New answers tagged

2

I have taken a break too and it was a good 4.5+ years. This is how I mentally prepared myself. 'No matter what my skills are, there is a job for everyone in this world'. With that in my mind, I took concrete steps to get back in the industry. I looked at my original skill set, looked at the documentation of each for the latest versions and spent enough ...


1

As a person in that very job, I can tell you that general use of PHP hasn't changed that much. Assuming you used MySQL it hasn't changed at all as per Oracle's MO (However the codebase has been forked a few times e.g. MariaDB, adding a bunch of new features). For the frontend, quite a lot has changed: JavaScript ES6 has been out long enough now for it to ...


3

You don't necessarily need to update at all, at least before looking for work. The state of play has obviously shifted since 2011, but not to the extent you couldn't pick up (for example) the modern parts of PHP on the job. Of course, another potential opportunity would be working on a reasonably old PHP codebase (there's lots around) where knowledge of any ...


5

they haven't received any confirmation from their project and that they'd contact me A MNC has a lot of moving parts, schedules, and agendas for things to take a long time. What they told you basically was, you were selected for that project but we don't know if we need you yet. You do not have an offer. Keep interviewing, keep looking for jobs. Put this ...


0

And what should I say when they ask about my current offers from university (as it is expected any good student will have offers). Its unlikely they will ask. I've seen it a few times, but its really not that common. There's no good reason for them to care about offers unless they are trying to take advantage of you divulging too much information to lowball ...


1

Continue interviewing. If company B makes you an offer and you decide to take it, let company A and your university know as soon as possible. Until that time, however, do not divulge the fact that you're interviewing to anyone who does not strictly need to know. If asked by your university, dodge the question by pointing to your offer from company A. If ...


3

We can´t tell you what to do. First make up your mind where you ultimately want to be. Startup can be quite exciting, but can also be a hell to work in an with no experience... you will probably be expected to do get things done with little supervision. If you want to stay at A, tell B you have singed a contract elsewhere. Tell them you are sorry but the ...


0

If you don't like your doctoral program, don't waste any more time at it. Please keep this in mind: universities are churning out far too many PhDs for the number of available teaching and research jobs. If getting through your doctorate is going to be a struggle for you, so will finding a job afterward. As far as self-respect goes in the programming ...


22

This is business. Your self-worth is not at stake. You are being asked to invest your only irreplaceable resource, your time, in this company. By trading cash salary for shares / ESOP / options / RSUs / whatever, you become an investor in the company. This is fairly common at early-stage companies. Therefore: part of your decision-making process should be ...


1

Ethics: You are ethically bound to be honest (in most situations), and if you agreed to work for someone then that's what you must do. However, there is nothing wrong with going for an interview unless you said that you would not do that. If something happens to stop you attending the first job, you might be able to proceed with the second and avoid ...


-2

You don't owe loyalty to a company ever. That's a myth the elites have propagated to create a servant class.


4

they said due to their policy being to not disclose this They genuinely said that their policy is not to tell a candidate how much they will be paid?! A reasonable answer to that is "I can't tell you how many days a week I'll work for you if you can't tell me how much you're paying". It does not have to be all in the same letter - they can write the ...


1

As an unhappy PhD student in their fourth year, I highly recommend quitting if you already lost motivation after three months. Since you prefer to hear advice on the how rather than the what, let me cast my reasons as to why in that form. That is, how should you make this decision: Consider the short term future, e.g. the next four years. Do you enjoy ...


4

Simply put your agreed salary in writing to them. Say that you will join then subject to them paying a salary of xxxxxx. That way you are covered. Basic terms would usually be sent in an offer letter but there's nothing to stop you saying your accepting the offer based on certain conditions, it is a two way process and they don't get to call the shots.


55

So is this offer letter legally correct or not? It doesn't matter. You should walk away even if it is legal. It's already a big red flag in terms of professionalism to not by default include salary in an offer letter. But to outright refuse when pressed? You're 100% in not-legitimate territory here. There's simply no reason why this would be their policy ...


13

In the future, do not accept an offer until you've seen the written contract (and possibly the employee manual if the contract refers to it in any way). In the meantime, proceed as if you don't have a contract yet, because you don't. Keep on interviewing with other places. Do not stop. Do not slow down. If currently employed, do not quit until you have ...


9

Agree, looks super fishy. If you have a choice, leave this company in your tracks and don't look back. On the other hand, if you have nothing to lose and have NO other options, go to your first day and see if they going to scam you and for how much. Don't sign anything binding and be prepared to walk away. P.S. Please keep us posted.


18

Simply point out that you cannot consider leaving your existing position until you have the received and reviewed the full details of what they are offering, including any terms or agreements they expect you to sign.


27

A job-offer letter is just a contract where you say "I promise to work for you" and the other parties say "in return I promise the following things..." That is all it is. You could have a job offer that says "I promise to come and drink your coffee once a week" and "In return we promise to loudly yell insults" This job offer would be both legal and ...


141

[....] the salary annexure and appointment letter will be issued on your joining. So, basically you're expected to accept an offer and join the work without having any written proof of appointment and confirmed agreement on your payout? Anything which is not a part of written agreement from proper authority, is not part of any agreement, at all. If I ...


3

I am not a lawyer. That said, many of the existing answers and comments sounded decidedly... American... to me - something you’re often at risk of on the SE network. In my country (NZ) sharing the letter you had provided for the purpose of offering you a job with another company for a different purpose would be a breach of your privacy, and you could (at ...


10

This is India. TL;DR Incidents like this used to happen in the past, happening at present and WILL continue to happen in future. You cannot expect any sense of ethics from the most companies and their HR representatives. Do not hesitate to help them realize the taste of their own medicine. Write your reviews in Glassdoor, Indeed, MouthShut, LinkedIn, ...


4

There are good answers, but I’m going to address more simply your “what can I do?” You can choose to not work for either of them, and/or you can make sure other people know what kind of people they are.


10

I just want to chime in since every existing answer thinks you did something wrong. It's possible that in your location/field it's considered unacceptable to share information about offers, but that's certainly not always the case. At least in the United States and with software engineers, telling a company you have an offer from another is completely 100% ...


6

Remember this next time someone tries to push you around. Some people will exploit you. Some people will lie to you. Some people will take advantage of you. This is an almost inevitable certainty. You'll never be able to prevent it completely, but you can learn from past mistakes to help avoid future ones. The next time someone tries to pressure you to ...


5

FYI, if a company is forcing you to do something you know is improper, specially doing the interview, you do not want to work for them. Second, never tell the name of the company you have an interview/offer with. If your market is small, interviewer might figure the other company out quickly. Or, might even be friends with someone with decision power in the ...


20

That’s not what you want to say. You want to tell them that you would be happy to accept their offer but can’t at the moment because of the bond. The new company may decide to do something to get you released earlier if they want to, so your problem goes away. Or they may hold on that information and contact you in a year. If you say you’re comfortable ...


1

I don't think there is anything wrong with your rejection as you have currently phrased it. I often get offers and reply in a similar way: [Thanks for your interest/Thanks for reaching out], but I'm not looking for a new position at this time. I'll be sure to reach out to you if anything changes. I have never had anyone take that badly


1

Just say "No, I am comfortable with my company and in future when I want to change then I will inform you" in a little more polished version "Thanks for the offer, but right now I'm not looking for a change. I'll get back to you if I change my mind."


5

I had offer from employer A and employer B forced me to show offer letter of A Actually, nobody can force you to do anything. I agree that company B played dirty into tricking you to provide that information, but it was you who "agreed". They were even dirtier when the contacted company A with the info from you. While company A has the right to make legal ...


11

There is nothing you can do. You've already screwed up. This is what you should have told them instead. "I'm sorry, but I can not in good conscience forward a private communication sent to me from another potential employer." Please note the purposefully vague language I'm using here. It's important to not even disclose the name of ...


24

I am unclear how he 'forced' you to show him the offer letter. If he said he wouldn't make you an offer without you disclosing the confidential letter from company B. It is your fault you gave in to that, you weren't forced. What you should do is learn to walk away. The boss of company B sounds like a jerk, you don't want to work for a jerk. You certainly ...


70

What should I do? Learn a lesson, hope company A does not initiate legal action against you, and move on. Can I file complaint against him or his organization? Forget you ever thought of this; you are the one at fault here. To elaborate, unless company B used physical means to snatch that letter out of you (which constitutes a criminal case against ...


4

Correct it in the background check to a generic Credit Intern, chances are you'll be fine. But there's nothing else you can do unless asked. In which case you can make an explanation Best not to draw attention to it otherwise. It's fairly minor at the end of the day and job titles are company specific, in this case the company itself doesn't know what the ...


3

You wouldn't like it if said company kept surprising you with new contract terms every time you've agreed on something. Especially in this stage of your relationship, it's best to be transparent and open about your requests. There's also an added benefit to this transparancy; if the company is unable to meet one of your requests, let's say there's a ...


9

Is it okay to negotiate salary and remote work at the same time? TL;DR: Is is OK and it is expected. Think about this: in the job offer, if the organization mentioned only one responsibility and after accepting the offer, they tell you about another responsibility, and after joining, they tell you about several more - how would you feel? Put all terms and ...


4

Negotiate for everything you want at the start. It's best to lay your cards on the table so everyone knows what is happening, no surprises further down the line. That just makes you look like you didn't think things through seriously, which is unprofessional.


0

You will just have to wait. Obviously it sounds like the company is readying accounts so you can start on time, but until they get the OK, you aren't officially hired. You might have to ask someone in HR specifically (unless this was an internal recruiter) about your status. If you still haven't heard in a couple of weeks, you'll definitely need to ask ...


3

Should I follow up with the recruiter about this? Yes. But it sounds like you already did ("I probed the recruiter about relocation details and they responded they are still waiting on background check results"). You might wish to ask the recruiter when you should expect the background check to be completed. Should I disclose anything at this point? No....


6

Given that you have answered all the questions truthfully, and did not intentionally hide / withheld information, you don't need to be worried. If you were not asked / expected to reveal any particular information, you don't need to provide it. Just give it a couple more days. Check back same time next week, if you don't get to hear in the meantime.


13

From the comments: "Frankly, I don't wanna join this startup at all! The ONLY reason I want their offer is so I can use it as leverage to drive up my compensation in other companies. So I need a safe way of accepting their offer (without signing anything), that I can later turn down." This is an important piece of context that should have been in ...


-1

With the caveat that customs and contracts vary by location, I need to go one step past yes. You should keep interviewing until you've landed where you're landing for the foreseeable future. Finding and starting a new job implies a settling down period. No reasonable company can expect that all applicants are ONLY talking with them. So at minimum, just ...


3

No, it's not unethical until your seat is firmly planted behind the desk at the new job. I've seen 11th hour retractions of offers, you owe the companies nothing until you are actually an employee


3

You asked, should I continue interviewing after verbally accepting an offer? And you made a good point when you said, I've been reading up and it seems like a verbal offer isn't really an offer until it's a contract Ultimately, in a black and white world, that's basically true. Until you have a signed contract, you should continue to pursue options. ...


22

Yes, not only that, but recommended. The advise on pretty much all questions on this site (over and over) is: Don't change what you're doing until you have a signed contract in your hand. I.e. A verbal offer is only worth a strangers-word and is not concrete. Until they have sent that contract to you and it has been signed, everything is still up in the ...


3

While 5k might seem like a reasonably substantial amount, if you work it out, it comes in at a less impressive sounding $96 extra per week. Then, if you pay income tax, this will be eroded further - to maybe half that depending on where you live. Only you know how much extra you'd come out with every week and if that would make a material difference to your ...


2

Consider the risk also; you're being offered less than market value, to work in a company with no track record, which is not making a profit. At the very least, you should be offered share options in this startup to mitigate the risk (you'll probably never be able to use them, but in the rare event the company succeeds, you'll have a small bonus to look ...


3

My first suggestion would be to respond to the new job offer with, "My current position pays me €65,000 and so I'm afraid I'm unable to accept a cut in pay." If they really want you they're probably going to be willing to at least match your current salary, and I don't think you're going to alienate them by asking for such a straightforward and reasonable ...


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