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23

I was encouraged by some people that I should always counter any offers with a higher one. In this case, would it be advisable to counter an job offer from a company? Only do so if you are not satisfied with the offer given. You say in comments that you are satisfied with it, given the position and your experience, and that it is on or above average, so I ...


11

Always act as if you are staying unless you are absolutely confident you will be leaving. There are many reasons something like that might fall through: Company runs out of money/hiring freeze Company can't get you the money for some reason Until you quit, you don't have confidence you won't be at your current employer for years You might have something ...


10

You just have to be professional about it and let company A know ASAP that you won't be joining them because you had an offer elsewhere which better matches your long term goals. No need to name company B in that communication. I'm sure a few bridges will be burned, but if you're at company B for the long term, it won't really matter.


8

I would say a month is normal. If you are in contact with the recruiter, this is a good sign, because if they didn't want to hire you, it would be easier for them to tell you or ghost you, and not waste valuable hours on someone they don't want to hire. The hold up could be due to a variety reasons. HR might be too busy to prepare the contracts. Managers ...


8

and I’m unsure the best way to approach the situation without looking like a complete liar It is too late for that since you already lied twice to your boss. At this point all you can do is apologize for your dishonesty when you hand your boss your resignation. In the future, if you are going to take time off for interviews and you have to give a reason, ...


8

Sorry, but I'm going to post a mean answer: they're likely slamming on the brakes due to your communication and attitude - and my guess is that they were hoping you wouldn't accept the offer. I mean, first up, try reading your question aloud exactly as you've written it. It doesn't communicate clearly, it wasn't proofread at all, and it basically screams a ...


7

As is already mentioned. Just ask. Make sure they understand that it is not a secret way of getting even more money. You are just thinking about the title. It could be though that it is coupled to you salary. Many companies job titles (although this is probably cultural) are coupled to certain salary scales. So that could be a reason for them not to agree. ...


5

There is no way for us to know what they are thinking. In my opinion, you have shot yourself in the foot. You had a back and forth over salary, which you said neither party was happy. However, they still extended an offer to you. To which, you essentially denied the offer by your response. If I were the company, I would not hire you, as you are ...


5

You told them you were looking for a salary between $105 and $110. They offered you $108.50, which is $3.50 above what you indicated to them was your minimum. You could try and bump it up a bit, by couching the response in terms of extra commute or some other reconsidered "negative" to justify the extra money. You could even try for more than your original $...


5

A lot of the other answers would be more correct if you were a full time permanent employee, but as you have a 6 month contract, your boss is not entitled to expect your loyalty, especially if they have not yet offered you an extension with 4 weeks left on your current contract. You don't have any obligation to explain why you do not want to extend your ...


4

You have no formal offer from company A. Even if you did, letting them know as soon as possible is the right thing to do. You can outline the facts: your salary, benefits, and responsibilities are better at company B. Please keep your opinion about company B being better than A to yourself. If they are a reasonable company, then you will not be ...


4

My questions are: Is this cause for concern with the delay? There should never be cause for concern as long as you are still actively job searching. This is only one out of many possible opportunities and for some companies the hiring process takes time even if they are extremely interested in the candidate. Just be patient with this potential offer, ...


4

At what point should I stop thinking about this role and just assume that an offer won't be coming? In other words, what's a normal amount of time to wait? Immediately after you've finished the interview. You list a whole bunch of guesses as to what this might mean about the internal properties of the company. None of that stuff is your problem, it's ...


4

This seems odd. They have a post to fill, perhaps due to someone leaving and this loses any opportunity for a "handover". If you are currently employed and have to give notice then that will extend the possible start date as well. How you handle this is down to you, you could be prepared to stay in your current role. Or you could say to the recruiter that ...


4

Of course you may negotiate your job title. Generally, it costs your future employer nothing to give you a title that reflects your level of responsibility. You certainly should ask. If you'll deal with customers or the public, or submit papers to journals, a "higher" title can help your credibility. That's why banks have so many vice presidents. Be ...


3

I'm concerned that it's going to look bad if I sign a new contract (even one of indefinite time) and then give them my resignation less than 4 weeks later. If your current company wants to give you a raise, they have business reasons for doing so. With at-will employment (and assuming that's what this is), both employer and employee assume the risk that ...


3

“Always” is rarely a good idea. If you are given an offer that you feel is too low to accept, counter offer with an amount that you feel is ok. Nothing to lose. If you are given an offer that is so good that you want it, don’t take risks. If you have one offer that you feel is safe: make a counter offer for all offers that you feel are less good. Same ...


3

If he told you he would arrange a first interview with HR for two weeks ago, it is legitimate to reply asking if he has done it or not. Just try to not make a big deal out of it. Since you already have his email contact, you can just write a line asking if he got the time to look into it or not, then thank him nicely for taking the time. Though it is not ...


2

shall I disclose the ongoing process of redundancy to these prospective employers? DEFINITELY NOT! That will be a huge leverage against you during the negotiations. Since you will lose your job anyway, you will have to settle for less - and your potential new employer will surely force you into it. I am technically still an employee So what? Most of the ...


2

If you're willing to risk the company retracting the offer and going with another candidate instead because they're unwilling to negotiate (or rather give in to your demands), go ahead. If you consider the offer a reasonable one and you're unwilling to take that risk (and it's a very real risk), accept the offer and work hard to gain a raise or promotion. ...


2

Whether one should always counter or push back may primarily depend on the business segment. I could imagine some lines of business where not countering is seen as weakness. If this is the case, one is probably best advised to follow the culture. In general though, the relationship-building between employer and employee starts during - and especially after -...


1

I suggest you take the offer. You then have 6 months to network, negotiate and also see if it's really where you want to live. There's a big difference between learning about a country or even visiting it, and living in one as a minority. Not taking the offer means you may never have the experience. Trying to double the offer is a risk and to me has little ...


1

(b) negotiate for a 12 months contract before accepting the offer? Highly unlikely to work, in my experience. Almost every company I have dealt with over the last two decades has only ever offered contracts of between 3 and 6 months. Because of the nature of the work, 90% of them subsequently offer extensions. The only way with this option is to do as @Bee ...


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