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2

Right of the bat I got to thinking: you work for you, not your boss. It's you who is investing time in exchange for money. As such, if you think your time is, essentially, wasted, why would you stay? I'm not suggesting you leave the company, I'm suggesting you force the issue of you become less valuable for any other opportunity in your area, whether or ...


2

the manager there doesn't want me to join any other team. In most companies, the key is that the manager of the other team must want you, and you want to move. Your manager doesn't want to lose you, but the company as a whole would rather you moved team than left for another company. If you want to move, talk to the manager of your target team and get him ...


1

Is your specialized skill set close enough to the skill set required for you to work on production code? If not, is your manager ok with sending you to a training class? It feels like he’s going to hit two birds with one stone to me. He gets to keep you for special research AND he gets an additional development resource as well. You also get to work on ...


2

As a first step this calls for a conversation, or maybe a series of conversations, with your manager. They should be private conversations, and you should ask your manager to allocate time for them, to reduce the chance of interruption. Tell him you can do more. Present the situation as a problem for the two of you to solve together. Tell him you want to ...


-2

Everything that you have explain is normal. and unfortunately, quite common. There is a hidden point in many programming roles (I would say, 7/10 job offers on linkedin) which is Most of programming jobs are not needed. It's real. Even among many senior programmers, most of the time they do nothing. Although, they should pretend that they are focused on a ...


1

No References in Job Application. How bad is it? Not bad, in my experience. The primary criteria is for you to get the interview and get the job is to have the required capabilities and knowledge for the job and match the requirements. For the background check and verification, the references are used. So, even if it's not directly mentioned in the CV, ...


3

It's a good idea to leave references off your resume Typically references are used in the final stages of the hiring process - and given that the CV is the thing that kicks off the first stages of the hiring process - it's not actually needed. If you're adhering to a 'two pages max' CV - then listing references is going to take up precious page real ...


4

How big of a deal is this in software development? Is ace-ing the coding interview enough to make up for this? Usually, references are used for Background Check purposes mostly. To judge the actual skills of a candidate, in Software Development, coding tests and interviews are more useful tools to find about that. Having a public repository or code ...


-4

Highly dependent on corporate culture Some jobs have never asked for references. Others wanted 5, but didn’t really contact them. Companies that really care about you fitting in will make a bigger deal of it than companies which care about technical skill. I’ve successfully used co-workers as references, people who I did contract work for as references, ...


1

You can always change direction, but if you move from something in which you have a lot of experience to something where you have much less, you may have to accept a lower salary for the first year or so. Don't remove anything from your CV, but do explain why you want to change. Your covering letter may be a good place for this, and expect to need to ...


0

Question: is there a way I can switch back to development with Python provided my experience? Yes, you can. If yes, what should I do? Should I remove testing experience from my resume? Not necessarily. Any experience you have, is going to be a plus for you (as you mentioned, they are from related fields of work). You need to find open positions which ...


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