385

Tell them that you are relocating, there is no shame in this. No reasonable employer will form a negative opinion of you due to the fact that you are relocating to be with your husband. Any employer that has a problem with you prioritizing your family over your career is not a employer worth working for.


238

But you are a pro. Always remember that. A recruiter at Bigcorp looked at you and went "you know, this is a pro I'd like to hire" Working a bazillion hours a week isn't what makes the people at Bigcorp pro, it is the ambition and innovation. The bazillion hours just burn people like you out. So present it like that, if they ask you to give a salary ...


113

It's OK to accept the documents but read the conditions of the visa very carefully before you move your life to Japan. You quite likely actually don't have a valid visa (and can't get one using the documentation prepared by the company), since being employed by the company sponsoring the visa is probably a condition for it to be valid.


95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


52

My husband recently got a new job that he really wanted, but the office is in a different city Nothing wrong in supporting a spouse/partner in a great opportunity. some of them said that potential employers might think that I value family way more than my career Good, your family and partner matter more than a job, you can make your career just as well ...


37

Would it be okay to just honestly answer that I like my job, but I have to relocate because of my husband's new job? Answering honestly is virtually always the correct course of action. Even more so in this case - the reason is perfectly reasonable. Many (including me) would say that relocating due to family is the best reason of all for finding a new ...


30

In a similar vein to Snow's answer, you're free to ask about how flexible their work policies are. It will likely come up in an interview, depending on the questions they ask, and you can seamlessly talk about your successes in that remote work environment without having to awkwardly bring it up out of context. However, since you are relatively ...


30

Unless you draw unusual particular attention to your online name, it isn't going to harm you. For example, don't show up at an interview with a t-shirt saying "I am Overlord Dragon". And don't use phrases like "we humans" during an interview. You won't appear "less controllable" solely due to your online name. You'll only appear that way if you act that ...


29

Engineering visas in Japan do not tie you to a single employer, at least not in practice; most of my several visa renewals were done under a different employer from the sponsor of the prevous visa and the immigration authorities had no problem with this. However, to get or renew a visa you must have a sponsor (scroll down a bit to "Employer") who will be ...


28

How should I balance expectations when applying to future jobs? I would position this as "the amount of hours required to accomplish what was expected was way more than I anticipated." Everyone typically understands when you are overworked, you are going to burn out, and eventually not meet expectations. At that point, you either quit and move on or are ...


24

You might consider negotiating your offer outside of the interview. Keep the interview to demonstrating your capabilities and asking questions that will help you decide if an opportunity with the company would be exciting. Instead of asking for remote work in an interview, express you desire for remote days to the recruiter. He or she can help you ...


21

Just another thought: do you absolutely have to find a new job? I used to work for a software company. One guy had to move to a different country for exactly the same reason as yours. And the company was happy to let him work from home in another country. This may depends on the nature of your work. But with today's technology, it's possible that your ...


20

My only question would be, is there an ethical way not to disclose my disability or disclose it in such a way that it doesn't make the second party afraid of hiring me? In short, I would not disclose the information until you have to. Let the company get to know you first. Your best bet IMO is for them to actually meet you face to face first -- ...


19

The first step is understanding what actually happened. Because there is a difference between "I had to put in a lot of hours because I wasn't ask skilled as expected" and "I had to put in a lot of hours because the workplace expected it due to being Big Four." This may require a lot of self-examination which you might not be up to doing, but it will help ...


18

Thank you for CV, but we just employed new colleague. This most likely means your resume was received, but they have already filled the position.


17

You're not an employee, you're an intern. Company B can't be accused of "taking employees" if you're not an employee. Do what you feel is best for you and what feels the most "right" to you. If there's any animosity, it has nothing to do with you. Don't let the actions, words, feelings of others dictate your career path. The only thing you need be concerned ...


14

Yes. It's okay. Take it. The position was uncertain. So the company took a risk and applied on your behalf anyway. It didn't work out for them, not this time anyway. But the visa exists now, and I guess they thought you'd like to have it regardless. So thank them and take the visa documents.


14

I tend to add 'References available on request' at the end of my CV. That gives the notion that you will let them talk to somebody if the interview process goes far enough. I think though it also hints you would rather they didn't just go and contact anyone off their own back.


9

So far, existing answers have focused on the discrimination angle--which is correct and important. However, because you are applying for overseas jobs which will require a work permit or immigration visa, I have a different take on the answer. The Netherlands and New Zealand companies were rude, no question about it. They probably were discriminating ...


9

Regarding (1): As someone who's been involved in reviewing, interviewing and hiring applicants in IT (developers): If you put this information forward and make sure I know it's important to you, finding "Antitheist Gnostic Atheist" at the top of your Twitter feed and seeing questions like this on SE will certainly make me wonder about both your perspective ...


7

I'm not an expert in Japanese culture or business dealings. But in many cultures, it's common practice to offer something with the expectation that it will be rejected or politely declined. It can be as simple as a gesture of goodwill or even something of value. Strongly suggest you seek advice from someone you trust who is knowledgeable of Japanese customs ...


7

Has it sense to write cover letters? Yes, but as I see it, CV's are more relevant for the application process compared to Cover Letters. Both are important, but CV's are more. In my experience, there are cases where Cover Letters are not required nor asked (some even don't have a place where to put your cover letter), but CV's are always asked or required. ...


6

You can go with something like: Dear Sir/Madam, I sincerely appreciate the interest you have shown in my profile. Unfortunatelly, I am currently commited to other projects and it is not possible for me to quit them right now. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with me again in the future if you are still interested in offering me a similar opportunity. ...


6

You could maybe name-drop it casually. "I'm sending you this letter as a response to my brief correspondence with X" or something of the sorts. I wouldn't make to big of a deal out of it.


6

An internship is a learning opportunity. It helps you a) pick important skills that you can use in your early career b) have something to talk of during your initial interviews Other students are right, they've experienced a different way of working than what is taught at the university, and so they've picked up "industry skills". However, you too have ...


6

It's important to place some context around your question. It sounds like you're still in school and are considering your first job after school. Employers look at fresh grads slightly differently than experienced staff, and in general, school-related attributes become less and less important as you gain more years of working experience. As a hiring manager, ...


5

Be honest: You want an employer who is understanding of you having family. Also, this can be seen as upside: You're loyal and dependable. Be prepared to convince the potential employer that your husband will stay in this city, which in turn makes you stay, which then increases the chances that you stay with the company for a long long time.


5

Your concerns seem valid. Yes, it's generally difficult to get hired remotely as a novice. There's not much that can be said there except to try and push your luck; and get experience and certification wherever you can. If you consider it undesirable to work in that particular domain in your country, work in a different but related domain, or study in that ...


4

You could ask us, a bunch of random strangers on the internet; But unless we have been in your position or recruiting for industries where you might apply, you will get better advice by asking a professional recruiter or two. Send your CV and schedule a call. It will cost you nothing and you will gain valuable insights. Good luck, and please come back ...


4

Firstly you have my sympathies - it sounds like you were in a toxic situation and I know how soul-destroying that can be. So I absolutely understand why you wanted out ASAP but don't tip-toe around this by trying to claim you "quit", you didn't you were fired and with cause. As you say this was some time ago so you've had time to reflect on this and I'm ...


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