758

I know they have no legal right to keep me there, but they've been trying to guilt me into staying for the last few days despite my insistence that I want to leave on the date I gave them. How do I deal with this and get them to accept my decision? Accepting your decision is their problem, not yours. What if the situation were reversed? If they decided ...


384

Tell them that you are relocating, there is no shame in this. No reasonable employer will form a negative opinion of you due to the fact that you are relocating to be with your husband. Any employer that has a problem with you prioritizing your family over your career is not a employer worth working for.


340

What could I have said to keep the interview going? Anything you would have said would have been a waste of your time at this point. Shrug it off and keep looking; you can't win them all. The manager had made it perfectly clear that A) he wasn't interested in hiring you and B) he wasn't very good at communicating.


295

A stunt like this would - in most environments - be a show-stopper from HR. The reason for this is very simple: You knew what you were doing, and it was none of your responsibilities to perform the test. If you happened to come across the issue in a "The shares showed up in the windows explorer" way it would probably have been ok. But a security ...


293

You realise most people here would kill for a one hour interview that resulted in a job offer the next day, right?! That's great! I'd figured there be some follow-up interviews where we can go more in depth of my coding abilities and system architects logic. IMHO, I'm glad more companies are actually moving away from this style of all-day really in-depth ...


254

I wouldn't say "I'm in love" directly. Best case is you get a sympathetic laugh, worst case it will come across as.. weird. What I would say instead is something like, "I'm excited about your company for reasons-here. Also I'd like to stay in my hometown to be closer to friends and family." This accomplishes your goal as well as coming across as positive, ...


247

Welcome to the real world. Sometimes you have to work with other people - while you may prefer to keep your CV in LaTeX or whatever else, that's not how the industry works. They want Word and the vast majority of candidates are happy to do that. Therefore you have a choice: give them a copy of your CV in Word, or don't work with that recruiter. Ask yourself ...


246

Call his bluff. It would be extremely petty and inappropriate to do that. I cannot imagine doing it. One's life would have to be pretty small to do so. Having said that, if he does call...so what? Just tell your boss you got approached by them but turned them down. At this point it's your word against their word, and you're the one staying at ...


238

But you are a pro. Always remember that. A recruiter at Bigcorp looked at you and went "you know, this is a pro I'd like to hire" Working a bazillion hours a week isn't what makes the people at Bigcorp pro, it is the ambition and innovation. The bazillion hours just burn people like you out. So present it like that, if they ask you to give a salary ...


222

My problem with his response is that I am offering him a job interview and he replies with 5 words. I don't think this is a big problem. Yes, a salutation would be better, yes, thanking you would be appropriate, but the standard With regards, <name> you see in most emails is an automated signature, so there isn't typically any sentiment behind it. ...


217

Imagine I invited you to my house for a backyard bar be que and you arrived and, while we were in the kitchen, said I stopped by yesterday while you were at work. That fence doesn't keep anyone out. I noticed that your swing set isn't properly anchored into the ground - that could be unsafe if larger children swing really hard. Also, the spacing on your ...


212

Job orders are often written up by people who have little to do with the actual job. Even when they are, they are often written up with an overly optimistic "Wish list" rather than actual requirements. It is safe to assume that, having read your linkedin profile, they know your qualifications and they are satisfied with them to at least bringing you in for ...


205

I'm in the same situation - my CV is in LaTeX and I produce a PDF file for my CV. When recruiters ask for a Word file, I tell them that I cannot do that, because I don't own a copy of Word, or a computer which will run Word. Assuming by "recruiters" you mean recruitment agencies: The companies that you are applying to don't care that your CV is PDF ...


197

How do I find a job that is as corporate as possible? Ideally it would be a large company that's very depersonalised, with private offices or at least sectioned off. No pressure to try to fit the culture. Work with a headhunter in an agency. Specify exactly what you want, and what you don't want. Expect to wait a while while the headhunter finds you a ...


193

When interviewing with a company where all the interviewers have lower educational backgrounds from lower ranking schools than the interviewee, Wait, hang on. While this is a common assumption that reputed schools produce good grades, it does not necessarily imply that the second or third-tier schools are of lower grade. Moreover, it's not only the formal ...


189

And would you consider it a kiss of death when said by a potential employer Yes. It translates into: "We're done considering you and the result was negative. No, we're not going to tell you exactly what was wrong. It might be your personality, what we think is your skill set, work ethic, communication skills, or whatever. We've had this conversation ...


187

I would say not a bad thing at all. If all the points you're concerned with are covered - namely your advancement as a professional (by way of new challenges) and monetary compensation for your work - and you're satisfied with it, then there is no reason for betting on a new environment. Unless, of course, an excellent (in comparison) proposal comes your ...


183

You do nothing. The process worked. You don't want to be underpaid. They don't want to pay you the going rate. What you got was an HR form letter. This is far from an offer of a job. This was just them doing due diligence before interviews. Everything worked. Mainly the problem with following up is that you seem desperate with this company and you ...


181

No, this is an unacceptable level of detail. No experienced (and self-respecting) developer would put up with this. And to be honest, no real recruiter would want this level of detail. It is just too much data to go through. You must push back, as you have been, with questions around implementation details, or even features, on projects that you worked on ...


180

Don't do this! This is a terrible idea - It's not the 1950s any more.. unless you're looking for retail or service industry roles unscheduled walk-ins are rude, disruptive and incredibly annoying. At best you're showing yourself as someone who is completely out of touch with professional norms or a bit weird and at worst you're just going to get binned off ...


179

Generally speaking, the overqualified employee is fundamentally less likely to be happy with their position. As a consequence: They will likely leave at the first opportunity. Generally speaking, if they take the job it's because they couldn't find anything better. This can lead to a certain resentment of their situation. From the company's point of ...


169

A good life lesson is, don't make assumptions. I'm saying this because your question is rife with them: You're assuming that you know the educational background of everyone at the table. You're assuming that educational background is an indicator of smartness. You're assuming that the person who appears the smartest doesn't get the job (your last sentence,...


164

Interviews serve two purposes, both very important. One is for the employer to assess whether you are a good person for the job. The other is for you to assess whether you want to work for the employer. A one-hour many-on-one interview isn't a great way for you to make your assessment, as you know. You can say to the hiring manager something like "Thanks ...


163

It's good reason to smile, but not much more. You shouldn't stop searching for a job until you've accepted a written offer with no contingencies. A lot can happen between now and when (if?) you get that offer. They might hire someone else, they might cancel the opening, etc.


162

In my experience, "pulling all nighters" isn't perceived as someone dedicated as one would hope. It's typically perceived as someone who has poor planning skills. I wouldn't mention all-nighters except in context of there being an unforeseen emergency that needed to be dealt with. Otherwise you'll likely have your ability to manage your time questioned. ...


160

This manager didn't want to hire you. We have no idea why that would be the case, but there is no reason to believe that it must be because your education. I would assume that this interviewer was older and more experienced than you, and had plenty of themes ready to reject you in a painful way. If the next interviewee comes along with plenty of practical ...


160

Resumes are sales tools. Look at other sales tools you're familiar with. Imagine you're at a conference, and a salesperson at a booth hands you a business card. You'd expect some level of formatting, in order to help convey a level of professionalism at least, if not some overall brand message for their company. What would you think of the salesperson if ...


155

You can ask indirectly. Simply say "I have a question about job X for skills Y that I saw posted on Z jobs board." If they say there is no job X, that they aren't looking for skills Y, or that they don't post jobs to Z, you'll have your answer. Just make sure you have an actual question about the job if it is real. :)


155

As a manager, if someone called me and said "hey, rooty, who works for you, got offered a job at my company but they turned it down!" I would certainly not hold it against rooty. If anything, I would want to congratulate rooty for making what seems like an obvious good decision to not go work for a company managed by inappropriate and awkward leaders. ...


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