57

Since you mention: "I told her I'll sleep over it during the weekend and get back to her on the following week - which is today". First, talk to your boss. You should not getting into any discussion about "true feeling" or stuff, keep the conversation limited to informing about your decision. Have a meeting, inform about your decision ...


45

When resigning, it's always common courtesy to notify your boss in person (or at least video conference/phone call), and then send the formal e-mail afterwards for HR records. Note that if you have already decided to take the other job, then there's no need for a "conversation". You can simply thank her for the offer, tell her you've accepted ...


29

IF YOUR "COUNTER-OFFER" IS NOT IN WRITING, THEN YOU DON'T HAVE A COUNTER-OFFER! All this stuff about thinking about it over the weekend is probably a waste of time. If the second employer provides a written offer and your current employer has not, then take the new offer. I believe every HR department knows about the value of producing a concrete ...


14

Asking them to make a quick decision might work. It might not. What it does do is potentially speed up the process. The risk is that if they have many good candidates they see no harm is quickly saying no. Of course if you don't ask, and they take too long then you won't be able to use their offer in your decision process. I want to know if I should tell ...


11

No, you should not. Knowledge is power, as the old saying goes. So if your employer knows what you earned, he has an advantage in salary negotiations. If he knows which clauses you already accepted, he knows which you might accept again (even if you rather did not). So it is in your own interest to not disclose this. Also, even the contracts that don't have ...


10

Do not talk to your boss in any way that may indicate you could possibly leave soon, because you don't yet know if you'll leave soon. The usual advice is not to resign until you've signed your new contract. In your case this might fall through, so it's in your best interest to accept your current employer's offer (or ask for a bit more), exactly because you ...


8

California is at will. They can fire you instantly. However they tend not to do that- it makes people in the company upset. Its more normal that you give 2 weeks notice, and then they decide to just pay you to sit those 2 weeks if you're leaving to a competitor. But they're not forced to do that, just like you're not forced to give 2 weeks notice. It's ...


8

The likelihood of getting relocation depends very much on the industry. High-tech firms will often pay fresh graduates full relocation. Other industries where the demand is lower? Less likely but still possible. It won't hurt to ask. Only the most sensitive (or frankly insane) companies will give you a black mark for asking. How to ask? Just like you ask ...


7

It's not necessarily rude, but it is unusual. Companies usually aren't very flexible about this parameter. They have something specific in mind. If they offered a permanent contract, they want someone who will be there for the long term. But, you never know until you ask. You could phrase it something like, "Thank you for your offer. Unfortunately ...


7

You've already rejected the offer in a respectful manner. If that person insists, respond with a short and firm statement: Thank you again for the opportunity, but I'm not interested, and my decision is final. And stop responding to their emails after that - any further engagement from your side would just invite more negotiation from their side, which you'...


6

If you're in the US, today is Memorial Day (and in the UK, it's a bank holiday). That means that many people get today off, and when many people get the Monday off, they also take the preceding Friday off, and some people even take the preceding Thursday and Friday off to get a 5-day weekend. So if a manager/decision-maker is required to approve your ...


5

One of your contracts is confidental. You are not going to tell anything about that contract because it is confidential. First, you breech someone's confidence, which could get you into significant trouble. Second, the new company may do this as a test, where you are expected to refuse, and if you hand over the confidental contract, they know you are not ...


5

You said: The trial periods lasts 6 months. During that time, both sides can cancle the contract within two weeks Most sensible thing for you, then, is ask for a trial period. Then, two weeks before the better employment starts simply give your two weeks notice. If the company will ask why are you quitting, you can give some general reason like "I don'...


5

Is it rude to decline a permanent contract and make a counter offer for a fixed-term contract? It's never rude to tell the truth. It would be rude to not tell them and just quit after a few month. However, be prepared that they won't give you a time limited contract if you aren't working a McJob (so retail, burger joint, delivery driver etc). A large part ...


4

It entirely depends on the company whether they will or not. When I started right out of school in an entry level job with a large corporation, they provided relocation assistance - their headquarters was not in a top city, and they knew they were hiring right out of college so recruits didn't have deep pockets. Ask whatever HR person you've been put into ...


4

Stackoverflow Jobs has "Visa sponsor" and "Offers relocation" filters under the "Perks" category (the link includes both of these filters).


3

I don't think it is necessary to talk about your personal feeling. Or you could write one or two sentence like "I appreciate your offer but I consider that would be a better chance" it would be OK. Be professional, no more delay. Just direct send a mail ASAP, first let boss know, then send mail to HR after boss confirm he received.


3

Always remember your boss is not your friend. That doesn't mean they are your enemy, just not your friend. Your relationship, like most relationships in business, is partly cooperative and partly adversarial. During everyday work it is easy to focus on the cooperative bits and forget about the adversarial ones, but pay and conditions are intrinsically ...


3

You've already mentioned it and the very senior person most probably knows your situation. That's valuable information for people who are interested in employing you, but by stressing it too much you're risking being perceived as having unrealistic expectations. They expedited the process for you already, there's not so much they can do apart from that. I ...


2

Very simple, mention money. All you do is say "as much as you TRULY LOVE working with Steve", "unfortunately" you're not now able to work for that much As an example, say you are currently making 333. Simply reply Dear Steve, very unfortunately I'm already making 444. You know, with the demand currently I am getting a number of offers ...


2

I will let you know if I change my opinion, until then, please don't contact me about this matter again. I wish you best of luck in finding suitable candidates! It he then continues, you repeat this exact message once or twice, and then ignore him. You are still talking him to him, which he seems to interpret as sign you are not fully out of the door yet. ...


2

This job doesn't correspond to the direction you want to go in for the future, therefore you cannot take it. Since you already aren't interested in working for the person, there is little point in trying to keep your professional relations. Business is business, it should not affect your manager's emotions. This is why many companies have a human resources ...


2

Accept the offer Unless: it comes with a minimum time to work at the current company and/or changes the resignation period. Reason: you have not mentioned that the offer from the new company is in writing or (what you should wait for) accepted, signed and done. Reason2: it's not a counter offer -> unless they know you've got a written offer in hand. Why ...


1

1, Well 4 months is not a problem, it happens to I also have 4 months' experience in my profile. Guess what, no any problem! 2, In most of countries, background check only check the companies you input. They don't know the company not show in the CV, or the companies you didn't input. 3, But the point 2) is not always right, for example, in China, any ...


1

I don't think the background check company would tell their business partner. Because: If the background check company leak the information, then it would be challenged. Background check company they themselves emphasize privacy, they would not do anything hurt their reputation.


1

I can only guess here, as I am not associated with "First Advantage". But cashing in twice about the same work, sounds like a good thing (for "First Advantage"). However you never know what happens there and what agreements are in place. If you would be open to all parties, that you are currently comparing offers, this would be just fine. ...


1

it is still my responsibility to tell him I am not interested as I had previously expressed interest and I don't want to burn any bridges. Yes. In this case this is just common courtesy and being open and proactive will minimize any potential damage. It's easy enough: Hey boss, we discussed a potential job after my internship. I've given this some real ...


1

Given that you are looking for a polite, but decisive response, I'll add this option which is essentially a synthesis of several of above approaches: "Thank you for reaching out to me again. As mentioned in my last mail, I had deliberated your offer thoroughly. I have made my decision, and unfortunately will have to decline it." The word "...


1

"It's a well known company.... experience..." If it's that well-known of a company, it's probably run by executives using the same bait and switch / exploitative employment tactics as others like facbeook, google, microsoft at this point, etc. don't mislead yourself into taking a position for the experience. A job at Microsoft is still just a job, ...


1

For my understanding, you could do that in following scenario: You already finish the current interview, and you mention that for salary negotiation. You just tell the truth, for telling the interview you would like to compare two offers. So they can have a preparation before. You are obvious the best fit for the position, and don't mind your interviewer ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible