172

No. You have already bumped them up by a significant percentage with your email; by going back on what you said a second time you will create one of two impressions - that you don't know what you actually want, or that you still won't be satisfied even if they give you more. Neither is good. Stick with the second offer, and if you really think you deserve ...


116

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


58

No way. You already asked for more. If I was the hiring manager and you asked again I would rescind your offer. You got a nice increase in salary. Be happy. Take the job and stop negotiating.


56

No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


56

It would show two things about you: 1- You are completely money driven and will jump ship at the first opportunity - hence you're a bad investment for the company 2- You don't think things through - hence you're a bad investment for the company You will very possibly find they rescind the offer.


51

Depending on your location, the probation period may work both ways, in which case it would be well within your rights to make use of it and leave your current employment for greener pastures (and twice the salary is indeed greener). You'll always have the option to resign according to the terms of your contract or local laws. Employers often like to use ...


31

For reasons, you can say something like Pursuing other career prospects outside of the company which is closer to my needs. You should not have to explain anything more. Would it be considered unethical? The fact that you are leaving during probation or you are quitting to go to a competitor may not be considered as unethical. However, you using ...


26

The other answers have it covered pretty well: no need unless you reach the interview stage. I just want to add that if anything goes wrong with your accepted job and you need to get back on the job market quickly then the applications currently in a pre-interview stage could be a lifesaver. It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with your selected job ...


17

Go for it! It’s not unusual to request a number of phone calls with potential colleagues or to visit a new workplace before accepting an offer. Talking to potential peers and managers is a very prudent step in your job search. Ask the recruiter or hiring manager to help you organize some phone calls with potential peers. Or, if you’re not relocating for the ...


10

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month I can promise you over the phone that you will get rich, famous and own your own set of Yachts. (And there are business models build on doing just that for money). But should you believe that and resign because of that? Probably not. I'm sure they only accept written statements (or would ...


10

You have two main concerns, it seems: Not burning any bridges. Not violating any ethical constraints. So here ya go: First off, don't violate any legal or contractual obligations. You didn't give a location, so we can't say if those exist for you. If you're in the United States and didn't sign a contract guaranteeing you'd work for X weeks, then you're ...


10

No, they won't. Unless hiring manager in A is buddies with the hiring manager in B, and they're both particularly psychotic, that's not gonna happen. It's possible but highly unlikely. Regardless, it's not a good idea to forward your other offer letters in this way. If you withheld, you would've gotten B's counter-offer, which would likely be less than A, ...


9

Can I show this offer letter in any future interviews or say that I'm currently working at this company? Yes you can. I wouldn't. What will be the downsides of doing so? If future interviewers know of this company, they will likely also know that it was a tiny, filthy company. They would likely wonder why you would accept an offer from such a company. ...


8

I don’t think it would make much difference one way or the other. If you decide to do it, I’d keep it short. Something like: I heard I’ll be interviewing with you next week. Look forward to seeing you again and learning more about the company!


7

Would they take it positively? This all depends on the individual, but based on my experience I would not recommend this. It makes you appear over eager, and perhaps even a bit desperate. The standard procedure is to wait for the interview first, and if it goes well then perhaps you reach out via linkedIn or the like. Furthermore, I would urge you to ...


7

During the interview process, nothing is private and everything is on the record. That's perhaps a slight exaggeration, especially when it comes to personal information, which may even be illegal to share beyond a certain point. And a "chat" you specifically asked for may be less on the record than an official interview (but still not private). Although it'...


7

IMHO you are being a little naive and you are not judging the situation and it’s potential for you correctly. Or you completely misunderstood what that company does and should be looking for completely different job in some highly specialized areas. Let me expand: If you are familiar with all those topics and you can skip all those trainings - that means ...


6

You've got the job - the "sales phase" is over. The employer probably doesn't need or want any follow up beyond potential on-boarding paperwork - which they'll give you directions for, as needed. There really isn't anything you need to do, other than stay attentive if they reach out and ask for anything. When I switch jobs, I take the time to make sure I'm ...


5

I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John? No. Why would you? It's completely irrelevant. You're looking for a job because you need to earn a living. That is the reason everyone takes a job. You are not unique in that respect. They don't need to know anything about your current financial situation. I got ...


5

Completely explore all the available options before committing to one, and choose the one that best aligns with your career goals. The recruiter did come back and acknowledge that I received an offer from another firm and knew that I mostly might be taking it, but was encouraging me to "STILL INTERVIEW" and meet the management about potential roles. It's ...


4

No, do not mention your financial situation to anyone. He's a former colleague and soon-to-be manager, not your wife. Don't worry about the rumours either, there's nothing you can do about that but treat it as a positive thing. Your former colleague wants to schedule an interview, so he already knows you're good for the team. Finally, you reek of ...


4

Let the quality of your work speak to justify your pay You get paid for the value you bring to the organization, and if your negotiations were in line with the budget set aside for the position by the organization. I am a software developer myself and trust me when it comes to negotiations, I have seen folks seriously undervalue themselves. Also, it's ...


4

I accidentally saw the salaries of their current employers with same position as me. I'm curious as to how this "accident" happened. I am curious what will happen if they found out we have big discrepancy in terms of salary? Your salary is none of their business and theirs is none of yours. Keep it to yourself. If they discover what your salary is ...


4

My advice to you is to ignore any potential confusion of the past and instead look at the employment conditions offer, and you should decide on this. Hiring can be a messy business, and yes, often people will be considered for different roles. I think provided that they showed you respect, that's the most important thing when it comes to the process itself. ...


4

Should I accept company A back instead? That would be my recommendation. What is the intention for company A to counter offer me since I already "betrayed" company A by switching to company B Exactly what your manager said: Team valued my potential and willing to learn attitude.


4

No. If they respond to wanting an interview, then let them know you have accepted another offer.


4

From your question it sounds like you have made no formal commitment to company A. They made a conditional commitment to you pending a long background check. If that's true, you can call and say you've decided to accept the offer from company B instead. If they ask why, tell them: "I need to get to work and they told me I can start on xxxx date." Or you ...


3

No, don’t send uninvited communications to your interviewer before the interview. You may also want to let your recruiter know that you’re aquatinted with your expected interviewer - your existing relationship may be a reason to find a new interviewer. Many organizations have developed healthy and strong recruiting processes designed to limit bias and ...


3

In some places, part of the "interview process" is to meet the team you will be working with. This gives them chance to see you and you them. They can ask better technical questions and, when I had one like that, it had less "pressure" but they felt it was more effective than the structured interview with the managers...


3

I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John? Would it look bad upon me? (He was my colleague then. But now he is manager) No, just wait until the recruiter or hiring manager asks for your salary expectations to even broach the salary conversation. Don't lowball yourself because you are desperate - you should ...


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