New answers tagged

1

Tell the backup company you need ten days to take care of personal business before you can give them an answer. It depends on the industry and level, but for professional jobs this is normal enough that if they cannot accommodate you then you have probably dodged a bullet.


0

In most western jurisdictions, companies can't force you to come and work (even during agreed notice period). What they can theoretically do is sue you for damages if you don't work the notice period. BUT, in reality it's almost impossible to prove damages and it's way too much work, so no company does that. The end effect is, even if you stop showing up, ...


2

You shouldn't say "Why are you desperate to hire me?" but it seems like you could ask more indirect questions. There are a few scenarios for a company being desperate to hire: maybe a lot of people are leaving, they have a lot of new projects coming up/already started, or they have big expansion plans. Some good, some bad reasons. You could ask why ...


2

Not necessarily a red flag. If they've recognized that you're more technically skilled than their interview team, they might feel there's no point in further interviews and they should just jump to the hiring process. This is a fairly good sign; if you have confidence that you're a fit for the position, you should also have confidence that the interviewers ...


3

“Would a pending offer make another employer less interested?” This seems very unlikely. I’ve even had potential employers ask me about other prospects. It helps them get a sense of how quickly they should be expected to move you through the process, should they decide to proceed. For hiring managers, this is an incredibly common ocurrence and it’s unlikely ...


11

If you have a pending offer, it is appropriate to mention that in the interview, and ask about their timeline. If they are very impressed with you, this allows them to speed up their process and perhaps get a competing offer to you. If you are just another option, they will likely not change their process, knowing they will lose you to another offer. If ...


2

The hiring process is like anything else, it is mostly self centered. How they react to such information will vary greatly even with the same person at the same company on a different day. There is no reason to reveal why you are looking for an abbreviated hiring schedule, so you shouldn't. Next time try something like this: "How long does it take to ...


1

The CEO said to me in discussion during interview that he wanted employees who will be able to stay long term in the company. He gave examples of most of his employees staying in the company for at least 5-6 years. This sentence is a pure declaration of intent which is not binding in any way: if the company loses a project for which you are hired, or your ...


-1

There’s an easy way to find out how long a commitment they really expect from you. Just look at how long a commitment they’re making to you — i.e. what is the notice period in the contract. If they’re expecting you to commit to them for years while retaining the ability for themselves to terminate the relationship within a few weeks, then they’re obviously ...


3

...an entry-level software job. ... I want to work in bigger corporate kind of companies. Being a Software Developer for 30+ years, I would advise on not adopting this mindset. Generally the larger the company, the less you can learn and the more vertical you will find your career. I have found the mid-to smaller companies generally give one more ...


3

In my experience stick with the first choice. You made that choice for the right reasons at the time - some objective others instinctive. If you change you will go through when times get tough - all jobs have that - you think that the original job would be better. Go on your gut feeling.


-1

the owners like to talk things out directly with employees, which ultimately results in employee satisfaction, and thus most of their employees stay there for long term. Well there's your answer. Just go to the employer and tell them openly you are unsure of how long you will stay. They will understand and you can work through to a satisfactory compromise ...


0

Maybe. Find out what career advances people who have been at the company for 5 years have made. See if that lines up with what you want to be doing in 5 years. At any rate the company owner isn't asking you to marry him/the company. You'll be free to leave any time you want. It's up to the company to do things that make you want to be loyal. You would find ...


8

Beggars can't be choosers You need a job. You've been offered one. It's not your ideal job, but if you're willing to take it, your need for a job outweighs your need for the perfect job. And as others have said, you don't know you won't want to stay there long term unless you've gotten enough red flags that you should probably just pass. Otherwise I'd ...


1

Depending on your situation, I would suggest to go with the flow on the current offer while waiting on others, that may or may not happen Each company has their own timeline on talent hunting and on-boarding. If current offer is what you are looking for but you want to wait a bit before committing, check your offer / contract and clarify points that you ...


13

If they aren’t asking you to commit to a long period in writing, you should not feel at all guilty about taking the job. It is not unprofessional to put your career ahead of what the company would prefer. It would be unethical to lie and say you intended to stay for years, but there’s no need to bring up that you may take a better offer in 6 months if it ...


6

Contractors are often hired for shorter stints, but they are usually given tasks that can be done without understanding the full picture and the expectancy often is they bring sufficient skills so that they can be productive enough in that timeframe. As an Internal, you will be onboarded extensively. (Not all companies do this, but companies with an average ...


144

I would suggest that you take this job immediately if it is the only job offer you have right now and if you are currently unemployed. The reason is that you don't know for sure when your next job offer may come. If possible, please stay with this company for at least 1 year to earn meaningful working experiences. You don't have to tell them that you don't ...


38

As a very general rule of thumb as to how I look at things (for permanent staff, contract roles are obviously different): One short role you can explain in a sentence. Two consecutive short roles I'll start wondering and ask a few questions. Three consecutive short roles will really make me start thinking you're unlikely to stay in whatever role I'm hiring ...


6

First decide how long you want to delay deciding for. It's unprofessional at best to leave it open ended. Then just ask for that amount of time to decide due to personal commitments. They will either come back with their own timeframe or more information. Either way you have something to move forwards with.


1

The answer is: Do some research. You are not worth what you are worth. You are worth what the company would otherwise pay to replace you to do the same job that you would be doing. In other words, you are worth what someone else, doing the same job as you, is worth. So remove your current situation from the equation; the only question to ask and answer ...


1

I don't think this is something to worry or stress about. If you suggest something that is too high its unlikely they will take back the offer. They will just say that's not reasonable and likely tell you why - i.e standard is blah for this role. Equally if you undersell yourself you will be underpaid for a while and then once you have stronger CV can just ...


0

My recommendation is that you try to find reputable salary and bonus information for your position in your city/metro area. Further, I would start by using the 75th percentile to evaluate your salary expectation (but be prepared to accept as low as the median, 50th percentile). For example, in my industry, we would pay an IT Manager around $125k at the 50th ...


4

One of those two offers, however, is a significant bump and a few grades higher than the other offer. - They have asked me what I am expecting for salary, bonuses, and Reserved Stock Units (something I've never dealt with before). I am at a loss at how to pick the right values. These statements are in a bit of conflict with each other. You know what the ...


0

To you, all that matters is what you would like to get for your work, and what is the minimum that you would accept (a bit more complicated in reality, there is a minimum that you would accept if you find it impossible to get a different offer, there is an amount where you would look elsewhere for a while and maybe come back, there is an amount where you ...


2

Never accept counter-offers You have already been flagged as “disloyal” by management and they will be seeking to replace you at their earliest possible convenience. The counter-offer itself is not in good faith An “albeit” raise is not a raise A promise of equity is not equity (particularly since this particular promise has been decaying for 3 years now) A ...


5

A company that immediately matches an offer at 150% of your salary knew they were underpaying you and were just hoping you wouldn't complain too much. Good leadership would have been looking after you to make sure you were happy with your compensation in the first place. What's worse is that this isn't even being added to your contracted salary, it's just ...


4

You listed five reasons why you want to move. They all look perfectly rational IMO. So, the question is, how does a supposedly "guaranteed" annual bonus, and some worthless share certificates that might or might not have value at some unknown future date, address those five reasons? The answer should be obvious: they don't address any of them. They ...


0

You should also keep in mind a seperate metric - What is THIS role worth to the company. Can they find someone 40% cheaper to do the work 10% less productive than you? Can they find someone that will do the job perfectly for cheaper? I would argue, it is less about what you individually should be paid. I would make the argument more about, what they are ...


2

They didn't match the salary increase. That bonus may or may not come, and there were already broken promises. Don't believe for a second in that bonus. Solution: Ask for an actual change in salary, bonuses are not salary. They already won 50% of your current salary for the past year at least. That money is your money. Solution: Ask for a bonus for the ...


21

See my answer here - Ways to respond when HR says your market salary range research isn't correct? Basically.... Why stay on a counter offer when you could start somewhere else at 50% more? You have hit your ceiling. Whether this money materializes, you will likely not progress any further here. At other place, you are starting at 50% more. That's your ...


6

OK, so if I'm reading this correctly, your company, within 15 minutes of receiving your resignation, offered to match your new offer, with the additions that: You will continue to make your current salary and then get a big end-of-year bonus to make up the salary difference (this isn't a salary increase, it's simply a promise of a bonus, more on this in a ...


-3

Is this a chance for you to "have your cake and eat it"? If they're serious about your bonus, ask them to pay it within the week. And the equity paperwork too. And then once the money is in the bank, accept the other role. <insert machiavellian laugh>


8

There are good answers here already to your final question "Does any of this ring alarm bells for anyone?" But I think you're starting from a problematic premise, which is "do I trust an employer who has broken promises in the past?" The answer to that is of course not. But there's a different question I think is lurking behind that ...


32

How is this even a question? You're leaving because the company has broken promises with you, and right now they're... offering a bunch of promises. "Oh, we'll totally give you a bonus later this year! Oh, we'll totally give you stock options! Oh, we'll totally sell the company soon and make you rich!" Notice something? They're not actually ...


62

When my friend was leaving their job for another, and asked me the same question, it was very simple to answer - for me and for them. If money wasn't an issue, would you stay at your current job, or take the new job? Are you leaving because of money, or are you leaving for any other reason? For my friend the answer was "no" - they would take the ...


51

Does any of this ring alarm bells for anyone? Yes. Very much so. Your leadership is not behaving in a "ethical" manner. They darn well knew that you were severely underpaid, otherwise they wouldn't have counter offered that quickly. "guaranteed" bonus is NOT the same as base salary. Guarantees can be revoked and bonuses rules can change,...


10

We hear from all the counteroffers that go bad. Recruiters who want you to switch tell you these stories to get you to switch, and of course Recruiters hear counteroffers that go bad, because people call them again later. But recrutiers don't hear counter offers that go well. So the good cases are hidden. I have experienced counter offers that have gone well....


4

"I've researched that average market standard for people of my skills and experience is 20 LPA." The first thing you need to do is throw out "market rate" for programmers. IT/Programming, more than any other job I've seen, is governed by Price's Law: Price's square root law or Price's law pertains to the relationship between the [total ...


11

Remember that a salary negotiation is a business negotiation. You have something they want (your skills and productivity), and you name your price. Either what you have to offer is worth what you demand, or it's not. The goal of a business negotiation is to come to a consensus about this question. They can make arguments that what you demand is too much ...


27

To answer the immediate question: there is almost certainly nothing you can say here that will enable you to get a 20 LPA offer for this role. You probably just need to make a choice as to whether you accept the 17 LPA offer or refuse it. More generally, the rule of thumb in salary negotiations is "whoever mentions a number first loses". By ...


0

However, last week I told them that today I would get back to them regarding the offer letter which is time sensitive, Then that's what you should do. Don't break a commitment you've already made. but I don't want to accept the offer letter before they get back to me about the advance on salary, even though I will accept the offer whether they give the ...


1

If you are going to accept either way, you need to go ahead and accept now. You have already made a bit of extra work for them with the advance. That's fine, but every additional high maintenance thing you do adds up. Don't do them for no actual outcome difference. They may just decide to go with an alternate candidate if you have too many demands during ...


-1

First of all, I am not familiar with such a grading system. I speak for Germany, I don't know which country you come from as you didn't mention this. In Germany, there are usually two types of employment contract, collective bargaining and non-collective bargaining. For collective bargaining, rules are set by a contract between the union and the employers, ...


5

Nothing wrong with asking about the grading system, but knowing what it looks like may or may not answer your questions. It's better to ask specific questions: If you want to work in a senior position - make sure you're interviewing for a senior position Negotiate the salary that's right for you What are the growth opportunities for this position? What does ...


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