New answers tagged

4

If any company gives you a written job offer with full details including pay, and benefits, but still has conditions such as passing a background check, receiving approval from the customer, or awarding of a contract; then you are not obligated to stop looking. As long as there are conditions, then there is a chance you won't get the job. In your case they ...


5

Now, my question is that professionally speaking, can I do interviews with other employers and dump the previous position once I am offered a job which hire me immediately? Yes. They have made no real commitment to you, so you are not obliged to keep waiting for them. If any, putting you on a 6 week hold is rather unprofessional. Given that's a government ...


2

If you already know your feelings about a role then walk away early to make everyone's life easy. In your situation there may be more to it. How about this: Thank you for considering me for position A. Having had the opportunity to discuss in more depth at the interview I realise this is not [yet] a role I could fulfil well or enjoy. As a result, I ...


17

Speaking as a hiring manager, I would appreciate knowing you don't intend to take the position before working on an offer for you. Having a candidate wait until they have an offer in hand might make me think they are inconsiderate, a time waster, and not a team player. Additionally, I would absolutely let the other hiring manager/recruiter know what the ...


0

Obviously this is not true, there are lots of great people at startups that would be hired by big corps anytime, and there are lots of great people in corporate who would be sought after in startups. All else being equal they might prefer someone who has more similar experience, but then they might want some fresh ideas to shake things up too. Regardless, ...


4

I'd suggest that as long as you are good at what you do, you will always be able to find a job somewhere. While it's common for companies to seek out candidates with past experience which aligns with the role in question, that's not always the case. There will always be companies and hiring managers who are more interested in raw ability or cultural fit. ...


2

If you like your current job and your current salary, you should speak with your current manager. Because if your potential new job slips through the cracks and your current boss learns of it and gets offended you didn't let them know, after this whole incident, you may be worse off. It also doesn't hurt to speak with HR to ask what the process should be. ...


0

I'm surprised this hasn't gotten more responses. Putting some possibilities out there to maybe stimulate others with more big-company experience than me to respond. This feels a bit weird to me, do managers in big companies "steal" each other's employees? My feeling is generally no, unless inter-departmental relations are unusually bad. But it is ...


1

I'd do the interview. Any conflict or bruised feelings that might result are things the two managers can sort out amongst themselves (since they still presumably have to work together). I mean, I'd make sure the new prospective manager knew that you were already working for the company, albeit for another manager, but that may not even be an issue, depending ...


1

First of all, the amount of value someone can contribute to a company in a given job is capped at a certain level for most jobs. Even if you are the next Elon Musk you cannot earn the company millions if you are employed as a bookkeeper for a small/midsized company. Therefore having a hard cap on a salary makes perfect sense. Putting a high "up-to-X&...


6

If you don't want to work for less than X it means you can skip this offer. If you find X a good compensation then you know you know you can apply to the offer and expect a proper compensation.


2

It’s fine to connect with any business contact on LinkedIn and you don’t need a big spiel as to why. As a hiring manager I have prospective employees, ones in the process, and ones who did and did not get offers connect with me, and I’m happy to accept if they were not rank psychos. Feel free and add a brief note “While it didn’t work out right now I ...


-1

Mistakes happen. It's possible this is a deliberate bait and switch, but it probably isn't. If it was a bait and switch they would have waited more than 3 hours to tell you. Sometimes people just mess up. It's upsetting to have your hopes got up only to be dashed, but in reality you have suffered little. (It would be different if you had resigned from an ...


13

This is indeed an unfortunate situation. Something doesn't feel right here. This is NOT a trivial mistake to make and you had verbal confirmation from HR, manager and director that this is indeed remote. One person screwing up is entirely possible, three people screwing up the same way is rather strange. Your best shot is to call the manager and/or director ...


22

The first thing you need to do is contact the manager and director and let them know the problem. This may not help but it's well worth the try. If the job is doable remotely then they can probably push that through for you if they want. Your only other realistic option is to speak to your company about retaining your job. You have one other option which is ...


4

is it foolish to turn down the offer from this mid sized company for a contingent offer? No. It's a perfectly rational decision. is it risky to wait a month or two for an official offer after a contingent offer Only a little. It seems that the large company is on the ball and communicating well, so the likelihood of them going back is small. Nothing is ...


0

It sounds indeed unlikely that you can hide your pregnancy until a new/permanent contract is offered. This indeed puts you in a bit of a tough spot. However it is possible that the comments of your direct manager might make you see everything unnecessary gloomy. The company already planned/commited to employing you for a long period. They did so fully well ...


0

You probably need to tell them you're pregnant - eventually. But eventually doesn't mean right now. It's illegal to discriminate based on pregnancy so I don't have any sympathy for them wanting to know it before offering you a job (that's the textbook definition of discrimination, yeah?). What I would do is start working towards the permanent role now. ...


1

You are in very tough spot and I think you should consider your self interest first. So, ask a lawyer and/or talk to an union. In parallel, collect any evidence regarding your reviews and feedback you had. You might need to prove that you were an excellent employee. It's true that you don't know how they might react; maybe they will just be happy for you and ...


5

Ideally I'd wait until receiving an offer before telling her I'm pregnant. But seeing as my boss won't be able to formalise an offer until at least June – when I'll be six months pregnant – it seems impractical to wait until then. It sounds to me like you want to keep your pregnancy private and I don't think anyone, even when obvious, would point out that ...


1

First, my company does "contingent upon successful background check" offers because the City of Austin requires a signed offer before background can be run, not because we want to bind a candidate to our company. For locations that don't have such requirements, we offer the background check to the prospective employee long before the offer is made, ...


0

I think the “wrong” in your question is/should be “unprofessional”. So, I will consider it as such and say that I think most professions would not consider rejecting a previously accepted contingent offer before the contingency has happened as unprofessional. Typical contingencies are there in order to protect the employer (visa, background, internal ...


0

"Looks like you have a decision to make!"


2

It probably depends on how the offer letter is written but the vast majority of offer letters that I've seen do not obligate you to work for them. They elaborate on the companies obligations to you (to pay you, to provide insurance, to offer x vacation days, etc), but they don't obligate you to the company. That said, it might not be a bad idea to tell the ...


1

After reading the answers already I'm not sure there's a complete picture here. First, an offer letter is legally binding. If they give you an offer letter and do not present you with a contract to sign or otherwise do not hire you, then you would easily win a claim against them for damages. And if they're a big company, they know this and would not do this, ...


0

Not signing a contract before tendering your resignation can actually be advantageous if you're open to counter offers by your current employer. If you are leaving to make more money, your employer may offer more money on the spot to keep you. They may also be amenable to other changes like allowing work from home, or other benefits. And as others have ...


1

It's hard to answer for sure without knowing the industry, as customary practice varies significantly by industry in the U.S., especially if you would be part of a unionized workforce. However, on average, U.S. employment situations don't have a signed employment contract at all, either before or after beginning work. There is frequently some kind of ...


6

Sorry, but unless the offer letter is signed then you do not have secured employment, period. You are right to be worried because neither company has your best interest in mind. If company B rescinded after you put in a two-week notice then do you personally have enough capital to sue them for damages which arose from an unsigned offer letter? From https://...


2

I don't see a problem here. It could be as simple as they want to see you actually put your wet signature on the paper. This is why presidents sometimes sign documents in signing ceremonies, and not in the garage of their vacation home. It gives the process an air of gravitas. I personally like the process they've established. They sent you the contract ...


2

(Update Below: Start Date is everything, do you have one yet? I'd worry more about that than a contract) To my knowledge, a contract is binding even without a signature if no other contract was offered afterwards, neither party objected, and both parties moved forward as though the contract had been agreed to. If you have (or they have) recording of the ...


8

Short answer: YES you should be worried and try to secure the contract ASP. Long answer: It is gonna be fine most likely. Most likely there won't be any issue. Just sign on the first day. Not likely but has happened many times too: The company eventually decides not to hire you, even if verbally agreed. Not often but I know some real cases this happened. ...


28

I don’t think this is a big deal. If you are a permanent full time employee in the US, in my experience it’s pretty usual to get a written job offer, accept it in email, but not actually sign anything until you get a W-9 on day 1. There is basically no legal difference between a signature and the clearly extended and accepted offer you have performed in ...


40

Update: Based on all the feedback I've been getting, I've toned down my original answer. See my addendum near the bottom. This is what I would say (of course, please use your own words): I'm sorry. If I was unemployed, I would definitely wait for my first day to sign this contract. However, since I'm currently gainfully employed and since I am required to ...


4

Feb 9th: I am anxious now. I am not sure should I email or call HR. I would just look for other jobs. If they get back to you, great, but if not, at least you've resumed the job hunt. there are some changes in organization because of which there is some delay Could be that the hiring manager wasn't aware that these changes were in the pipeline at the time ...


0

You are free to take back your word, but you might be able to benefit from being open. It's a bit dependent on circumstances though. Ask a lawyer. You accepted, in writing, so your first employer may try to enforce this, and depending on your jurisdiction, this may or may not have consequences. Don't ask just about the law, ask what the typical outcomes of ...


8

I have only accepted via email after receiving a brief explanation of salary and main benefits. I have never seen the details of the contract. For example; -I have no idea on how long of a notice they need to fire me. -I do not know their policy on the paternity of inventions (very important in my field). -I was verbally told about salary increases within ...


2

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. If nothing is signed, then you have not agreed on the terms of your employment. Therefore you can simply say you have reconsidered the offer and chosen a different path, and that's that. The counterpositive of this would be that the company can say "you're hired! Do you accept?" and if you say yes then they can say &...


57

How to handle this? Reply to them with something like: Hello X. Upon further consideration I will not be able to accept this position. Thank you for your time throughout this process and please accept my apologies for any inconvenience that this may cause. Don't worry about the PC as it is meant for the position you applied to and not yourself ...


18

I want to join the second (new) place. How to handle this? Inform the first company that regretfully you will be unable to take their job. No need for details. Do not worry about computers or anything else. Your obligation stops there. Am I risking to put my recommenders in a bad light? No, your reason for changing your mind could be something unavoidable ...


-9

Would it be acceptable, in your opinion? It really doesn't matter if we think it is "acceptable" or not. Even with your reasons for reneging on the offer, it's not going to show you in a good light - you went back on your word. At the very least, you can probably forget about ever having a job with that company at any point in the future. Am I ...


Top 50 recent answers are included