New answers tagged

0

It doesn't seem unusual to me that tuition reimbursement isn't mentioned in an offer letter. At this point in my career, I've probably seen around a dozen offer letters (turned at least a couple down). Salary is always named. Vacation - if it is outside the normal allotment - will be listed in the letter. However, in my recollection, not a single offer ...


0

Often such a benefit may only become available once the candidate passes their probation period. It may also be subject to a certain period of continued employment during and after completion of studies done under such a benefit. Your best course of action would be to inquire about such a benefit with your boss or HR department. From there you should know ...


0

The initial interview is not the right time unless you are specifically asked a question about that., Once you start it's too late if they're not going to accommodate you, asking earlier also means the desk should be there day 1. The right time to ask is at the offer stage, ideally if they contact you to say they will be making an offer you could raise it ...


9

Many a times, companies do not list all the benefits as part of the offer letter, but as separate policy documents which they share separately (sometimes along with the offer letter, sometimes after you sign the offer letter but before you join, sometimes at the time of your joining). Depending on the size of the company, there could be separate policies ...


1

IMHO, Your only option is to get both letters in person, say to both you want to think about it and come home to think it over There may be subjective promises and "explanations" of particular offer details and options, but i wouldn`t rely on anything that is not in the letter itself


6

Both the companies deny sharing offer letter over email. They are asking me to be at their office to get offer letter. It's a commonly followed practise among mid-sized IT companies in India. It's apparent that neither of the companies want you to shop around using their offer letter for a better pay. In such cases, the candidate is typically handed the ...


2

Both the companies deny sharing offer letter over email. They are asking me to be at their office to get offer letter. Is there any catch? Is there any ways or techniques to ask them to share offer letter over mail? They've refused to send the offer letter by email. Is there a catch? Yes, they want to present you the offer letter in person, as they'...


1

You have to decide if you are willing to risk it. Will they get the funding? Will they keep their promise? You have to decide how long you will wait for the deals to be completed, and for them to increase your pay. If you don't like the situation, then negotiate. But realize that you may not get what you want, or they may even decide to move on to the ...


1

Only you can determine what your acceptable salary is. Do you believe you'd be happy making that much at that company? Or do you believe you'd be better off waiting and hoping to get more at a different company? Benefits also play into it. Get information on the health insurance offered, if any, along with vacation time. If you get 2 weeks of ...


2

I wouldn't advertise your age uninvited. Whether on a resume, a company profile, or elsewhere, adding your age is either going to be taken as cavalier or a reason to doubt your ability. Let your experience and reputation speak for itself. So long as you get the job done well and are respectful and collaborative with those around you, I don't think many ...


4

No. In the US in particular, it's illegal to ask the question. It's irrelevant to the job. You can either do the work, or not. The same could be asked of the 60 year old man who wonders "Should I tell them my age?" Because, after all, the stereotype is that older people can't keep up in the tech world, right? Prove you can do the work and no ...


11

Why would anyone care what your age was at work? They should be more concerned with your skill level relevant to the job. If you're under the impression that you will be judged unfairly if you tell them your age, then don't. If it's a concern, just don't talk about it. If someone else brings it up, tell them (it shouldn't be a secret) and then if they ...


1

It really depends on what the document says, but if it's not an employment contract, why are they having you sign? And what for? To me, it sounds more like a deceleration of intent. Moreover, unless Dutch labour laws changed dramatically since I emigrated some 20 years ago, you have a two month probation period in which both the employer and you can ...


1

Go to Juridisch Loket, they have free consultations every week. There you can get advice from a legal professional.


1

I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it. The potential employer even acknowledged it. The commonly accepted practice is that merely having an offer does not stop you from interviewing with others, but this is the dividing line: after you have accepted the offer and the potential employer acknowledged it, ...


3

There's a lot of subtlety in this subject, and some of it will vary with cultural or job-specific differences. That said, in general, the best rule of thumb is to actively pursue all options until you've made a firm contractual commitment to a new employer. On the one hand, until you've made a firm commitment, you never know what could happen - a "likely" ...


3

Yes. Doesn't hurt to at least talk. You owe nothing to either employer. Years ago I had interviewed at a job, and was told by a manager there that they liked me, but couldn't hire me until the owner returned from out of town. Since I did not have a firm offer in hand, I started work at another job. After a week, I got the offer, and he actually ...


0

Generally an offer is exactly that - an offer of employment subject to completing various other steps, until those steps are complete there would not be a binding agreement in place.


4

From your question it sounds like you have made no formal commitment to company A. They made a conditional commitment to you pending a long background check. If that's true, you can call and say you've decided to accept the offer from company B instead. If they ask why, tell them: "I need to get to work and they told me I can start on xxxx date." Or you ...


6

Completely explore all the available options before committing to one, and choose the one that best aligns with your career goals. The recruiter did come back and acknowledge that I received an offer from another firm and knew that I mostly might be taking it, but was encouraging me to "STILL INTERVIEW" and meet the management about potential roles. It's ...


2

It would be best if you could wait for your supervisor to come back from leave before starting any transfer process. If the other supervisor is keen on you, they should be prepared to wait. When your supervisor gets back, you should ask their permission as a sign of respect before engaging with the other supervisor with regards to a job switch. In a perfect ...


0

How do I tell my boss that I may consider this job that will be open soon? This is a two step process: Talk to the supervisor who informed / offered you about the role, and gather the requirements and / or prerequisites for the new role. Analyze the requirements and if you see yourself as a good fit, once your manager is back, invite them to a meeting and ...


3

Since I would have 4 weeks to starting the job, what are some good ways to stay in touch with the new employer ? Do I need to do any followup at in the 4 week duration ? There's usually no need for followup. If travelling, it's probably a good idea to let your new employer know that you won't be around the next 4 weeks, and give them the best way to ...


0

Staying in touch is not as important as being available to answer questions or fill out any additional forms that they forgot to tell you about. Hopefully you still have access to email. And hopefully you have a trusted person that has access to your snail mail and personal papers. HR might want a copy of your degree, your passport, or who knows what. In ...


0

Sometimes I've had lunch with future co-workers. I went on a bike ride once. Don't be a pest. Don't try to "start working". Enjoy some time off if you have it.


0

Depends on the job. For instance, I'm moving from an IT job into a ministry job. I accepted a call a couple months ago, and I'm FINALLY moving this weekend. I have been in contact virtually every weekend since, and have traveled there since to set things up. But my situation is perhaps different. I will be assuming leadership of an organization, and ...


6

You've got the job - the "sales phase" is over. The employer probably doesn't need or want any follow up beyond potential on-boarding paperwork - which they'll give you directions for, as needed. There really isn't anything you need to do, other than stay attentive if they reach out and ask for anything. When I switch jobs, I take the time to make sure I'm ...


3

The following applies to anything that has a price: Changing a price before the other side reacts is poor negotiation, but can be written off as a mistake. Changing a price after the other side agrees is an insult.


-1

I'm honestly not sure how realistic the idea of them rescinding the offer is. I would think that the worst case is that they simply say they won't meet the new demand. It depends on how urgently you need this job and if other offers are on the table. If you have some time, you could try getting an offer from another company for more and letting the first ...


-4

Other answers say “no” and I initially thought the same, but I’m going to suggest a slightly different approach. There is a way you could (note the emphasis on the conditional) get out of this with $50,000 (what you seem to be wanting now), but it will take more than just “oh sorry I changed my mind”. If you do that you’ll be crammed, and rightly so. ...


0

I wouldn’t do anything until you have a job offer in writing. You do not want to tell your manager you almost have another job. If a job offer comes your way then you have a decision to make. You will have to weigh the pluses and minuses of each position. I can’t help on which way to go. You have no control over when a job offer comes your way. Don’...


116

Should I email them now saying I accepted another offer? Since they are companies I have interest in, I might want to work with them in the future and want to find the best way to keep doors open. Yes! That is the most professional thing to do. You'll leave a good impression that may help you somewhere down the road. It takes just a few seconds ...


58

It would show two things about you: 1- You are completely money driven and will jump ship at the first opportunity - hence you're a bad investment for the company 2- You don't think things through - hence you're a bad investment for the company You will very possibly find they rescind the offer.


2

I had 2 interviews scheduled with Company B and C for next week, which I both cancelled by informing them I have accepted another offer in the meantime. It was good of you to be courteous by informing in advance. This potentially saved some work/time for the recruiter and interviewer. what do I do with companies D, E and F, which I have applied to, but ...


26

The other answers have it covered pretty well: no need unless you reach the interview stage. I just want to add that if anything goes wrong with your accepted job and you need to get back on the job market quickly then the applications currently in a pre-interview stage could be a lifesaver. It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with your selected job ...


4

No. If they respond to wanting an interview, then let them know you have accepted another offer.


60

No way. You already asked for more. If I was the hiring manager and you asked again I would rescind your offer. You got a nice increase in salary. Be happy. Take the job and stop negotiating.


57

No need. In normal business relationships it would be a common courtesy and appreciated as such, but for some reason most recruiters operate quite differently and are lacking even the most basic courtesy around communication. They won't bother with a "no thanks", so you don't need to bother either. If someone actually contacts you, you can simply reply ...


177

No. You have already bumped them up by a significant percentage with your email; by going back on what you said a second time you will create one of two impressions - that you don't know what you actually want, or that you still won't be satisfied even if they give you more. Neither is good. Stick with the second offer, and if you really think you deserve ...


0

Can I show this offer letter in any future interviews or say that I'm currently working at this company? IMO, you can use it for negotiating a new offer from another company as long as you don't lie about your tenure at the company or any other details. In the industry, not everyone knows every other company. Your offer letter from a smaller company, no ...


0

Ask yourself why you got hired. Is it because you're really good at your job, or is it because nobody wants to work there, and you might as well cite babysitter as previous work experience? Not actually speaking with a person face-to-face is a red flag, and should be a lesson for the future. If I were you, I'd forget that this company ever came into your ...


9

Can I show this offer letter in any future interviews or say that I'm currently working at this company? Yes you can. I wouldn't. What will be the downsides of doing so? If future interviewers know of this company, they will likely also know that it was a tiny, filthy company. They would likely wonder why you would accept an offer from such a company. ...


0

Don't lie.... And if they ask how long you worked there and you say 2 hours and the rest of the story comes out you will have made yourself look a bit silly. Will they then decide not to employ you? If you did that to me I would be looking at the other candidates who would look so much more sincere at that point.


4

Should I accept company A back instead? That would be my recommendation. What is the intention for company A to counter offer me since I already "betrayed" company A by switching to company B Exactly what your manager said: Team valued my potential and willing to learn attitude.


2

Well, you said company A is your dream job so I'd go with them. It's not about the money if both companies are offering the same amount. There's an old saying that if you ask for a certain price and the other guy says, 'yes' quickly then it means that you didn't ask for enough. Company A. must have been willing to pay you far more long before company B. ...


0

Until you have an offer, you don't have the job. I understand that when things go well, it's easy to think "This job is mine !", but something can always come up. Maybe you were great, but the next person they interviewed was even an even better fit. Maybe that person had an extra year of experience and that was made their decision. Maybe there's not another ...


4

My advice to you is to ignore any potential confusion of the past and instead look at the employment conditions offer, and you should decide on this. Hiring can be a messy business, and yes, often people will be considered for different roles. I think provided that they showed you respect, that's the most important thing when it comes to the process itself. ...


0

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month This is probably a red flag, although you need to get an opinion from someone who knows how things work in the part of the world where you are (India?). But, it looks to me that if they really wanted to send you an offer letter, they would not need a month. There's no plausible reason why ...


2

Can I resign without offer letter and only fitment letter? You can do whatever you want. I think the question you meant to ask is "Should I resign without offer letter and only fitment letter?" - To that, I would say no unless you're confident that you'll get the offer letter. Can they deny sending offer letter tomorrow? They can do whatever they want. ...


10

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month I can promise you over the phone that you will get rich, famous and own your own set of Yachts. (And there are business models build on doing just that for money). But should you believe that and resign because of that? Probably not. I'm sure they only accept written statements (or would ...


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