204

When I joined I was told I can move around the company after 2 years...upper management blocked my transfer because "I've been doing a good job." Obviously they lied. Upper management is not only betraying you, but also undercutting your direct manager. There are two good reasons why you should leave your current position. Upper management is ...


191

You already messed up. When you talked to the directors, you should have said "Joe is performing his duties quite well, I know we are not paying Joe what he should be paid based on his experience/skill level, can we give Joe a big raise?", and centered the discussion around that: Joe is doing his job well, and deserves to be compensated ...


190

You are absolutely right. Company A is trying to improve their odds at your expense, because if you drop everything else they can low-ball you and you'll be pressured to accept due to lack of alternatives. Definitely do not stop searching or drop anything until you have a signed offer. Perhaps even move company A a few steps down the list for trying this, ...


169

It can help. As a hiring manager I've often been in the situation of having a candidate I like, but the machinery of approvals and some upper manager who demands to 'chat with all candidates' but of course he's never available is getting in my way. In that case, if a candidate says they are considering another offer, it lets me: Set expectations with them ...


144

I would suggest that you take this job immediately if it is the only job offer you have right now and if you are currently unemployed. The reason is that you don't know for sure when your next job offer may come. If possible, please stay with this company for at least 1 year to earn meaningful working experiences. You don't have to tell them that you don't ...


119

Is it wrong to entertain this company's offer? To my point of view, this company is acting Unethically. Going around a recruiter is not a professional nor ethical thing to do at all for a company. You are right to feel uncomfortable with this situation. Perhaps you can't get into legal trouble as you didn't sign anything, but this company may have signed ...


103

TLDR: NEVER ACCEPT A COUNTER OFFER: More nuanced answer: While there are exceptions, they are very very rare, and the odds are you won't be one of them. The accepted wisdom is that: 80% of people who accept counter offers are gone from that company within 6 months, at the 12 month mark that goes up to 90% More articles here, and here, and by US News and ...


103

An interview is a two-way road, where the organization evaluates the candidate and the candidate evaluates the organization and the opportunity. Having a bit of humor is good in a conversation, but not at the cost of clarity. If they cannot make it clear to you about your roles and responsibilities, that's a red flag. I'd probably do the same what you did.


93

I've seen many worse email names than Potatoe Brother. I wouldn't worry about it - if it's going to lose you an interview, then would you want to work with someone who has such a lack of humor anyway? Change the email name back. If the recruiter contacts you for a further interview, then feel free to drop it into the conversation. Otherwise, move on. And ...


88

After quite a few of these talks, I am a bit baffled that so many companies based in major > cities just act clueless about the costs of living They aren't clueless, instead they have and proceed with candidates who are willing to work for the 45-50k range. Many people house-share and do much longer commutes than 2h a day total. For those a studio ...


88

they give the option to work 4 days and then I could spend 1 day on my thesis. This is a very generous and reasonable offer from the company. That means it's a good company and hence you should really consider it thoroughly. It would be shame to let that one go, Although this sounds interesting, I think that one day a week would not be enough to finish my ...


87

Even if it isn't a scam. Even if it isn't against the law (which we don't know because the country isn't mentioned). There are still reasons why they would do this. They aren't good reasons, but they are reasons. They expect that people will accept a less desirable pay rate after they have worked there a few days, once they have already invested time in the ...


86

You mention this is a retail company. These rules make perfect sense for retail workers (though I personally consider them a bit onerous in any case - but certainly more reasonable in that light). An employee must NOT use their cell phone during work hours They don't want retail staff to be using their phone unless the employee is on a break because it looks ...


80

How could I go about asking my manager to match this? You generally don't. Counteroffers rarely work out (for a variety of reasons). "We just gave you a raise WTF sort of thing" That's your manager's problem not yours. Should this circumstance arise how should I go about handling this? You resign, serve your notice period well and leave. You ...


73

A company could not care less about why you need the money. If your rich aunt had a flat right next to their company and lend it to you rentfree, would you work there for 30k ? They have a budget for the position you apply for and they will stick to this budget, unless you can prove you will bring value in a way they did not think about when they opened the ...


71

The tricky part here is "what do you say to company A". You should continue your search until company A is fully committed, i.e. you have a written offer in hand. The question is: how to best communicate this to A without jeopardizing your offer? Some options. Lie. Say "sure I stopped all other applications" and then still pursue them. ...


64

The moment you told your current employer you had another offer, you got marked. You need to move now. They now know (or perceive) you as a non-loyal employee. I have to wait until March 2021. Huge red flag. They know that by then the other offer will be gone. If they wanted to pay you this much, if they thought you were worth it, they'd have done it ...


63

In my offer letter is says my salary is - "At a biweekly rate of $3,500.00 which annualizes to approximately $91,000.00" however, $3500 * 24 = $84,000. Am I missing something here? There are 26 biweekly periods, so 26 * $3,500 = $91,000. This is an understandable confusion. It seems to make sense to divide a monthly stated salary in half when ...


62

When my friend was leaving their job for another, and asked me the same question, it was very simple to answer - for me and for them. If money wasn't an issue, would you stay at your current job, or take the new job? Are you leaving because of money, or are you leaving for any other reason? For my friend the answer was "no" - they would take the ...


61

The only hard rule in business is that there are no hard rules. My suggestion is that you consider the new job and the counteroffer, and do what you think is best for you. I once accepted a counteroffer, and I do not regret having done so. My employer didn't start looking for replacements, there was no discussion about my loyalty, and I was pretty happy with ...


59

There is one place where you do not want to end up: The job offer expires or is withdrawn, and you end up staying with your current company in the same role. Personally, I never give notice until I have a start date my new company - so my maximally cautious advice while still holding a very faint glimmer of hope for a new position at your current company is ...


57

It might be worth reaching out, not because the display name is particularly outrageous (Letter #3), but because it's different than the name you used before. My concern isn't that they'll be offended, it's that they may assume it's not from you at all, that it might just get ignored since they don't recognize the name. Send an email to yourself to make ...


57

How to handle this? Reply to them with something like: Hello X. Upon further consideration I will not be able to accept this position. Thank you for your time throughout this process and please accept my apologies for any inconvenience that this may cause. Don't worry about the PC as it is meant for the position you applied to and not yourself ...


57

Since you mention: "I told her I'll sleep over it during the weekend and get back to her on the following week - which is today". First, talk to your boss. You should not getting into any discussion about "true feeling" or stuff, keep the conversation limited to informing about your decision. Have a meeting, inform about your decision ...


55

The first thing I'm going to point out that a question you asked a year ago was: How to tell my current employer that I'm leaving? In the answer that you accepted, it stressed that you should only let your employer know you were leaving after you have a signed offer in your hand. It pointed out very clearly, that there can be negative consequences, which ...


54

No, they will not agree to that, because even they can't predict what is going to happen. Your best course is to talk with the recruiter/hiring manager directly and try to get a feel for what is happening. Also, while many pre-COVID internships are being rescinded, I would expect that a company willing to offer one now expects to be able to keep their word....


52

This negotiation hasn't stalled. It has ended. Move forwards with any other options you have and forget about this until such time as they contact you again, if they ever do.


51

Does any of this ring alarm bells for anyone? Yes. Very much so. Your leadership is not behaving in a "ethical" manner. They darn well knew that you were severely underpaid, otherwise they wouldn't have counter offered that quickly. "guaranteed" bonus is NOT the same as base salary. Guarantees can be revoked and bonuses rules can change,...


49

They already know. Management doesn't know you have an offer on the table at this exact moment, but they know that seeking a transfer to another role is a sign of being dissatisfied in some way with your current position. They know that dissatisfaction will eventually lead to looking outside the company, and if they're smart, they will plan as if it's ...


45

mxyzplk's answer is spot on. Just adding more specifics: Would this be an advisable tactic? Definitely yes. There is significant potential benefit and really no harm or risk. Or would there be any consequences? I feel like this could be like a very mild case of extortion. That would be highly unlikely. As a hiring manager I would very much prefer be kept ...


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