New answers tagged

2

Recently an email was circulated in my department which made accusations of a criminal nature against 16 colleagues including myself. I am shocked and appalled by these libelous accusations and I demand imediate action be taken. If some of the accused are indeed responsible of such acts, due diligence should be exercised and I expect active action so that ...


2

I'm one of only about 2 people out of the 16 who could have done it Based on this sentence alone it sounds like they are sending an email on narrowing down the possibilities. and I'm also leaving the company, so I bet most people will think that I did this. Yes, bailing out as soon as the email hits put you on a 50/50 odd as the person who done it. ...


2

One additional thing to consider is how long your notice period is and how much longer you will be staying with the company. Even while working your notice, your actions may differ depending on whether you'll be out of there in 3 days or have another 3 months to go. In case of 3 days, I would most likely keep silent and if asked directly, deflect with "I ...


8

While I suspect they know. I would ensure that HR are aware. The person making the accusation should not have done so publicly. If they had suspicions they should be made privately to management/HR. Don't respond publicly to this unless you have to. Don't give it credibility. Treat it as a nonsense thing unless it goes further. As soon as you take ...


5

Build trust with the new managers. The fact that there is so much separation between your team and the rest of the company is most likely creating uncertainty for the new managers. With uncertainty come fear and fear leads to unwise decisions, like injecting teams into your team to diffuse your independence. By showing willingness to include them you ...


5

First I want to say an email going out to everyone about possible sabotage in itself sounds odd/fishy to me. If such a thing was suspected then they would not try to give anyone time to build a story to or to cover their tracks. They would simply notify HR and management depending on the person who suspected it in the first place. Then HR would take ...


70

Reputation is everything, guard it jealously. Just because you are on the way out of this job doesn't mean the accusation ends with your notice period. An accusation this serious can haunt you throughout your industry, especially in some industries where connections are important, mobility is high, and people tend to circulate throughout the industry. ...


28

Should I respond to a sabotage accusation e-mail at work? You are serving your notice period and you say that you have done nothing wrong and are not responsible for the sabotage. If this is the case, I would not bother responding to the email. You gain nothing by engaging in a back and forth with your accuser during your last days. I would stay silent. ...


77

should I stay silent? Yes, if it doesn't involve you, don't get involved. There is no benefit to replying unless asked directly.


6

Maybe I should talk to my boss and try to convince him that people at C will learn that I left anyway? I think that is your best strategy. I suggest pointing out to your Company A boss that Company C people are going to see the update to your LinkedIn profile after you leave A. Claiming you are on sick leave is going to look really silly when your ...


5

I was in a similar situation once - I was employed by a parent company to work at a client company, and when I resigned my manager asked to say nothing, so the company I was body-shopped out to would stay happy. I did what my employer asked. I stayed in contact with some of my ex colleagues from the client company, and when they found out that I didn't work ...


10

Short answer: Don't lie. Longer answer: Your professional reputation has value If you participate in this fraud, and yes, it is fraud, by "Company A", you will be in the very least tarnishing yourself as being a liar, untrustworthy, and unprofessional. You could expose yourself to legal troubles IANAL and you should check with one as depending on the ...


6

You absolutely should tell the HR representative at your new company the situation. If they believe you are still working, they might not be in a particular rush to get things finalized for your work permit. Hopefully, they can expedite the process. Never lie to a potential employer. Although it probably wouldnt hurt you if they found out, at the very ...


1

Start looking for a new job if this one is not a good fit. From what you're saying, you don't want to continue in this job anymore so do it now - don't waste your and your company's time. Either way I’m concerned that if I leave the job before reaching a year there it will look bad on my resume. Not if you tell the interviewer that it was not a good fit ...


1

Start looking now. There's no reason not to start looking, get some feelers out with recruiters, and plan to change your career come the new year. Depending on your location and specific industry background, it could take a few months to find something decent. Unless you are going through a clearance process, there's no reason to include the job on your ...


6

This really doesn’t sound like “exploitation” to me: it just sounds like you weren’t a good fit for the position. They hired you for your career experience, but you refused to share it with their other employees either directly or by knowledge transfer. As a result, you were poorly thought of. You reacted by blaming others and complaining to upper management....


0

When I move to another company, I need to provide this manager's reference. How much would this manager's feedback affect me at my new job? It depends on many factors, particularly (1) what exactly your manager says/writes in your reference and (2) how much importance your next employer gives to the contents of this reference. Don't worry about things ...


1

I am going to assume there is an actual NDA that you are adhering to. 1) When I shift to another organization, I've to give reference of this manager. How much this manager's feedback will affect my new job? If you need a reference from your previous employer, and they reflect on your uncooperative behavior (whether it be justifiable or not), it's ...


2

A note as a person involved in the recruitment process looking for people who make their passion their profession. At our company, we count experience in years. A year (usually) has 365 days. Each day has 24 hours. We assume one year's experience means that someone slept 8 hours a day and worked full time during the remaining 16 hours, for 365 days. This ...


42

Does doing double job counts as double experience? TL;DR - No. To elaborate, in most of the cases, the required year of experience is required to measure the exposure of someone into different phases / scopes / activities / responsibilities of the job, not only the amount of time spend doing the same thing. For example, a software / IT professional with 5-...


9

I don't think there's a right or wrong here. I'd certainly apply for the job and in the application make sure they know that your company OK'd you working two places at once. Just list your jobs as they are and don't list a "accumulated work experience", then they can make the decision of how they want it to count. Keep in mind that 2+ years usually doesn'...


0

You have nothing to gain from being hard-nosed in an exit interview. After all, you are leaving this company behind. Their problems cease being your problems the moment you say "goodbye." You want to (1) work in a company with a stronger in-house team, and you want to (2) work on different types of products. Those are perfectly good and common reasons to ...


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