New answers tagged

1

If you haven't expressed that you're really, really interested in the other department, now is the time to do it. The fact that you're citing "getting back to my [current] boss" is a concern means that you can't trust the organization as a whole to act discretely. In that case, it's better to not say anything about leaving. Just say you would be ...


4

You can't. Send a polite email to the manager reminding him of your interest in working for him, but don't make any demands or "now or never" ultimatums. Then start your external job search. If you get an external offer before the internal one comes through then take it. Their loss.


3

Talk to your direct manager. Make it clear to them that you're not enjoying your current job and are interested in an internal transfer to a specific department, they should be able to help facilitate this process. It would normally be in the company's (and hence your manager's) interest to transfer a good employee internally vs losing them. Don't set any ...


1

Programming is a craft. You need to learn this early. What you are doing is education, and for programming, it is a required first step. What you need to be employed is skill. Skill is the ability to avoid mistakes and produce good products. To develop skill, there is only one path: practice. So to "get into" programming, learn and practice. I ...


1

For better or worse, many contributors on this list are software related. Fortunately: If you are a programmer, your question is like asking "How do I find the sun on a cloudless day?" Look up and to the left at the "jobs" button on stackoverflow. There are always at least 100 companies desperate to hire programmers, with no concern for ...


0

See How do I resign gracefully from a professional job? for a general guide on resigning, what to do and what not to do. From that answer, Attend and give light feedback in your exit interview, but don’t burn bridges by getting too stroppy, they are not going to change anything based on your feedback. See How much should I say in an exit interview?. Do not ...


5

First, you're worried about entirely the wrong thing. The exit interview is irrelevant for all your goals. What matters is your notice period. From the moment you tell them you are leaving, all your priorities (and those of your team) completely change. Right now the bus factor is 1 -- you get hit by a bus, the project is dead. But you're not getting hit by ...


8

How do I handle the exit interview and not burn bridges? Don't bring up anything negative, or anything at all. I'm worried this will just nuke any chance of a good reference You're looking at this wrong, from a perspective of weakness. But you're not in a weak position, they have a bus factor of 1 and no leverage since you're leaving. Alienating you is ...


2

Help my coworkers via a candid exit interview that spells out "the problem isn't perks or pep talks or more time off: we need more money to pay rent and buy food" You won't be helping anyone if you do that. If they had been interested in getting good feedback, they would have asked all their existing employees already. The only thing that might ...


12

You've already accepted the new job so all you can do at this point is hand in your official resignation. Work your required notice period. Do the best you can to document/handover the most critical parts of your project and make your colleagues' jobs as least-bad as you can when you're gone. Take any crap they throw at you with the utmost professionalism. ...


1

From my own personal experience, it is never a good idea to go back to an employer after you have left. I did it twice, and neither case ended well. Initially things will go great, but sooner or later you will feel the same frustration caused by the same issues as before. You also have no guarantee that you will not be under the toxic manager again in ...


4

They might also change the boss but not guaranteed. Do not go back unless that part is stipulated in your contract. You said it yourself. You felt he was a bad boss and he was creating a toxic environment. Why would you want to go back to that? If you're going to accept a pay cut, make it count. I get the feeling that they only hinted at the possibility ...


1

Which job to take, is your choice. You know the pros and cons, weigh them and take the decision. However, to answer your direct questions: Is a short work span of 5-6 months will look bad? If it's the only one, or rare one, then no. As a career choice, which carries more weight team lead path or the senior/principal engineer path?. I am okay with both. ...


-2

Your job contract is about developing iOS applications, but they are now moving your to a new Facebook platform. You are of course not obligated developing new Facebook apps for the company. all good legally? Or is the title on my contract binding? I live in The Netherlands, Europe. Probably not because you came to the company with the expectation of ...


2

But just or the sake of curiosity, ig I got hired to do one job, (my title on the contract say "iOS Developer", not mobile developer), can a company force me to move to work on another language/platform? So, are you still developing apps for iOS? Your job is not "Swift Developer", your job is "iOS developer". Yes, the company ...


16

A lot of employment contracts in the Netherlands have a phrase similar to "werknemer dient ook alle voorkomende en/of in redelijkheid op te dragen werkzaamheden te verrichten" ("employee must also perform all occurring and / or reasonably assigned activities."), which is a blanket statement that an employer can require - within reason - ...


-1

A contract defines the rights and responsibilities between each party and can be terminated at any point. Of course there will always be legal aspects that regulate the contract between the parties to one degree or another, but basically, if you don't like the company, you can quit, and if the company doesn't like you, they can fire you. If the termination ...


9

Your title of "Senior iOS Developer" is general enough that they can ask you to use Swift, React, or whatever other tool for iOS development that is available. As a developer you should be able to adapt to and use a different technology just like a carpenter can use a new or different technology to accomplish their goals. But the devil is in the ...


1

Is all good legally? Or the title on my contract is binding? I live in The Netherlands, Europe. Not sure about the laws there but it could be. If you have a contract that you are to maintain an iOS app and within a specific language, then yes, that is something that is legally binding. If there is such language in the contract, I would bring it up ...


1

This is going to hinge on whether the change from programming in one language to another is a "substantial change to your job description". This is key because some changes to your job are allowed, and some are not. For example you can't be hired as a developer and made to spend all your time cleaning toilets. If you are in doubt you would need to ...


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