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90

You need to remember that recruiters get paid a high percentage of their wages through commission. The recruiters job is to get you from just a CV, to interviewing and hopefully joining a company. 90% of the time, they are only there to try and fill a role that the prospective employer has open. If the recruiter is still in contact with you it is highly ...


74

My question is, what is the next step in this negotiation or is this where I decline the offer and walk away? If you are firm on what you require, and you believe they are firm on what they offering that doesn't meet your requirements, then it's time to walk away. If you think they still have room to improve, then state your requirements one more time, ...


63

This is quite normal practice in the UK, even if I never experienced it in the IT world. Many companies like Tesco and any of the supermarkets will do this. It may not have been properly explained to you as "withholding" might sound odd, you are paid in arrears with an outstanding week to be added at the end of employment, makes it easier for you at the ...


43

I can find no evidence that this is illegal or widely considered disreputable. Acas explicitly describes a practice that is almost identical: Working a 'week in hand': This means a worker receives their week's wage the week after it was earned. For example, if a worker begins a week's work on 1st January and is paid weekly, they would get paid for that ...


28

This is a terrible letter to send. Don't do it. It reads as deeply emotional, overdramatic, crying out for sympathy, while downplaying your own fault in vague terms. If I got a letter like that from someone I'd considered a new hire after HR had put a block on it, I would be thankful that I had dodged a bullet, because I'd assume that they would have ...


27

Yeah that's not really what I'd call normal - it's legal because they are essentially operating a payroll system where you work a week in hand. Normally where this in place it goes with weekly payroll, they are operating payroll monthly while also having a "week in hand" - That's highly unusual in salaried environments - it's done for the reasons they say ...


15

You said (in the comments) that you were not required to show them what you earned in your last job, but that you would not want to outright lie to them. It would be no lie to simply respond 'no' to their request for that Information. In my personal experience, a firm 'no' in response to a request for personal information is accepted in most situations. ...


15

Join your hands, close your eyes and repeat after me: Never hand out the notice and break the news until you have another confirmed offer sealed and settled in stone. The plan is to wait until the offer is firm before handing my resignation and breaking in my news Given that by saying "offer is firm" you mean the contract is signed, it's a good plan, ...


14

Keep interviewing until you have a signed offer that you're happy with. Worst case scenario is that you end up with several offers to choose from.


14

You should absolutely NOT send the letter you proposed. Outside of the fact it has numerous grammatical and formatting mistakes. It is absolutely not appropriate to send at this point. The decision was made not to higher you due to inconsistency with your resume. It does not really matter what the inconsistency was exactly, but a company does not ...


13

Would that be wise ? Maybe Would that be useful ? Unfortunately, no. As you can already tell from the category of the received messages, they are mostly blind attempt at communication and trying their "luck" at getting a response. They are not targeted communication, and anything you put in your note is not going to affect them, since they are not ...


13

You say the salary is $8k less than what you'd be happy with. You also seem enthusiastic about working for this company, so I'll assume it's a reputable one. Given that $8k is likely around 5-6% of the salary (assuming a tech role on the West coast), I see no reason why they wouldn't match your expectations. Is it possible to contact them (the hiring ...


12

First, recruiters generally get paid a percentage of the candidate's annual salary. The percentage itself is usually on a sliding scale: the higher the salary, the higher the percentage. Second, recruiters don't get paid if the candidate doesn't take the job. Obviously. Third, recruiters generally don't get paid until the candidate completes some amount ...


12

C experience will be a BIG plus for any future job applications. As stated by 520 it is most certainly not obsolete and along with C++ is the main path for low level programming. Even if you decide to go to higher level languages in the future, C/C++ will make your comp science and programming fundamentals incredibly strong. Lower Level -> Higher Level is ...


11

Think of it this way: the company is also investing equivalent (if not more) amount of time and effort interviewing you (and may others), so if they have no intention of hiring, this would be a loss for them, too. So, to answer: Is this now a common thing and is there anything I can do to recover costs from these companies ? No, this is not a common ...


11

Do the math. Figure out how many months you'd have to work at the increased pay to make up for the lost signing bonus. If you intend to stay at the company for at least that long, then it's worth it.


10

I've been in the UK job market for about 30 years (school/uni/work). This used to be relatively common, it's called Payment in Arrears As they say when you start you miss the first pay as you were paid a pay period behind (and if you were salaried that could be a month's pay) and got it after you left. Now usually this wasn't really an issue as everyone ...


10

I appreciate many of you will tell me to wait it out, but is it really worth doing so? Yes, it is really worth doing so. What you have now is a plan and plans change. You have waited this far, why not wait couple more days, to get rid of the problem in a final (i.e, deterministic) way? Assuming the worst case scenario, if the conditional offer is ...


9

You can request a police check yourself (for a fee). Such checks are commonly required for visas etc. It looks like for an Indian police check outside India you'll need to apply to the local Indian embassy/consulate. The document you receive will have the details of the charge against you, or if it says you are not known to the police (as you believe it ...


8

"At the time I stated my salary expectations, I didn't know what the market rate was but do know now." I assume that means that you now want more money than you initially stated. That's not good: they negotiated in good faith and now you are moving your target. That's your mistake, not theirs. Your options are Try to push for a higher salary. This may or ...


7

I have to ask the HR now to modify the DOB in the contract. I am already feeling so embarrassed to ask HR about it. You had to input an incorrect date because of a problem from their side. There's nothing for you to be embarrassed about. My question is do HR have to make a new contract and get the sign of my manager and director again or can this be ...


7

Considering C to be almost an obsolete technology now No it is most certainly not! C and it's younger brother C++ are the cornerstone of low-level software development. Pretty much anything that is seriously performance-sensitive is made in C/C++. The two are very similar languages, and there is nothing out there that can realistically replace C++ (which is ...


7

Should I let the recruiters from the other companies know I have additional time to respond to Company A's job offer? They already said they will make their offers on Thursday, so they should be preparing their offers and you should expect them by that day; I don't see what you would get by telling them company A gave you more time. Stepping a bit back ...


6

Yes it is possible for a firm to back out of an offer. This might be breach of contract, but notice the following points: There is usually an initial probationary period which can be terminated with notice of a week. If they cancel the offer more than a week before the planned starting date, then that is an end of it. (It might be argued that the week's ...


6

What I am wondering about is if I should keep this secret for company A during this summer, or if it’s fine to tell them if I’m asked about e.g. future positions. What advantage is there for you to keep it a secret? You've got a full time position confirmed after the internship with company A finishes, which is great. If they ask you about future positions, ...


6

How do I deal with this? As with any other negotiations, you decide what you need and what you want. If their offer is below what you need, you reject it. If necessary, you simply walk away and attempt to find a different employer who will give you what you need. If their offer is below what you want, you make a counter offer and hope for improvement. At ...


5

The answers here are pretty good but I did want to offer an alternative from my experience that could explain things. I have worked for a couple of IT consulting firms that appeared, from the outside, to have strange interviewing and hiring tactics. These tactics make more sense once you are on the inside. The first company never ever had a concrete open ...


5

While it would have been better if you stated a market rate initially, provided you are willing to accept some risk, you can still do so now. You've already explained the basic information, you just need to improve the presentation when stating it to the company, something such as: I was very pleased to receive your offer of [] position with []. While ...


5

"I'm not interested in talking about my old salary - I'm interested in whether this position would be a good opportunity for me and my growth, and whether I'd be a good fit for your company." HR wants to know your prior salary for two reasons: They want to make sure you're not someone who expects more than they are willing to pay for the position They want ...


5

Job Hopping Warning: This only applies to India. I had a discussion about this practice with an Indian colleague who is a team lead in India. Unfortunately it's common practice. The only way to get more salary is to take the best offer you can get and start job hunting again. People with few experience will switch jobs often. Sometimes you can negotiate a ...


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