766

I know they have no legal right to keep me there, but they've been trying to guilt me into staying for the last few days despite my insistence that I want to leave on the date I gave them. How do I deal with this and get them to accept my decision? Accepting your decision is their problem, not yours. What if the situation were reversed? If they decided ...


394

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


270

To me... This is a simple choice. So basically the only reason you're hesitating is because you don't want to leave your team with all the work? It's going to be overloaded whether you're there or not. They can find a replacement for you but you may not find a replacement job offer that will almost double your salary in a very very long time. You're an ...


265

Is there really a salary formula out there? There's no one formula covering every company or industry. A particular company may have a formula, or more likely a set of ranges for each job level. And many HR departments subscribe to survey services which provide the "market data" that applies to them. But as I describe below, that doesn't really matter ...


227

How can I gracefully and professionally resign from this situation without causing a panic? You can resign as gracefully and professionally as you would have, had the senior-most team member not already resigned. The fact that these two events happened in close temporal proximity is not your fault, and should not be of much concern. Just be ...


224

Don't worry about it. Manager A thought highly enough of you to recommend you apply for Team B. You have nothing to apologize for regarding Team A. They only had one opening to fill and you may have come in a close second.


221

There's a simple rule. If you don't have a formal offer, you don't have a job. Take another job offer without any guilt. Don't worry about what he's thinking or how it makes him feel. It's business. He'll get over it. And if he takes it personally, you wouldn't really want to work with someone like that anyway. If they wanted you badly enough (and ...


206

I'm guessing they're mixing me up with somebody else. That certainly seems to be the case, unless you've been sitting on board of a charity without knowing about it. Is there any reason that I shouldn't take this job? Yes, the job offer is not for you, that's the solid reason why not to do it. It's not like I'm committing fraud or anything (it's the ...


204

Working as a teacher To explain to others, ".2" and ".4" refer to full-time equivalence (FTE). It is usually expressed as a fraction or percentage. A complete full-time position is 1.0 FTE or 100%. For teachers, the employer is the school district, not individual schools. This question makes it clear that it is a change of schools ...


204

When I joined I was told I can move around the company after 2 years...upper management blocked my transfer because "I've been doing a good job." Obviously they lied. Upper management is not only betraying you, but also undercutting your direct manager. There are two good reasons why you should leave your current position. Upper management is ...


197

No need to reply at all - you don't want this job (for good reasons) and they don't want to offer you a job (for dubious reasons, IMO). Just move on to the next opportunity and don't spend any more time on this one which is clearly not going anywhere. There's nothing to be gained on either side from continuing this conversation.


194

A business would not hesitate to terminate you if it was important for the business success. You should not hesitate to terminate the business if it's important for your success. The company is not family.


193

Note down as much detail as you can recall about the private call, and report it to the manager and HR of the company. Calling potential candidate privately is extremely unprofessional, not mentioning in your case it's actually pretty rude and rather naive. You should reconsider if you still want to be onboard with the company according to their response to ...


192

If it isn't in writing, it doesn't exist. If you don't see it in the written offer, by all means mention it. It is not impolite, it is being diligent and making sure all the terms agreed upon are met.


191

You already messed up. When you talked to the directors, you should have said "Joe is performing his duties quite well, I know we are not paying Joe what he should be paid based on his experience/skill level, can we give Joe a big raise?", and centered the discussion around that: Joe is doing his job well, and deserves to be compensated ...


190

You are absolutely right. Company A is trying to improve their odds at your expense, because if you drop everything else they can low-ball you and you'll be pressured to accept due to lack of alternatives. Definitely do not stop searching or drop anything until you have a signed offer. Perhaps even move company A a few steps down the list for trying this, ...


184

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


177

No. You have already bumped them up by a significant percentage with your email; by going back on what you said a second time you will create one of two impressions - that you don't know what you actually want, or that you still won't be satisfied even if they give you more. Neither is good. Stick with the second offer, and if you really think you deserve ...


174

If you really full fledged lied, you're probably hosed. If you just listed as having attended the university, you might be okay. The whole purpose of a background check is to verify that "this person did what they said they did". If the initial honesty check fails outright or raises any red flags, it is a bad sign for you in that the employer will be very ...


173

Indeed this is a big red flag. By requiring you to join them and quit your current job first, your position to negotiate any terms in that offer letter is significantly compromised. I would recommend refusing to join them before having a signed contract in hand.


173

I am sorry for the loss of your boyfriend. Regarding your job issue, there is no need for over-complication. Just contact them and tell them what you told us. Normal English language should do it. Explain how the situation is now different compared to the situation some time ago, when you discussed the last time. Let them know that you are now ready to ...


171

Is that too much to ask? Not at all, rather they should be providing you with the written offer, before you ask. DO NOT, I repeat, do not resign until you have a signed and sealed contract / offer in your hands. There can be many reasons why your former boss cannot show you the contract before you resign - and none of the reasons are reasonable. This is ...


169

It is not about whether it is unprofessional to start negotiating. They have already started renegotiating the position by changing the responsibilities. The only question is how you respond to this renegotiation. All the usual approaches to negotiation apply. Treat the situation as if you had been offered a new job with new responsibilities. You can ...


169

It can help. As a hiring manager I've often been in the situation of having a candidate I like, but the machinery of approvals and some upper manager who demands to 'chat with all candidates' but of course he's never available is getting in my way. In that case, if a candidate says they are considering another offer, it lets me: Set expectations with them ...


168

Your previous salary is strictly between you and your previous employer. And it's absolutely not needed for any salary negotiations: They should offer you as much as you are worth (to them). They shouldn't offer you less because you were not very good at negotiating in your previous job, they shouldn't offer you more because you got a really good deal in ...


166

One of the thresholds for stopping with a recruiter is are they honest, can they be trusted? Ask the recruiter if they understand/know what is wrong with providing code from your current employer (don't even mention about the legal implications). If they are dismissive about your question or do not see anything wrong with it, then I would recommend ...


162

It's good reason to smile, but not much more. You shouldn't stop searching for a job until you've accepted a written offer with no contingencies. A lot can happen between now and when (if?) you get that offer. They might hire someone else, they might cancel the opening, etc.


156

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Politely without committing to anything. Once you hand in your resignation they have no way of forcing anything. If they want to spend that time having meetings instead of preparing handover that isn't your problem.


151

Short answer: No. To start with, you are assuming the employer thinks you are more competent than you actually are. They have, however, tested you and know exactly on what ground you stand. Never try to guess what others are thinking, never. What if they know you are not exactly what they wanted but valued your character (they will pay extra attention to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible