New answers tagged

3

Some companies have a policy about hiring family members. They go beyond anti-nepotism rules. They are looking to avoid situations where having a close relative in the work place will cause a problem. It can even be an attempt to make sure that they are minimizing an insider threat. Two relatives who have to double check each others work might not be as ...


-1

Your post was way too long so I skipped to the end. Especially from your age, take the SysAdmin job. I'm 29 & 5 years into my career, and dude there's so much money to be had in our line of work for good people. That means so much more than just being able to code. You're paid in direct proportion to the difficulty of problem you solve, and coding only ...


1

You have to go with your gut. It’s a great labor market and those come and go. You sound bright talented and hard working. One advantage to the current company is that you have a great relationship with the boss. You can learn a lot about IT and life. Yes you have some growing up to do still. The disadvantage of the current company is who will be ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


0

Ask for more detailed job specs in writing before you waste your time with an interview. If they won't commit in writing, I assume they are not serious. If you don't get more detailed job specs in writing, that could also mean the recruiter (even if he is a valid recruiter with an actual job opening) may not know what he's doing, and the importance of ...


1

Having dealt with exactly the same issue but UK based, here's how I tackled it: Ask directly for a job specification (spec) or description. That document will generally be what the recruiter is summising in their emails and messages. Asking for that document is not rude. "Sorry there's no spec available". Then there's no job. Would you want to work for a ...


0

I'm surprised "or equivalent experience" isn't being used in the job posting, but the usual implication of "degree required" is that if you can demonstrate a significant amount of actual, and verifiable, work experience a degree isn't actually required. Will you be at a disadvantage? Yes. You have 3 years of total learning and doing. A person with a degree ...


2

Unless this new business is a direct competitor of your current business, I see no reason to be exceptionally secretive with the CEO. Twenty years is the better part of an entire career, and being a CTO is so far up the ladder that you may not ever have an opportunity like what you're getting. Be honest. Twenty years also sounds a lot like "I've grown a lot,...


3

Generally, I would ask recruiters that contact me in this manner for a job description. They should be able to provide that, without giving away specific details like the name of the company. Failing that, they should, at the very least, be able to provide some basic information about the position that would allow you to determine if it obviously a non-...


0

It could be a number of reasons, not all of which are red flags. I've encountered three distinct groups of situations. The best case is that the website and contact email could be handled by a third party, who defers all questions to the actual company. The person you emailed doesn't know the answer, but they instead schedule time with you to discuss ...


1

Just say so and explain the reason. You can say something like "after thinking about all of the details of the offer, I think the commute would be too difficult for me; I would be happy to accept the offer if I could work at the closer location, but unfortunately the farther location is too far for me". If it's a large company (based on your description, ...


-4

It can be uncomfortable declining a job offer; however, you can still respond professionally without giving personal reasons or burning any bridges at the company. This article gives a pretty in-depth explanation on how to do that, and it comes with an email template: https://learn.g2.com/how-to-decline-a-job-offer


4

Nobody other you can judge the value of the personal relationship you share with the CEO. 20 years is a long time to be associated with someone, at which point many personal and professional boundaries can blur. If you value the relation at a personal level, I would suggest to spend some time reflecting on your motivations and your CEO's plausible reactions ...


2

The standard practice is not to discuss with the current employer without a solid offer. What happens if your interview doesn't go good and they don't want to offer a job? The downside is that you will effectively ruin the relationship with the current employer. They might put you as risk and might withold salary increments and possibly looking for reasons ...


4

Based on your name and profile, I surmise your friend to be relocating countries and moving to UAE. If your friend is going for an international opportunity, obviously the company needs to see whether the friend has a valid passport for visa processing and travel, before they make the offer. So Here, they have asked for a scanned copy of the passport, ...


1

I’m currently looking for a job and I do not have a degree. I’ve asked a recruiter to help me find a job. According to him, he introduced me at a few places, which said the degree is a requirement, but I got an interview at some other places that had vacancies out asking for degrees. Will applying be a waste of time? Not always and you cannot know until ...


9

Yes I've been in software development for nearly 25 years, I left university (without a degree) as I got offered a graduate level job. I now have a senior leadership role in a blue chip. After getting experience, and working on both contract and full time, my lack of degree has been a question maybe 3 times, and an issue once (an employer who approached ...


5

If they want someone with COBOL, then apply - if they think you have what they want they will make exceptions... And if you are good in COBOL and that is what they need you're at the top of the list, so apply. Compared to a freshly graduated degree holder who may or may not have heard of COBOL you have useful experience.


17

It's worth applying. The worst that can happen is they don't look at your CV, but without applying you definitely won't get the job. Companies may put the degree requirement as a marker of "We expect you to be qualified to do X". Industry experience in the required area may be close enough for the job in question, that is up to the recruiter. Give yourself ...


2

Usually people have a job offer in hand and they go up to their boss and say, Hey look, I need a raise to X amount. The boss will say something like, Hey look, we can't give you that. You can try other places but I don't think you will do better. Then you say, Hey look, I actually did. I turn in my two weeks, see you later. Then the boss will say,...


0

As the others say, the contracts have a lot tot say about what you or the companies might be able to do so please do review that first. Is it possible to talk freely with your manager at Company A about this? There may be contracts that prevent him from hiring an employee from Company B under many conditions, but there are often ways to pay a fee to the ...


4

If you attempt to manipulate a current employer with an outstanding offer (your old offer isn't an outstanding offer), you can find yourself unemployed. It isn't uncommon to terminate an employee who tries using an offer to get a raise. For one thing, quite often an employee who's dissatisfied enough to go all the way through the interview process that they ...


2

Everything depends upon the contracts; Your employment contract (with B) and the staffing / outsourcing agreement between A and B. Because we (random strangers on the internet) cannot see either of these, and you only have access to one, the following advice needs to be treated carefully. TL;DR - Find out exactly what is behinf the problem of moving from B ...


4

Read your contract, make sure you fully understand what changes you are allowed to do and which ones are not (switching to a client, same client through a different sub, etc.) Your basic situation is problematic. You are an experienced worker. However A feels that the job doesn't require experience (as indicated by the new job offer). So you feel underpaid ...


18

I ended up turning the offer down a few months ago. You are late for negotiations, and don't have anything to walk away to. more than 3x what I currently make That could be due to higher cost of living etc in the new city/country, so fix upon some expected salary first. Is 2x good enough? 30%? anything over x? Is it available in your current location ...


0

Just lie to that recruiter that you have of course withdrawn your other applications. He is just a cheapskate who desperately needs the money he only gets if you sign a contract. The request is unfair and unreasonable, and imo very close to criminal coercion. So he cannot do anything about it if you lie That recruiter has no reasonable or legitimate way to ...


5

Consider doubling down If you get the question are you pursuing other positions? This should be translated as How do you present your position and what setting would you like negotiations to take place in? The answer should depend on your preferences: If you want to be flexible, show dedication, and allow for delays without losing credibility or ...


52

I worked previously as a recruiter including with a couple of staffing agencies. Yes, it is common practice for agency recruiters to request that you withdraw from any other positions, including to ask to be BCC'd on messages to those other opportunities/recruiters/hiring managers. They are trying to do everything they can to land the deal, which includes ...


6

If you wish to continue working with this shady recruiter then your next response should be something like: Hi Recruiter, Withdrawing my applications from elsewhere is not something I am comfortable doing unless I have signed an official offer letter from your client. I assure you that if I choose to sign your client's offer letter then I am not ...


53

Seems fishy. It could be incompetence or it could be malicious. Most likely it is an incompetent attempt at being malicious. You've got three choices: Politely ask for more details but make it clear that you will not cancel your job search until you have a clear and complete job offer. Cut ties with the recruiter. Send an email saying that you are no ...


378

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


32

This is really, really weird. Asking you to withdrawn from other companies is already a big red flag, but this mystery offer is even worst. You should demand to see the offer, as you have to consider a lot of things before accepting a job. Even so, you should really focus on getting into another job.


179

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


1

That company could be interviewing a number of people, they haven't decided yet, and they want to keep you available in case they decide that you're it. From your side, never assume that the decision has been made until after you have a written offer in your hands (email is acceptable). Until then, keep looking for other jobs, keep interviewing, behave as ...


7

Is there anything I can do to push for a contract? In that case, any suggestions? Perhaps I am overreacting and should be patient? Or has the company lost interest, decided to move on, and left me wondering? I suggest that (as mentioned in comments by Joe) try giving them a call this time, so you don't have to wait the email 'lag'. The time frame they gave ...


4

It depends on the reason you cannot go there anymore, whether you will burn bridges. I wouldn't suggest another person as a suitable replacement, however, as it is a common scam in some parts of the world to do exactly as you describe in order to get someone in who simply doesn't know what they are doing, or worse.


-4

No it will not unless you signed a contract. They should understand. If they do not understand, then they are a bad company, then you should be happy not working for them.


0

It is bad form, but worst that will happen is you'll burn bridges at company A. I assume the contract with company A contains a probation period that allows either side to terminate employment with zero notice.


2

Don't count your chickens before they hatch Since your application with B has not even progressed to the shortlisting stage yet, it doesn't make any sense to put A on hold. You don't even know how much time it could take before B gives you a final answer. You may end up alienating the recruiter from A, and they may even withdraw the offer if you don't ...


2

What would be a professional "in-between" response Your motivation here seems to be to thank the recruiter out of gratitude for having got your salary bumped. If so, you have 2 options: Reply I accept the offer on the initial mail (which may have other people in thread). Then, send another individual mail to the recruiter / call them to thank them for ...


9

Simply saying "I accept the offer" without thanking them seems a bit insensitive. Trust me, you won't hurt any feelings. "I accept the offer" is professional enough. If you really want to say something, say something like I am happy we managed to reach an agreement, I am looking forward to joining the team. On an unrelated note: You could also say $(x + 3*(...


2

I know, my entire interview performance was great and I am a good fit for the client, but how do I ask the contractor to give me a better pay than what I agreed initially without sounding greedy and rude? I think that at this point you already "played your cards". You already offered and even agreed on X salary. Asking now for X+n could be an inefficient ...


4

Generally speaking, your employer is not obligated to adjust your work schedule based on your hobbies or even another job. If you had this included in your contract, you might have some leverage, but you do not mention any such language. If travel to clients in other countries is a known part of the job (which it appears to be), it is not unreasonable for ...


0

"Still, I am in no position to leave until October 2020, as I am on a legally binding agreement with them to retain with them for 4 years (yes, the stupidest thing I have done in my life)." Is it reasonable/normal for someone in your job role to work abroad? This feels like a situation where you have to decide on a boundary and stick to it. We can't really ...


1

If I were in your place, below would be my course of action: Ask the other 3 coworkers if they are available and could cover me now by going. I would owe them one later. Ask the other 3 coworkers if I can swap with any of them in case any of them have a more preferable and convenient assignment. I would owe them one later. Check with Director if I can leave ...


9

It sounds like you work full-time with your current employer, and the lectures are not employer-sponsored (not part of your job). It's great that your employer has been accommodating of your lecture work in the past, but there is nothing that requires your manager and others to continue being accommodating. Here are some ideas of what you might consider: ...


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