18

I would want to use him in my new search, but this will guarantee that my current manager know about my plan This is not going to happen, because: Before the switch: It is not in the recruiter's interest to inform your manager, as a recruiter earns commission when you get the job via them. But them telling your manager is a relationship spoiler for the ...


14

The short answer to your question is "Yes". Now for the longer answer. You are an entry level developer. What you think of as "decent" today will change, radically. What you think of as a large program will change. What you think of every aspect of everything about what being a developer is all about, will change. So, you need to alter your perception ...


10

No, you should not leave that section blank, simply because the cover letter may, or may not, be passed on through the system with the application form.


9

What would be the best course of action to minimize misunderstanding? You sent an honest thank you note, so there is few room for misunderstanding and this person will get that you wanted to thank them for the interview. I don't know the level of authority that page you linked has, but I wouldn't take it as the absolute truth. In a way I feel you are ...


8

I’m a decent coder, can I get a job without having job experience or internships? Yes you can, as we all did at some point when we were seeking to land our first job. Try to be realistic. Apply for junior roles, which are the ones you have more chances of getting hired in. Then, when you start gaining work experience and hands-on experience, it will be ...


8

Go. Look for a full time job for after you graduate. The only reason not to go would be if you had accepted an offer to a full time position already.


5

Even if they do have access to the cover letter, someone reviewing dozens of applications is unlikely to go read one in case it has the answer to a question in the application that was left blank. At a minimum, copy-paste the relevant paragraph from the cover letter, even do not have any more detail to add.


5

Ignoring for a moment company policies, which will vary from company to company, the answer most likely depends on why you didn't get the original position. Here are some answers -- You were one of several highly ranked candidates in the final interview round In this case, it may well be that you'd once again be highly ranked and wind up being successful. ...


5

You say you are a 'decent coder', so I assume you must have some level of coding experience, that you have gained from somewhere? There is a lot of demand out there for coding. I've seen people I know land entry-level coding jobs by showing they have experience with hobby projects, e.g. games coding, free software, or other hobby apps they have worked on in ...


5

Most companies looking for a developer are already used to employees that don't have a degree. It is something quite commom in this area, so most companies will take experience over education. Simply apply to jobs, detail your 6 years of experience and good luck!


5

It's unlikely to help. Chances are they noticed this themselves: Interviewing costs time and money and if the lacking requirement eliminated the candidate through oversight, they are likely to update the JD and more importantly the pre-interview screening process. If they are not smart or organized enough to take action on this, your notification is ...


4

Your wanting a new job is indisputably a good thing from the recruiters standpoint, It means he or she will get paid again. Unless you're dealing with an in house recruiter or a real sleazeball, there's zero reason for one to burn bridges by tipping off your current employer.


4

Do what anyone without a degree does to show potential employers your skills. First, you do still have a resume with work experience - I don't know why you think you have "no real employment record that can be recognized by Americans." We do in fact realize other countries exist and people have work experience from there. Ideally we can confirm it with ...


4

I'm going to give an answer on two facets... and you're probably not going to like the second facet. First facet: Work Experience To be honest, work experience is almost a proxy when it comes to coding, especially for junior-level positions. We don't think, "Hey, this person worked for 10 years as a coder, so let's hire him." We think, "Hey, this person ...


4

The recruiter will act in their best interest. And it’s absolutely not in their best interest to tell your boss. I can go to a recruiter and say “I don’t want to stay in my job forever. I’m not in a rush, but give me a call if anything turns up.” Good news for the recruiter: He will eventually find a new job for me and cash in. Telling my manager isn’t ...


4

What would you gain by telling them? You won't get the role, but I guess it might keep your name in a slightly positive light should you apply for a different role. If they haven't put in a key skill to their job description then they will no doubt not get the candidates they actually want, to me it would seem if they miss something basic like that then ...


4

Adding to previous answers, I found Linkedin very valuable when it comes to understanding companies I've applied/ want to apply at. If you apply somewhere and see that your future peers e.g. are considerably less educated or only men (I'm female) or have a very different background or much less/ more experience, that's a very important piece of information. ...


4

No question in an application form should go unanswered (unless it's innappropiate). It is not unusual for there to be redundancy in all sorts of communication, and as has been mentioned already, the answer to the application may be read by someone who is not provided the cover letter. I also would be hesitant to simply copy what is in your cover letter. ...


4

In addition to the other answers, it also depends hugely on your locale. In my part of the World a lot of people make linkdin profiles just to show off, there is zero chance of them landing a job through it even if they didn't make up half the stuff in their profile. I made a profile and spent a day having a laugh at what people had put down in their ...


4

This is a hard question to answer because "how valuable is X?" can depend on how you define value. LinkedIn has a few potential "values" in the job search process: As a job posting tool: You're probably well aware, but LinkedIn has it's own jobs posting functionality, and many employers use it to post openings they have. If you find a job on LinkedIn that ...


4

Go. It's not disrespectful, as the company you're interning at hasn't (and might not) extend a permanent offer. Keep plenty of irons in the fire.


4

Are you sure you want to step back? If you had time, would you do the assignment? If so, you can write something like: Due to personal reasons, I won't have time to work on your assignment within the given timeframe. I am interested in working for your company and would like to request an extension to $date. If you just want to withdraw your ...


3

The benfits of linkedin are is massively oversold, usually by linkedin, and the recruiters that use it. The only real benefit to linkedin is you can communicate with ex-colleagues reasonably easily. I think that's about a beneficial as the "networking" aspect goes. With the companies I've been at, when interviewing, we don't use linkedin profiles, but the ...


3

As @kilisi says, "it depends". I would add that it also depends on the type of job involved-- but not "Graeber jobs" [meaning BS jobs]. If you're marketing yourself in a field with an enormous volume of competition (eg enterprise java developer), yeah, linkedin is going to provide weak leads from disinterested recruiters casting a wide net to capture as ...


3

As an intern, especially part-time, hiring companies will understand that you didn't get to deliver finished products of your work into "production". They are expecting that you got good exposure and a chance to work with those technologies. You don't need to explicitly state that you didn't get to complete the projects. Just be accurate in your ...


3

TL:DR Roles for 'generalist' developers are rare. Businesses look for proven experience with specific technologies and stacks. Write different versions of your resume, one for each technology/language. Tweak the resume for the specific job to 'check all of the boxes'. Be prepared to focus on one language/technology in a new role. Consider applying to broad ...


3

The skills of being “a decent coder” on personal projects are very different from the skills of being a commercial or industrial programmer. Real-world programming usually involves working on existing codebases in a language that was already chosen, to fix bugs or add features. You don’t mention even one version control tool in your skills or one testing ...


3

Viewing profiles on LinkedIn is one way that interviewers, and interviewees, learn about each other as part of the interview process. My personal practice is to make a connection request to anyone at a potential employer who looks at my profile. What I don't do is run around looking for other people who work there. My rationale is they looked me over, and ...


3

also there will be great a risk to get a offer if I discloses it. Yes, you are right. The enlightened ones / larger corps may give you an offer, but otherwise be prepared to be skipped from offers on disclosing the details. I have a guilty feeling that, actually I am cheating them, as I will be going for a 6 month maternity leave Think: How would it ...


3

Normally I would advise emailing them at the address on the cards. But after seeing multiple spelling and other errors in such a short question it might be best to give them a ring and see if you can arrange a meeting.


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