245

Call his bluff. It would be extremely petty and inappropriate to do that. I cannot imagine doing it. One's life would have to be pretty small to do so. Having said that, if he does call...so what? Just tell your boss you got approached by them but turned them down. At this point it's your word against their word, and you're the one staying at ...


155

As a manager, if someone called me and said "hey, rooty, who works for you, got offered a job at my company but they turned it down!" I would certainly not hold it against rooty. If anything, I would want to congratulate rooty for making what seems like an obvious good decision to not go work for a company managed by inappropriate and awkward leaders. ...


101

On your resume, and when asked, you should never provide any of this detail. Your resume should focus on the good things you accomplished there. When asked why you are leaving, tread carefully. No-one will listen to the entire story, which sounds hard to believe, just because of the sheer length. Yet a very short answer like "it was a toxic environment" ...


96

A friend once relayed a story of threats that resulted in him simply replying, “If that’s what you think you should do, then that’s what you should do.” I believe it applies here as well. It tends to make the other party realize his actions are not terribly concerning to you. I’d focus more on your view of the work environment and your relationship with ...


53

I had multiple DUIs that happened 12 years ago all within the same time period. I am going to an interview where the job requires a background check. It is for an estate attorney's office. Even if I'm not asked, do I disclose this information during the interview, being that it will probably be the only chance I have to defend my past? Since ...


29

Generally speaking, you don't. When asked, you speak in a general sense about troubles about the company: "I found management had problematic relations with employees and vendors"... and if they are attuned to the industry, you won't be telling them anything they don't already know. That is, in fact, the crux of the matter and what they should be ...


29

Even if I'm not asked, do I disclose this information during the interview, being that it will probably be the only chance I have to defend my past? If you are not asked I don't see why you have to bring it up. If they bring it up, answer honestly and defend it as you have planned by now.


25

I would suggest that the correct course of action is to escalate this to a higher authority at the hiring firm. The action this "hiring manager" is taking is very unprofessional and in some jurisdictions may be grounds for you to sue. You came to them in confidence to explore a job opportunity and attempting to blackmail you is actual extortion which is a ...


24

No matter the course of action taken that you've decided to take, you should consider posting a review on Glassdoor of your experience interviewing with this company A consideration for doing so should be whether this could be traced back to you and whether the company would likely 'get revenge'. They may potentially have a lot of influence in your industry,...


22

Depending on your jurisdiction, this may be extortion. I would consult with a lawyer, you may be able to file criminal charges against the hiring manager or sue for damages if he causes you to be fired from your current company.


14

It is perfectly fine to ask this during an interview, and working from home is becoming more common now, especially for workers with kids at home or other responsibilities. At some point during the interview they will usually ask you if you have any questions. This is a good time to ask some questions, such as "will I usually be working from this office", "...


13

Keep in mind that employers will usually not be motivated to provide you feedback once they have rejected you - as far as they are concerned, the relationship is over. This isn't as malicious as it may sound, it's just business. In fact, they may be motivated to not give you feedback - even innocent-sounding feedback can be twisted into discrimination ...


10

Well, he CAN, but I'm not sure why he would, it's still an achievement and if he omits it someone will ask "Why do you have X years where you did nothing?" and that's not a pretty look either. I suspect however that it does not hurt his chances (Not more than not being there at least) and I think he/you need to go over his resume and brush it up. Without ...


10

Why would you include two sections about experience? Simply include one and call it "Experience". If you're applying for an entry-level position, it's expected that you may not have much, if any, experience in the field you are applying for - that's why it's an entry level job. However, any work experience can demonstrate your ability to function in a ...


9

Despite of doing all this, whenever I face interviews (currently I am looking for job) interviewers sounds completely disregarding the work that I have done. They do not even seems caring to look at my source code or documentation Don't be surprised by that. Interviewers not always are people with software background, and if they are they may not have the ...


9

Ask the recruitment agency if they can disclose the name of their client? Tell the recruitment agency that you are possibly, currently being interviewed by the said company for similar position. If they were unwilling to disclose the name of the company initially, this may cause them to reconsider. If the recruiter denies disclosing the name of the client (...


9

If an employer cares about your criminal history, they will ask - formally, in writing usually, as part of an official, signed application. In other cases, the background check authorization form you're presented with will include basic questions such as "have you ever been convicted of an X crime" and will typically allow you to write a description of what ...


8

I doubt they are expecting you to design an entire system out of thin air right before their eyes. They want to hear about what process you would employ to get the job done. Answer similarly to: I would start first by gathering all the requirements, then start gathering the resources to complete the requirements, once I had all that I needed to get to ...


8

Usually my cover letter just has "dear hiring manager" and the job title. Someone suggested I search on sites like LinkedIn to find the name of the person who hires, and add the companies address and phone number. Is this a good idea? No. This is bordering on cyber stalking and I wouldn’t recommend it. LinkedIn is a service meant to help individuals promote ...


8

I resolved this problem in two ways: I got a dual sim phone (but a second phone would work) with the cheapest plan I could find (approx £6/month for 200 minutes of calls which is more than enough). I use this number exclusively for recruitment. I set my voicemail message to explain my situation. In my case, I am a contractor, so when I am in a contract, my ...


8

No interviewer is going to mind getting an exceptionally skilled candidate per se. The real concern is that someone who is overskilled for the job might be bored, unmotivated, or suffer from low morale or company loyalty. That's the concern they're voicing when they ask a question like that, and that's the concern that you should address. Your sibling ...


7

Given my overwhelmingly apparent lack of ability in the tools commonly used today. What should I focus on or put in a covering letter? To turn things around, I would suggest you bring yourself up to speed with such tools like Django, Numpy and SQL. You say you are self-taught programmer, so teaching yourself these topics should not be an issue for you. Try ...


6

That will surely vary from company to company, but it is completely normal for people in the tech industry to run private business on the side. The only problem I can see happening is if you have to dedicate too much time for your start-up. If you can balance things, most companies will be ok with it.


6

You could say what you just told us - that you don't want that employer to know that you're looking at other companies because you want to keep your options open. An analogous situation would be looking for another job whilst currently employed. A prospective employer contacting your current employer could give your current employer a heads up that you're ...


6

I think you misunderstand two points about design and design process. First, design and specifications, just like software, are never finished, only released. That is, you can always start small, cover most of the important ground given known knowns, commenting on known unknowns, and hypothesizing elsewhere. Remember, this is a test of communication skills, ...


6

Why they do it Inverviewers want to see your way of problem solving. It is not so easy for them to value your previous work even if it is accessible, as they don't know anything about the parameters, and they usually cannot spend enough time to really understand it. Furthermore, being able to prioritize and talk through problems on an abstract level are ...


6

How could I start either working for a company or on a project that could benefit me, give me practical experience and build my resume? The obvious answer is to apply for a job, get accepted, and start working there. Of course your age and inexperience will make that difficult, so you'll have to be creative about where you apply, and how you present ...


6

I would say that getting fired is getting fired, regardless of whether you're in the probation period or not. If the offense was too severe to merit working with you on the issues or otherwise deciding not to proceed with your probation period, then you'd have to tick that box. Most decent companies would attempt to address the issue at hand with a view to ...


6

This seems to be entirely the purpose of LinkedIn. You should indeed mention that you're not looking for a reference. Especially in case of the acquaintance you don't know well and whom I assume doesn't know you well either, it could be awkward if they were to assume you're asking for a reference and it could cause them not to respond to you.


5

How can I find this out during the interview process, without sounding like I won't show up to the office every day? "Is there a remote work option?" "Does the company have a work from home policy?" Either of these will do the trick. Neither of those make you sound like you won't show up in the office.


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