140

It seems to me that you recognise the risk of rocking the boat. Do be aware, though, that the signals of saying nothing are not entirely benign. For example, if you kick up a fuss and you may seem like a troublemaker. If you say nothing then you may seem like a pushover, and find it harder to, say, push for promotion further down the line. Whatever ...


68

Just tell them that you will start two weeks later.


64

Actually, I just re-read the question. A 10% pay cut for the first two weeks. It's not as bad as I originally thought. My original answer was based on a much longer-lasting pay cut. Honestly, I don't think this is a battle worth fighting, especially if everyone partook in the same pay cut. I just find it suspicious that the pay cut is expiring, but that the ...


27

To me, it sounds like the recruiter missed the fact that your starting date was within the period of the pay cut due to Corona. This certainly qualifies as special circumstances, so I think it's at least possible this was an honest mistake. Now what do you hope to achieve by complaining at this point? If you're not looking for the money, what is the outcome ...


21

I have had great success in signing negotiations so that's where my POV comes from. Let me get this straight... they made everybody take a 10% pay cut but they spent thousands and thousands of dollars looking for a good hire and they found you but now you're supposed to take a 10% cut that they never mentioned? You would basically be paying for some of your ...


10

Don't complain about it. Just ask to be exempted from the pay cut, on the basis that your offer letter did not contain anything about it. You've agreed to what legally amounts to a contract, and an undisclosed pay cut means the other side is not fulfilling the contract in its entirety. Do not threaten to quit, and definitely don't silently quit. You don't ...


10

Without wanting to be too harsh, you seem to be making the same mistake here that a lot of other junior people make: all your reasons are based around the advantages to you, not the advantages to your potential employer. They've made the eminently reasonable decision to focus on staff who want to have a long term relationship with them, and you don't want to ...


8

They'll be shuttering an entire line of business ... I've been disillusioned with the strategy this company has been taking Those are red flags for the business you're at. This job would offer me to change roles into something else entirely, it would have been a welcome change of pace. It seems like you had already made your decision, and that this ...


7

I am sure there's a canonical question this should be a duplicate of, but the right answer is always: Get a firm written offer in hand from another company (after any negotiation of terms) Accept it, with a defined start date greater or equal to the notice you will provide in step 3 Notify your current direct manager and HR rep of what your last day at your ...


6

As a compromise between working a pay period and seeing what happens and refusing to work until you have a written offer, consider the following: Write up your understanding of pay rate, benefits, etc., all the terms you would expect in an offer letter. E-mail to your boss, saying "This is my understanding of the terms, please correct anything you ...


6

Basically it comes down to this: Do you think the company is scamming you? Like, it's someone who is not really a company but they say they are in order to run some scam like getting money from you or something. Given that you have already had 3 interviews with this company, do you feel they are legit? Rescheduling an interview twice when the interviewer ...


6

In my experience, it’s really difficult to up your pay grade beyond the standard yearly/twice-a-year time frame once you move in to a firm. Is money a major factor for you? Or working at A? You said you told x+8 to A already and are trying to figure how to get from A what B offered you - the optics seem greedy, but remember that you play for yourself. If ...


6

I somehow feel like I owe the client company at least a statement that I appreciate the interest You owe nothing, no direct interest was given. This isn't something to pursue third hand, you never know if there are agendas at play that you're not privy to. It can potentially blow up. The option of maintaining status quo will have positive effects and is ...


5

One thing that other answers haven't addressed is that many people are struggling due to working at home while having to potentially simultaneously home school their kids or provide child-care (or care for other family members that previously had care-workers or being under financial stress because their partner got laid off, etc, etc.). It seems quite ...


5

I have two pieces of advice. Don't assume the recruiter is being dishonest with you. You don't know this to be true. It sounds like it's start date dependent and it absolutely could be an honest mistake. Protect yourself. The biggest risk to you is that they could extend the paycuts for who knows how long. Two weeks is not a big deal as you should be ...


4

This is going to come off as extremely cynical and crass, but so be it. The fact of the matter is that companies play by their own rules, and you should too. If you mess up at work or you don't fit into the company politics or whatever, the company won't hesitate to fire you for whatever reason (especially in SF which is in a right-to-work state where there ...


4

Do it yourself. Ask lots of questions. Figure out your pay, probation period, vacation time, benefits, ask if they have an employee manual, etc. Then, email them, state that you've already started working for them, summarize what they've told you, throw in a couple of assumptions about paid vacation time/sick leave, the starting dates of your benefits, etc. ...


4

For me it would be entirely expected that the sum you're discussing with the HR is your regular salary. A pay cut that applies to all employees is a very temporary measure (it's just for two weeks!), so I don't see why it should not apply to you. Imagine that due to reduced workload, everyone on the team would get a PTO on Friday for the next two weeks. ...


3

Put yourself in the company’s shoes. What did they have to lose by disclosing the temporary pay cut in the offer letter? If they did and you were petty enough to turn it down for that reason, they’d have dodged a bullet. It seems more likely this was an honest mistake that’s embarrassing to the company. Turning the offer down now is not a signal that you’re ...


3

A few points: The older your degree, the less relevant it is. Once you are 3+ years into your career, your recent work experience and achievements far outweigh the academics by a wide margin It can be advantage for new grads. There isn't a whole of useful data in a resume that early in your career and all other things being equal the people sorting the ...


3

The fact that in my career I have run into only a handful of people who have a degree from an Ivy, I assume that people without a degree from an IVY league school have no problems finding jobs. I have also run into many employees who only have a degree from a community college, or a for-profit college. That means that they also can find jobs. While it is ...


3

Company A says their range would be 120 to 140, so you can expect 130. Company B offers 175. That's a huge difference. But then A is your "dream company". Think very hard about what makes them your "dream company". One third more salary would make B my dream company in a heartbeat.


2

Should I share my offer letter? If these companies were one of the FAANGUMLs then sharing the offer letter would be fine because these companies are used to competing with each other over talent, however since these are both smaller companies, I would not suggest sharing the offer letter with company A. The valley is small, people know each other, especially ...


2

With as long as the hiring process can take sometimes, and as many candidates as an employer often looks at, it's completely reasonable that the recruiter might have mentioned this to a few people but not others, or that he might not have even thought it was worth mentioning because the cut was about to expire anyway and he didn't think anyone would be hired ...


2

It sounds like this is partly an innocent bureacratic error but also partly a slippery slope mind game in terms of honesty and respect. In other words, it can be seen as the company's first move at seeing what kind of dishonesty and disrespect you'll tolerate from them. How about asking him to send you an updated offer letter to sign, which includes the ...


1

I would be cheerful, assume it's a mistake, and propose a solution: Dear ABC Thanks for your email of 1/2/3. The cut seems sensible in this climate, but given I hadn't been made aware of it in my offer letter, I propose I receive 90% salary for the first two weeks, but that I start my employment a day later. I hope that way the company saves the money it ...


1

What worries me in this question is the implications of you not being told. You went into this position without the knowledge of how Covid had affected the job you were applying for. The pandemic hit a lot of fields hard, but I know facets of the software industry thriving from the changes it forced. Not knowing about this hardship impacted your decision on ...


1

I don't know about law specifically, but this is most definitely not normal. I've never had or been offered a job without an offer letter in hand, in writing. I've had verbal offers that I have had to accept before receiving a formal offer letter, and then signing it was more of a formality, that has happened, but I've never not had the offer letter before ...


1

Never be weak Your instinct is 100000% correct. If the other party is dicking you around, in any way, you have to stand up for yourself. If you don't: you're always on the back foot in every future negotiation. Salary negotiations will go against you. Be reasonable At the same time, you've said that, in fact ... you pretty much really want the job in ...


1

It looks like there is not much you're losing by going to the in-person interview. In my experience, there is not much carrier advancement, being a "outsource" from placement company, you are always a resource. In your current state - no offer / contract - you are not losing anything, same job and some potential job if the company, that headhunted ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible