17

No, never resign until you have a formal, signed offer from your new employer. See many, many questions on this site for times it's gone wrong. he told me that he would be marking DOJ(Date of Joining) as 1 month after this call Get back in contact with the recruiter. Tell them you won't be joining until one month after you receive the offer letter.


9

"New employer want to verify that i am not working for any other employer." This is an unreasonable thing for them to want, as you obviously are currently working for another employer. Just tell your new employer that you don't want them talking to your old employer until after you have given notice. And remind them that you plan to give notice ...


8

Every month the company will take $4000, convert it to Indian Rupees at the bank used by the company (using their buy rate for that day) and transfer the result to your account. Purchasing Power Parity is not in any way involved. This is an absolutely normal way for a company to pay a salary to a worker in a country they don't have a big presence in. Be ...


8

If they're messing you around this much over providing a simple thing like an offer letter then it's not looking good - they might still come through but I think it's highly unlikely at this point. So sorry to say it but you need to resume your job-search (if you stopped that is) - if you want to stay at your existing position you probably want to talk to ...


7

Ask the questions now, both on the documents and the onboarding. There is no reason to wait for acknowledgement, you can assume that they received it and continue directly. By asking now, you put the ball in the company's court to follow up on this, and it shows pro-activeness. They should give you the information you asked about and you can continue as ...


7

You are discovering the difference between working in academia and industry. They told me that should not be saying anything about [the patent application] to others until they take an action. They said they do not need to be in a hurry because patents can not be guaranteed [granted?] to them in a few days, and it takes years. This is correct. Do what they ...


7

You definitely can and it is to your benefit to discuss raises with your current manager. However, don't bring other offers into the discussion. It has very low possibility to be taken positively. Most likely, it will be taken negatively. If you want to approach your manager for a raise, the best way to start a discussion is by showing your achievements and ...


5

I think you know what you want and therefore what you have to do. It's literally just business and if they invested 5 figures on you that is still is in probation period that's on them not you. Fear and dread are totally normal, the best decisions are sometimes the hardest.


5

If the new company asks you about the discrepancy, just point out that your description is actually correct: "rotating research analyst intern". Point out to them that the word "Intern" is still there as the main word. The only thing you did was to add some additional info. If the new company cannot understand that simple point of view, ...


5

It is not beneficial to you to think in terms of general "time of service before advancement". You cannot asses that at all and the mileage will vary significantly for all individuals with their unique circumstances in professional and personal life. You can however determine your situation by doing two main things. Negotiations with your current ...


4

After asking multiple times, I've been told that they have an "insurance marketplace" with several different providers, so they can't tell me amounts for the premiums. They won't provide current or future premiums for any of the plans available, or even ranges. Seems like this is one of these situations: The company is lazy and doesn't want to ...


3

So is it ever appropriate to ask about full-time compensation after receiving an internship offer? If you are thinking of asking "what is your starting salary for converted interns" than the answer is "no". You can (and should) ask about hiring policies for interns up front. Some companies do convert interns, others do not and that can ...


2

How do I secure a job offer from this company that I worked for two years during my master studies? ... Do I need to quit my job and start looking for a better job? Do not quit. (Yet.) Stop worrying about securing this position. Start job hunting. The first bit of advice is to never quit rashly just because something feels unfair; spite them instead by ...


2

You are doing this correctly. Don't quit your current job until you have a signed and counter-signed offer letter from the new company in hand. You also don't want your current employer to get wind that you're looking for a new job until you hand in your resignation. Say to the new employer that you are currently employed, but you will be quitting your ...


2

Every company who provides healthcare coverage to its employees knows exactly what it will cost the employee. The costs are built in to the selection process, how else would you choose? If "marketplace" means the US guaranteed insurance marketplace (healthcare.gov), then you will be paying the full cost, and it will be a lot. This is a bad ...


2

You supervisor can answer that question. I'm no fan of those "junior" and "senior" job titles, they are not often in use where I live. Basically every company can have their own definition what they call "junior" or "senior". Most of the time it boils down to experience and independence. A junior needs someone to check ...


2

Leaving a company is “just business” but make sure you fully understand the ramifications first as they absolutely will take it badly in this situation. Review your employment contract, it’s very common to have “you have to pay it back if you leave soon” clauses for expensive training. Also expect to be tossed out of the housing they are paying for with no ...


1

I've worked with some developers with more than 10 years experience who I considered still to be "junior". In my view, "junior" vs. "senior" is all about behavior and results vs. time on the job. In your organization, keep your eye on those who you consider to be "senior" and get to know them. Seek out a mentor who ...


1

It's entirely reasonable to want to know whether a company is merely offering some initial commercial experience in exchange for cheap labour, or is running a program to identify it's future junior hires. Something along the lines of following would indicate your interest in a permanent role without being presumptuous about your performance leading to an ...


1

This company has a dumb approach. I'm going to guess that you're probably working remotely and they're trying to prevent you from double-dipping. There's really no way for employer A to prove that you're no longer working for employer B without A (or a designee) directly contacting B. However, doing so may cause you undue stress in your ongoing situation ...


1

obvious discrimination here Maybe they are discriminating based on what you are (a woman), but maybe not. Discrimination based on who you are is common, and pretty much required if you want to run a successful business. The burden would be on you to prove it is the former and not the latter, and suing your way to a job is probably not a winning strategy, ...


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