New answers tagged

28

Can I get a "Hell no!" ? Using other solid offers as negotiation capital isn't bad in of itself - and while the individual(s) your interviewing may well understand what you're doing and may well even have done the same themselves in similar situations you aren't just interacting with them as individuals but as representatives of the interviewing company. ...


9

There is likely nothing to gain from your transparency. They may take offense and rescind their offer. If you want more time, just say you need time to consider everything. Even better, say that you are expecting* another offer shortly and would like to make your decision after seeing all the results. *Note, here "expecting" is important. You will come ...


26

NO, you should not mention this to the interviewer Two points: The recruiter does not have anything to do with the knowledge about how you want to make a decision (negotiation in current organization or not), they don't need to know that. Just because an organization offered you the expected salary does not mean you are bound to accept the offer, there are ...


2

Two things: Learn from them. From the one who has excellent skills. But also from the one with a huge ego. What does he do differently than you? Can you copy it or adapt to your situation and/or personality? What works and what doesn't? Does he take risks and present his ideas even if they are not that good? Does he network a lot? Think about how you could ...


1

Basically he said, it will get better with time Yes it will. You're experiencing what the majority experience, a slow lead up to competence which comes with time and learning. You appear to have a great job because there isn't huge pressure to perform.


2

At a startup this early stage, the only thing that matters is the individuals you'll be working with. Focus only on them, and if you feel you'll work well together. Things like organisational structure and culture don't really exist yet. To the tiny extent they do, you'll have an instant and ongoing huge influence on them anyway when you join. For example,...


0

You are looking for big company processes and structures in a place that clearly is too small to have them. I work in a bigger company than the one you are describing and most of their processes are make it up as we go and violated on a daily basis. I had a job recently at one of the largest global IT companies and boy did they have processes. They had ...


2

You're handling this exactly right, by persevering in getting your issues addressed. Here's one suggestion. There's stuff you don't like about your present job. Describe some of that stuff, in general terms, and ask whether this other company has similar problems and how they might cope with them. Be vague about which company you're describing. For ...


3

If you can write good code in any language, you can write good code in any language. It is true that your experience with certain technologies will help you get on board with companies who are still using those technologies. Be advised that old technologies are still more common than you may at first have thought; my company's flagship product is coded in ...


0

What you've described doesn't sound like a "old technologies" problem. Old technologies are great - they're almost all I use and I've made a lot of money with them. Out of date stuff isn't the end of the world as long as you control the deployment environment, which this company seems like it does. The concern from me comes from point 5 - the Copying and ...


6

Given the information you provided, I'd definitely apply for the job. If you think you were a good fit for the department 2 years ago, you probably still are. If so, should I make reference to the fact they interviewed me before? The company has experienced a lot of growth in this time & the manager likely won't remember me as it was just under 2 ...


5

Usually, not much can go wrong with a simple and polite 'Thank you' - Email. You'll usually not burn any bridges, unless your mentor is some kind of jerk, and most people will see it as the polite way to handle things. If you want to stay in contact, mention it. Just accept it if your mentor decides otherwise.


8

Just summarising from comments to a delete answer: This is all about you being in a football team and your branch manager apparently hating football and making your life hard because of it. However, the football team is the creation of the company CEO. So the company CEO wants the team to succeed. Your branch manager tries hard to make you fail both in ...


0

Most devices (phones, robots, doorbells...) being manufactured now require a mix of mechanical, electronics, and software design. You have the skills and experience to work in a design group as the person who can talk to everyone and work on problems involving a mix of hardware and software issues.


1

In a comment, you mentioned being "biased towards machine learning as it is a hot topic and I have some academic knowledge already". Don't assume too much from the hot-topicness of ML. It's been a hot topic for long enough to build up a large group of ML-educated entry-level developers. That's not to say that you should dismiss the idea of retraining, but ...


4

Think of this as mid-career professional growth rather than a career restart in a new field. Your training and work experience are potentially very valuable to some employer. Try drafting a resume for yourself explaining how you are a great candidate for a ML job involving real world data. You are! Then search for job openings that interest you, and ...


1

You need, for applying to commercial / industrial companies, a much shorter document called a resumé. It typically has a section for each job you have held, including academic assistantships or postdocs. Each section should very briefly mention what you did and why. A potential employer wants to see things that will make you useful to them. Be aware that ...


0

Well done! Sometime you need to change your handle: Junior Provider is no longer correct. When you take on work with more responsibility, your client company should expect to pay your company more. Then, your company should pay you more. the work is harder. the consequences of mistakes on your part are higher. Those things are worth real money. If your ...


3

This should be between your company and the client. Inform your manager and let the 2 enter a dialogue over it. Your responsibility is not to discuss pay or anything else, just to do the assigned work. If the request was in writing then forward it to whoever handles the client.


1

Firstly - Hey, congrats! Nextly - unless your boss has a big 'C' next to your title (ie: they're part of the management team), he/she has no business telling you what is best for YOU. And even then, they still shouldn't be, haha. Anyway. You're in this for your own career, and nobody is going to stop you from going up there. Not even your current manager. ...


0

tl;dr You, sir, have nothing whatsoever to be ashamed of. No shame. Seriously. Always work yourself out of every job so you can take a new one. Next time you want to change jobs, ask the executive in charge of the new department for advice about how to tell your boss. You're early in your professional career and people you know are recruiting you to work ...


1

As a Recruiter, I would never hold such a reasonable explanation against a good potential hire. There are gaps in employment often times for logistical reasons and even if the gap is longer than a few months, I have hired many qualified people who were waiting for proper work authorization or experienced circumstances that interfered with continuous ...


12

As long as you have a good explanation for why you weren't working for that period (which you do) there shouldn't be an issue. It's 3/4 months - really not that much in the grand scheme of things, but do something constructive in that time period, don't waste the time off. Companies will like to see you've been proactive.


-4

In situation you described its not your period of not working can be an issue, but you being a new to the country with no local work history. Since you didn`t provide a country where you going, i will as this: Does, to your knowledge, local businesses tend to be more cautious with new immigrants?


8

If you're asking about this looking bad in the eyes of a future potential employer, it seems totally reasonable to be out of work for a few months while you move to a totally different country. I wouldn't expect anyone to hold this against you or consider it negative. If or when you start looking for work in your new location, your employment history on your ...


1

My advice would be: don't wait to get fired, but start right now with your job search and the preparation to said jobsearch learn something you'd like to do in the future. How about https://fast.ai for example? start making something yourself. Either work on open source projects or - what I as a hiring team lead find even more impressive - start a side ...


3

We have had a few similar questions : niche or obsolete skills, how can I find a new job, in a new field? The answer is generally to prepare yourself to look attractive to employers in the new field. Try to volunteer for some Open Source projects in your new field of interest, or at least crate a portfolio, put an app on GitHub, read lots of books, take ...


0

The A in MEAN stands for Angular, but Angular is not as popular now as it once was. Plus, there are two different flavors of it. If I were going to learn something new with a steep learning curve, I would learn React instead. It's more current. I guess that would make it MARN.


0

With that said, given my goal of being a jack-of-all-trades application developer, is it likely pursing will pigeonhole me into data science-adjacent pursuits, especially given my data engineering background? Or is it likely the experience will be transferrable? Probably neither. It seems unlikely you would be pigeonholed if you add machine learning ...


-1

If can't create your personal project, then look for open-source projects and contribute to them (in github, etc.). You can show how your work made valuable contributions in real software. Warning: you will have to invest some time in researching the culture of the project, what contributions they will value more, their coding style, reading the forum ...


3

I am ready to work for a different pay scale. How do I mention this in resume without sounding desperate? Do not mention this. It not only robs you of all negotiation strength, but also makes you look like a poor candidate by you are communicating that you are asking for a position that you don't deserve. Reserve the flexibility for future negotiations. ...


2

Nobody will know exactly what you did before. You will of course need to understand the language very well in your spare time. Stackoverflow would be a good resource. On your CV, simply state MEAN is one of your technology skills. It's not a lie. As long as you understand it well enough and able to pass technical tests, there won't be a problem.


0

A good way to prove to companies that you can work with the technology you claim to know but haven't used professionally yet is by creating an own personal project and showing it to them or by contributing to an open source project. The nice thing about the MEAN stack is that it is free software and designed for public web applications. So you could create ...


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