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4

The other answers are good for the literal question, but I'll take a different perspective and posit that a job description being so vague that you can't even confidently start the interview process is such a red flag that you should probably just skip over such jobs entirely. Usually, it means the truthful answer to So, what's the job? is We don't really ...


7

Most of the times, the best approach is just being straightforward. Follow whichever is applicable in the below order: If you have a contact number provided in the job listing, call them up and ask about the job description. If you have don't have a contact number, but a point-of-contact email ID, drop an email showing your interest and asking about the ...


48

Here's a no fuss straight forward approach: Hello, I saw the role regarding [job title], and am interested as it's in my area of expertise. I find that the duties of this role differ between companies, so can you give me more details on its scope? Thanks, Riku


1

Ask your professor to explain. That's her job. Some practical questions for you to consider: Why? Always why? Why does the HR professional need the information, who will use it, and what for? Where can an HR professional get a useful questionnaire to give to an industrial engineer? What kind of survey questions would be useful? Does the company have the ...


4

The "correct" answer is what your course (professor) says to be correct.* In practice, most of these categories overlap and there is no straightforward one-to-one mapping. Based on the scenario, scope and circumstances, it might change - so there's no universally correct answer, only what's applicable in a current setting. In case you feel you have a ...


0

You're unlikely to gain much sympathy from this group. Many of us started before CI was a thing. Our "CI" used to be two guys manually running tests for 3 weeks. Many of us have slowly automated these sorts of problems away over the course of years. It can be done, and it can be done at the grassroots level, but it's a slow process. Our small team set up ...


11

Reasonable in general? It is neccesary. Something you want to take on? Questionable. This is a combination of manual QA, DevOps, admin work, and trying to change a culture where devs commit with reckless abandon. Nobody cares about quality to the point where they can't even generate a build so they have designated you as digital janitor to clean it up. It ...


1

Are you the new hire? If so, it could be a rite of passage or form of hazing, so to speak. You get the bottom job and you build your way up if you stick around. My thought: this isn't something great. I'd just say it's probably a high turn over position if they stick you with this task. Most likely you're in this position because the other guy wants to do ...


5

It's perfectly reasonable to ask you or any other dev to be that person. It doesn't matter, if this task is annoying or frustrating, there are always tasks at work which fall into that category. It's also your chance to start implementing a CI environment. My suggestions: start with setting up a build server; if there isn't a actual build machine, you can ...


3

Firstly, in theory, this is reasonable to ask. Which is to say ensuring code quality needs to be the responsibility of someone. Ideally, of course, it needs to be the responsibility of everyone, but it seems like your company is screwed up, so they'll settle with "someone". In this case, you are "someone" and that's why you got chosen. My question is, ...


0

Yes, I have come across something similar I assume you use another version control than git My tip: Change it gradually. Deal with the worst things first. Typically people can be convinced to change


37

Do you think, that this is a reasonable thing to ask from a software engineer? Yes. You've been asked to drive and maintain quality of the software, it's perfectly in line of what is expected from a developer, even if thankless. Have you ever come across something similar? Many times. And what I did was take ownership of the quality and implement ...


1

This happened to me a few years ago when I was interviewing at a company. I was familiar with the job title and description of the work being advertised, but I suspected the narrative was inflated and not accurate. During the interview, when they asked me if I "had any questions for them", I asked if I could interview some of the people on the team I would ...


3

Interviewing is a two way street. Your best bet is to ask a lot of well thought out questions that give you the data information you need. Make a prioritized list of all the stuff that's important to you: compensation, commute, culture, benefits, technology, work hours, growth paths (money, skills & career), business outlook, location(s), etc. That's ...


1

That would be glassdoors, linkedid and similar pages where you can find reviews. Second thing is to ask for such thing during interviews. "Can you describe how the team is doing the machine learning?" "what type of sensor you are specializing in or in what fields/industries you are mostly participating?" If you are interested in part of the job ...


1

Make it clear that you want the role because of that technology, and ask questions about the technology in the interview, ask how they are using it, what they are hoping to achieve with that technology, how much time you’ll be spending using the technology day to day. If they can give you clear and in-depth answers, then you at least know that they know ...


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