247

You can push back via the recruiter, sure. The recruiter may or may not pass on your feedback, and it may or may not result in a different outcome. Your feedback should be pretty polite though - so lose that "junior developer graded it" stuff, and explain in detail your answer to the SQL queries you mention. You might want to ignore the nit-picky stuff ...


126

They had me sign a very specific NDA where I could not state location, details of diet, heath, salary...not even disclose WHOM I WAS WORKING FOR. That's not as outrageous as you seem to be making it, I can't imagine that anyone hiring a personal chef would want that person to go on and put on their resume: "I worked for XYZ FAMOUS PERSON and had to ...


125

I suggest you take this as a learning experience and not beg for a re-take. What technologies they have listed on the job posting are things they could potentially ask about in the test. You should have prepared in advance. I highly doubt this opportunity is going to go anywhere even if you do re-take the test as first impressions are usually key.


86

This is one of those cases where you need to view the entire interview as a 2-way street. You're interviewing them just as much as they're interviewing you. If you'd really like to work here, then it may be worth your while to draft a response to the recruiter and interviewer indicating why you gave the answers you did and (gently) indicate why you ...


66

No. The point of such tests is to determine if you know the subject matter well and therefore would make a good candidate for the job. "Cramming" to pass the test is nearly as bad as not passing the test - they're not looking for "I managed to pass the test" they are looking for a knowledgeable professional. There's limited ways to do that other than ...


32

Should I let the internal recruiter know that I am likely doing the final interview at another company soon or should I wait until something more solid shows up? No. There is nothing to be gained, and it will not change the outcome. The internal recruiter, who had the project canceled on him, is probably way more frustrated then you are about canceling ...


28

Keep it simple: Personal Chef: June 2016 - January 2020 Cannot disclose details due to NDA Worked in a southern state for an athlete. During your interview just make sure to stick to the generic explanation outlined above and focus on your overall skills as a chef. The interviewer might not like it so they'll have to choose whether to believe ...


26

Do you think this interview process is reasonable, and additionally would this raise a red flag for you based upon their value of candidates time and energy? I don't find it unreasonable (although it is a longer than usual duration). Each company is different and they surely have their valid reasons for having such a time and process. This does not really ...


23

Some companies pay a salary, some pay compensation for suffering. (It's funny cause it's true) Paying more than any others is one sign towards that. Could there be another reason they pay better? This could be the case if they operate in a different sector. Apart from that: Having lots of bad reviews is definitely a sign. And if the good ones seem ...


18

You can still put the job in your resume, however instead of a detailed description, you would put a disclaimer like "Unable to disclose due to legal reasons". This will alert whoever is reading your resume that you simple cannot discuss the details, but you were still employed. Its better than having a large gap in your resume and having a generic job ...


18

I would not tell either recruiter. What would you hope to gain by telling either recruiter? There is potential that you would be removed from consideration for a job. Then if the other does not come through you've lost out on both jobs. When you have a signed offer (from either company) then you tell the other recruiter.


17

You asked, Do you think this interview process is reasonable, and additionally would this raise a red flag for you based upon their value of candidates time and energy? No, I don't think it's unreasonable. Although, it's pretty clear that "reasonable" is fairly subjective. If you think it's unreasonable, you can always decline the interview. "Is this a ...


17

Would it be reasonable to email the hr and ask for a retake after I had some time to prepare? It's not unreasonable. It's also perfectly possible that the HR decides not to let you retake the test. As such, I suggest you also consider looking for other job options while you wait for their answer. Learn from this, and next time try to prepare if you see ...


15

Other answers are good. I would suggest reaching out to your client and asking for assistance in finding a gig. The logic is that they have somewhat limited your employment options, getting in return excellent service and discretion.


13

At first, I found the question impolite. It's not. It's a perfectly normal and reasonable question to ask and it's one you need to be prepared for. Lying is a terrible idea. Also I find it to be a double standard, since it was a start-up, and most start-up I know have a 1 year employee turnover. While turnover is usually higher at start-ups, this ...


13

Just tell them the truth. I think the only thing you did wrong (maybe) was not following up the next day saying that you never received an email about a time to come in on the day of the interview. You knew what day it was and so I believe you had time to try to reach out to them beforehand. It is rather unfortunate that you did not get the email, that ...


11

Typically, when you're leaving a job, you don't tell your current employer, and you don't use your current employer as a reference. You ask the jobs you interview with not to contact your current employer, and they generally agree. (Sometimes they'll make your offer contingent on a reference check that happens after you give notice to your current employer.) ...


11

The question is, can I put the senior title on my CV? In this case, NO. Do not "invent" new title / designation, go by what you can prove (contract / references). How do I explain to a future employer that I deserve a seniors salary? This will entirely depend on the factor that how much value you bring in and going to add to the organization. Do not ...


11

No, that would defeat the point of the test. The point of these tests isn't to evaluate your level of skill in a programming language. The point of these tests is to cheaply provide the HR department with a metric with which they can use to justify tossing your resume in the bin. They've got hundreds of applications for each job, and they need something ...


10

Is there anything else to be considered, and are there any established ways on hiding these information? You don't need to hide anything, none of the points you mentioned - Gender, Heritage and Age should have a place in a traditional CV. You can (and you should) leave them off. Use the real estate for more relevant information. Regarding the ...


10

This company has already required a Telephone Interview and a code project which I completed successfully. I have now been invited to interview, and they are very keen. Great! I have now found out that the interview is going to be over 2hrs 45mins being split into multiple "micro" interviews by separate interviewers on separate topics. Most of which have ...


10

I ghosted the company–I stopped showing up and didn't respond to emails or phone calls. Yikes. That's pretty bad. Is it safe to assume that Y will be contacted to verify my employment? Yes, you should assume that. Is there anything that I can or should do? Most likely there is nothing you can do about this background check now. I guess you could ...


10

This entire predicament seems based on the assumptions that The internal recruiter will be unable to move quickly to make an offer The external recruiter will be unable to wait long once they've made an offer Those assumptions are probably both false, but better than that, it actually only takes one to be false to resolve the other anyway. Slow down. ...


8

I was a recruiter/resume screener until I moved into operations. Put yes, or else your resume won’t be read. Most of the time the form itself is not read. We have your resume which would tell us if you have a degree, so why do we have the form? So we can auto-reject you based on the details you put there. The form is meant to make life easy for us. All ...


7

Whether you can actually "apply" or not will largely depend on which is the accurate closing date, but since that needs to be determined the steps to take are the same. Compose a polite email to jobs@unops.org (the e-mail address was cunningly hidden on their "contact us" page, gotta watch out for those wily fraudsters and their tricks! The blurb above that ...


7

I graduate this semester. How should I answer “do you currently have a bachelor's degree?” Since in fact you do not currently have a degree, the only truthful answer when given only Yes or No choices is "No". If the online application form allows for comments, then you can clarify your answer there. Otherwise, make it clear in your resume when you expect ...


7

I had a similar situation. The test was online. However, there were some mistakes. I took the test. Filled it with the proper answers (even if it meant failing). After that, I sent them a detailed e-mail, describing the problems I found in the test. They thanked me, and I have no idea what happened next, it is their problem. BTW, clarification: I passed the ...


7

I'll add a different perspective. Maybe they sent you the results exactly because they wanted to elicit some sort of feedback from you. Fully acknowledging that a written technical test is very much different from a face-to-face interview... When I conduct technical interviews, on a couple of "how would you do X" type questions, when I receive correct ...


7

Just ask. If you want to work there, ask. The answer will go one of two ways: They'll say yes, you'll retake the test, and get another shot. They'll say no, and you'll probably never talk to them again. It's not a strange thing to really want to work somewhere, or to believe in yourself, so it's not likely anyone would hold that against you in a way ...


6

Given the information you provided, I'd definitely apply for the job. If you think you were a good fit for the department 2 years ago, you probably still are. If so, should I make reference to the fact they interviewed me before? The company has experienced a lot of growth in this time & the manager likely won't remember me as it was just under 2 ...


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