171

Indeed this is a big red flag. By requiring you to join them and quit your current job first, your position to negotiate any terms in that offer letter is significantly compromised. I would recommend refusing to join them before having a signed contract in hand.


119

They keep insisting that I give them my joining date with them. The way I see it from your statement: They are not asking you explicitly to resign from your current organization, they are asking you to provide them with a tentative date of joining them, that they can use in the offer letter. It's not very uncommon thing. Tell them you joining date will be (...


82

I'll go for the contrary answer: this may actually be a (stupid) miscommunication and not actually be a red flag. Don't get me wrong: if they're asking you to quit your current job and only then get an offer - yeah, that's a terrible idea. But from your question, they're insisting on simply knowing your joining date - or when you'd be able to start. ...


13

I would advise not doing so, at least not publicly. It might make you feel better but it only makes you look negative. Basically it would look like you're whinging about them not hiring you. (I am not saying you are but that's how it might look) Would hitting back really make you feel better? I would suggest trying to view it as a positive. You put time ...


11

With no mention on my resume of not having passed the jury yet. I rarely got asked about it and never brought it up myself. So you put the degree on your resume without actually mentioning the trifling detail that you hadn't actually finished it? Well, I can't possibly see how that would come back to bite you in ass.. Now they're asking for a bunch of ...


6

Is it normal for headhunters to ask for written confirmation that candidate is pulling out of other interview processes before giving offer letter? Not at all, ant it might even be illegal. It goes against the concept of a free-market (the jobs market, that is). You might want to beat them with their own weapons: As per your request, I hereby guarantee ...


5

On the call they asked me if I was happy with the salary, and asked about the start date which will be confirmed after the pre employment checks as it depended on how long it would take.. I would give it more time. She already stated that the date will be established once the checks are done. You say it's been less than a week since the call, and that she ...


5

First of all this seems to be illegal if you are anywhere in Europe. You can't get the contract after you join a company. You should get this clarified since one possible interpretation is that they want you to join them, that is to have some kind of confirmation that you will join them, before actually sending you a contract. I had once a company refusing ...


4

One of their employees, who is senior in the company, has reached out to me to ask to come to my university campus to sell their consultancy to my university society members. I did not say no yet. Why would they approach you? Does this require your permission? Wouldn't this be something he/she would approach the university about to get permission? ...


4

What you learned is that you should interview with more than one company. This large consultancy obviously doesn't believe that you are the right person for them to employ. Not informing you is a bit on the rude side, but not unusually bad. When you talked to a senior employee who asked you to do some work for them, that's when you should have told him. ...


4

Your desired outcome is to compare both offers and take the one you like best. So yes, I would mention to the second company “I have an offer in hand from another company. I’ve really liked our discussions, however, and was wondering when I might hear about an offer from you.” They will then accelerate as possible/desired on their end. I would then also ...


4

If I apply there, they definitely would consult their incubated company which I know they do and would have to face this company. That would require a higher level of HR organizational skill than most places have, so unless the company is small enough for them to go ask the relevant people personally, don't worry about it. My friend worked at a major ...


4

Should I ask about my application status before sharing the documents? Yes, obviously. You need to ensure that you are in touch with the correct point of contact and not being scammed somehow. Do not share any personal information until you can confirm that it is about a legit job offer and not a scam. what is a suitable way to ask them? Be direct and ...


3

I now got invited to the last rounds by two other companies offering the same or better conditions I'd continue on with these offers as if the other company's offer never occurred. Until you get a written offer and a signature could you consider it valid. and I'm not sure whether the process at the company described above was a red flag or not. It's ...


3

A "promise" of a contract is not a contract. If you have not signed anything, you are not bound by any contract. You only hurried to provide the verbal confirmation, because of the immediate joining date they provided. As I was in several other recruitment processes I asked for a few days to make up my mind. They told me they needed my decision by Friday ...


3

A couple of observations about your situation. "Infrastructure coordinator" can also mean Dev Ops. That field has plenty of software engineering involved with it. And, it's a fabulous opportunity to learn about how things really work, both in software and in your company. With respect, your dislike of it may be unjustified. Dev Ops people are in strong ...


3

Partial disclosure is called for. You want to accelerate A's response, so you tell them you have other offers and you'd very much like a reply by date X. If you haven't got a reply by date X, then if you need to turn down the offer from B, then do so. But you don't need to offer to A the information that you've done so, nor that you have no other offers ...


3

If I accept the second job offer, should I tell the new company that I accepted an offer before? No, assuming you don't have to delay your start at the second company due to obligations at the first. Will they be able to find out by conducting a background check? Probably not. It's not clear how much they would care anyway.


2

To be on the safe side, clarify with the company what does "join" mean. Commit to absolutely nothing before you have a written offer from them. Based in the said offer, make your decisions. There is a similar question here.


2

If you want to join the second company, I would suggest you write an email to the HR of the first company politely stating that you won't be able to join them due to so and so reason. And I don't think the second company will come to know anything in the background check. Thank you.


1

Don't leave a job unless you've got something better to go to. (some jobs are so bad that being unemployed may be better, but this doesn't apply to you) Tell your boss that you would be happy to accept his offer, and would like more development if it becomes available but in the meantime you're interested in learning any aspect of the industry that you can. ...


1

Rushing a decision may not be in your best interests, and that is across the board. In your case, you can rush Company A, by telling them that you have another offer on the table with a deadline, which is implicitly saying that no offer from them in that timeframe will end up with you going with Company B. If you are a big enough draw to Company A, and ...


1

Rhetorical question (something to consider and maybe try): What happens if your brother says to the recruiter that he has withdrawn from all other job searches, but then doesn't actually do that? The same way as the company can say "we will give you an offer if you do this" and then they can choose to not field an offer, or field a bad offer that would be ...


1

Unless you have absolutely no other options, realize that the red flags are seen for a reason, and tell them you can't accept under these conditions. Then, if they decide to give you an offer letter before joining, think long and hard about whether you still want to work for these people. They are effectively asking you to stop looking for a good position ...


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