New answers tagged

0

No way does your company have any right to your phone number. Let's say you'd been giving your colleague a ride to work every day for the past 2 years, and when you told that colleague you were quitting they insisted that you give them your car. "Because it's how I get to work, and everyone will expect me to show up to work everyday in this car." ...


0

I can't believe that anyone would agree to this. "We want you to make public your private phone number, so people can potentially call you 24/7." I believe the second word I said would've been "you" or "off".


7

I am sure there's a canonical question this should be a duplicate of, but the right answer is always: Get a firm written offer in hand from another company (after any negotiation of terms) Accept it, with a defined start date greater or equal to the notice you will provide in step 3 Notify your current direct manager and HR rep of what your last day at your ...


-1

I suggest offering a compromise. Let them give you one phone number, and this time it should be one of their own numbers. Include in your voicemail greeting "If this call is for my former employer [COMPANY] please call [NUMBER]." Use ringtone and similar features to make calls from your former clients silently go to voicemail, and have your phone ...


2

Obviously, your company should have provided you with – and, paid for – a separate phone. And today, "believe it or not," they actually can "manage to exclude you." Don't let any remaining minion within the organization tell you otherwise. "This is their headache, not yours."


1

No. By that logic, any personal property that you used for work purposes would become their property. If you regularly wore a particular shirt to client meetings, would they claim that the shirt was theirs because clients were expecting to see their employees wearing it? What about the car you drove to work every day? I've occasionally sent work-related ...


2

Your number is now your asset. Auction it for a reserve price more than the hassle of keeping it. That's business.


22

Technically speaking, phone numbers belong to the phone company. Your service contract with the telephone company gives you limited rights to use the number, but you do not own it (the phone company can reassign that number whenever they want). You signed the contract with the phone company, so the rights to use the number are yours alone. Your company ...


19

Your company does not own your phone number. If you used your personal phone number for business reasons, then your company does not have a right to take that number away from you. However, while I very much sympathize with you wanting to keep your phone number, please keep in mind that this phone number is somewhat tainted now. You've been using it in email ...


199

Does my company own my phone number? No, they don't. Nor do you need a lawyer and nor should this cost you a penny (assuming that you were a W2 employee). If they withhold your final pay, you just need to contact the Labor Department or the Labor Commissioner for your state and complain of wage theft. I would provide a link, but I don't know which state you'...


1

You can rephrase your question to: "The work I've been given to do is not challenging". That is very different. If it isn't challenging then do you have spare time, or are you bogged down with huge piles of meaninglessness? If it's the former, start making yourself invaluable. I certainly wouldn't give a new hire something critical to do until ...


3

You're asking the wrong question. What do you want to be? Having been in a somewhat similar situation, what I came back to is this: programming is what I've done for fun for the last 27 years. I like it and it comes naturally to me (with practice of course!). I am a programmer. Does that apply to you, or do you find you have to force yourself to like ...


1

IMHO, it wold be a smoother transition for you to move to full-stack developer Look this post up: Don`t know if link posting is allowed, if not remove it please https://blog.udacity.com/2014/12/front-end-vs-back-end-vs-full-stack-web-developers.html Choose the back-end tool/ framework and get acquainted with it. There is so much information on-line these ...


1

Do you have an advice on how I should prepare myself to suit the position? Pick a back-end language and database and start learning from tutorials and blogs. Find some open source projects to contribute to. Not sure what language you've done, but some back-end technologied may be easier to pick up depending - for example, experience with javascript would ...


1

Do you think I have to resort to restart my career from an entry-level position? That actually the most important question. We cannot answer that for you, because we do not know in detail what you know. However, consider this extreme example: you are the greatest guru in mobile applications. And you are sick of using computers, and you decide to become a ...


12

You've been there for three days. Three. Days. That's not enough time to get a complete picture of how the work is going to be - in the mean time there's lots to be positive about, the company is stable and if your coming into it on the back of an unpleasant and stressful environment then maybe a bit of an easier time is just what you need. Also if you were ...


3

In most jobs you'll spend most of your first week settling in, going through training and other slightly tedious things - you're rarely going to be stretched too far. Give it a few weeks (at least) and see if you're still feeling the same way. If you are, talk, to your manager and explain that you're not feeling very challenged.


1

Having made a verbal contract with a new employer, you should now proceed to honor that contract.


8

They'll be shuttering an entire line of business ... I've been disillusioned with the strategy this company has been taking Those are red flags for the business you're at. This job would offer me to change roles into something else entirely, it would have been a welcome change of pace. It seems like you had already made your decision, and that this ...


0

I wonder if and how it is possible to apply to position B. Presumably the internal job posting made this clear, whether it's an email to HR or a formal application in an ATS platform. In other words, you are overthinking this. If it's a good fit, apply to the role. Problem: Your manager might seek to replace you if you don't win the position Answer: If you ...


2

It's possible that this varies by country, and certainly varies by company, but often, when you are hired, your boss puts in time and energy getting you trained for the job they need done. If you try to leave that job before they've even got their money's worth, you burn bridges, even if it's at the same company. They then have to hire again, because the ...


2

Is there any point in reaching back out to her to understand if things can be picked back up from where they left off, or do I write this off assuming they weren't actually going to make me an offer? If you do nothing then the very real risk is that they won't contact you. Touching base has very little risk: They can ignore it; they can respond back ...


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