capital isn't bad in of itself - and while the individual(s) your interviewing may well understand what you're doing and may well even have done the same themselves in similar situations you aren't just interacting with them as individuals but as representatives of the interviewing company. ...


64

You wrote that this is your second job as a developer and that you have been working in both jobs combined for around 13 months. I assume you still have a junior developer like role. When you are bored by the tasks a junior developer does then I would argue that this is actually a good sign because it means that you are ready to step up. And you might want ...


55

Starting with the obligatory HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND The exit interview is for the company's benefit, not yours. All you should say on an exit interview is that you enjoyed working for the company, your reasons are personal, and that your new employer does not want you disclosing salary information (if asked) and that you will respect their interests and not ...


47

Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? No, and yes. He was given the offer Tuesday noon and asked to respond Friday morning This is known as an 'exploding offer' and is almost always a red flag if the deadline provided doesn't have a clear rationale*. In most cases, job negotiations don't have real deadlines, and the only purpose ...


37

Yes this is a valid concern and no you are not being melodramatic. It's surprising to most employees how little capital some businesses actual have. You've worked there for 3 years what's another 3 months at which point we'll know a little more of what effect this has all had. My advice is to stay put at the moment. Note: If your company looks like it's ...


35

You can't. You didn't quite phrase the manager's fear right: Now if I were a hiring manager, I would (perhaps) be impressed but also very worried: if this guy maintains such big and important software, how is he going to have the time to come work here? That's not the fear. Let me alter it a bit for you: Now, if I were a hiring manager, I would be ...


34

Pretty much nobody cares about the title that you had. Everybody cares about what you actually did and what you can do. I tell you honestly, I have no idea what job title I had at one of my previous jobs - and I worked there for more than 3 years. Nobody ever cared about this "missing" information. At my current job I have the most generic title ...


32

As long as you haven't burned any bridges at your old job, it should be OK with returning. I was once in a similar position where I quit a job. The old boss was surprised at my leaving, and said that if the new job didn't turn out, I'd be welcome to return. Sometimes we make mistakes and things don't turn out as we expect. There is no shame in it. If you'...


32

In my opinion you need not tell them and at the same time you should stop checking their data. You're no longer working for them and working for their direct competitor. So, if you inform them about this they may think you're accessing (or have accessed) their sensitive data. It can make a bad image about your current company as they'll think you're ...


31

There is likely nothing to gain from your transparency. They may take offense and rescind their offer. If you want more time, just say you need time to consider everything. Even better, say that you are expecting* another offer shortly and would like to make your decision after seeing all the results. *Note, here "expecting" is important. You will come ...


31

When voluntarily leaving one permanent white-collar job for another, you perform these steps in this exact order for safety and professionalism: While you're interviewing, do quiet pre-research to figure out details about timing when you want to leave your current job. What is your required notice? (Two weeks is customary in the US if there is not a notice ...


29

You gave a months notice. That doesn't mean you are out of a job in a months time. It means you go to your manager asap and ask if you can cancel the notice. Obviously the timing is really bad, but the chances are not bad. If I was your old employer, and slightly hard nosed but not too bad, I might offer to cancel your notice, same salary, if you sign a ...


28

Technically speaking, phone numbers belong to the phone company. Your service contract with the telephone company gives you limited rights to use the number, but you do not own it (the phone company can reassign that number whenever they want). You signed the contract with the phone company, so the rights to use the number are yours alone. Your company ...


27

Should I be honest about why I'm leaving? I think the key word here is "open" rather than "honest". It's almost never a good idea to be dishonest, in other words, I would not recommend lying about why you're leaving or about your next job. The question really is, how open should you be? And the usual advice is: not that open. You have ...


26

I've done that in the past. I left a developer job to a leadership position in another company, after working on it for 3 years. In the new company, I spent the first 8 weeks, working all 7 days, due to pressure and impossible deadlines. I had a chat with my manager, told him it was impossible to keep that rhythm, and that I would be taking at least one ...


25

This is known as an exploding offer. So what should you do if you receive an exploding offer? Exploding offers are anathema to your ability to effectively navigate the labor market. Thus, there is only one thing to do. Treat the offer as a non-offer unless the expiration window is widened. In no uncertain terms, convey that if the offer is ...


24

I'm puzzled by a lot of the answers here. I'm not a expert negotiator, but I fail to see a strong downside to being direct and concise in a brief exit interview. Leaving for more money seems to me like the least contentious of all possible answers in that situation ("it's just business"). Should I be honest about why I'm leaving, if I ever want to ...


22

They said that they want to push the start date by 2 or 3 months. They didn't give a definite date. This is untenable, stay with your current employment if possible. My current employer asked if I'd like them to reconsider my current salary. I said no to this, because the reason for quitting was not so much salary as the nature of my work. Reconsider ...


22

You know what sticks out more than a short interlude at company A? Being unemployed for half a year. Even worse if you don't already have a written offer from company B. Also, you might like job A way more than job B. There's nothing to lose from accepting job offer A and then after a few weeks decide if you want to stay, want to do a personal time-out until ...


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