388

Tell them that you are relocating, there is no shame in this. No reasonable employer will form a negative opinion of you due to the fact that you are relocating to be with your husband. Any employer that has a problem with you prioritizing your family over your career is not a employer worth working for.


250

You can push back via the recruiter, sure. The recruiter may or may not pass on your feedback, and it may or may not result in a different outcome. Your feedback should be pretty polite though - so lose that "junior developer graded it" stuff, and explain in detail your answer to the SQL queries you mention. You might want to ignore the nit-picky stuff ...


239

But you are a pro. Always remember that. A recruiter at Bigcorp looked at you and went "you know, this is a pro I'd like to hire" Working a bazillion hours a week isn't what makes the people at Bigcorp pro, it is the ambition and innovation. The bazillion hours just burn people like you out. So present it like that, if they ask you to give a salary ...


207

I'm guessing they're mixing me up with somebody else. That certainly seems to be the case, unless you've been sitting on board of a charity without knowing about it. Is there any reason that I shouldn't take this job? Yes, the job offer is not for you, that's the solid reason why not to do it. It's not like I'm committing fraud or anything (it's the ...


172

I am sorry for the loss of your boyfriend. Regarding your job issue, there is no need for over-complication. Just contact them and tell them what you told us. Normal English language should do it. Explain how the situation is now different compared to the situation some time ago, when you discussed the last time. Let them know that you are now ready to ...


148

Ignore them... These emails aren't actually being sent out by humans, but automated systems that crunch your resume looking for keywords. The recruiters don't expect to hear back from you unless you are a match. The emails are generated by stringing the keywords on your resume, and inserting them on a form email. Then, the recruiter sits back and waits. ...


138

What’s the downside of applying again? If you apply and get declined, the end result is you wouldn’t work there. If you don’t apply, you also would end up not working there.


126

They had me sign a very specific NDA where I could not state location, details of diet, heath, salary...not even disclose WHOM I WAS WORKING FOR. That's not as outrageous as you seem to be making it, I can't imagine that anyone hiring a personal chef would want that person to go on and put on their resume: "I worked for XYZ FAMOUS PERSON and had to ...


125

I suggest you take this as a learning experience and not beg for a re-take. What technologies they have listed on the job posting are things they could potentially ask about in the test. You should have prepared in advance. I highly doubt this opportunity is going to go anywhere even if you do re-take the test as first impressions are usually key.


121

Have him send a letter saying that, upon acceptance of any offer proffered, he is officially out of any other processes. Turn the tables on them and see what happens. They're trying to put themselves in the position that your brother has to take what they offer. Put it right back on them.


113

It's OK to accept the documents but read the conditions of the visa very carefully before you move your life to Japan. You quite likely actually don't have a valid visa (and can't get one using the documentation prepared by the company), since being employed by the company sponsoring the visa is probably a condition for it to be valid.


103

NO, you should not mention this to the interviewer Two points: The recruiter does not have anything to do with the knowledge about how you want to make a decision (negotiation in current organization or not), they don't need to know that. Just because an organization offered you the expected salary does not mean you are bound to accept the offer, there are ...


100

Unless the issue is being followed up on by the police, the matter is closed. Fast food is entry level work and presumably you are seeking to obtain similar work, so just leave the job off your resume and apply to other places. You may want to change your username for this question, as I Googled the name you have and can match certain identifying ...


90

The points you're trying to make aren't inherently bad, but in these situations, framing is everything. I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple This sounds a bit like you're waving away any point of doing a postdoc if you don't plan on an academic career ("not planning to go into academia, so there's no point!") Instead, ...


89

People who make sloppy assumptions have only themselves to blame Putting "dropped out" or "incomplete" beside your education would be like putting "terminated" beside past jobs where your contract was not renewed or you got fired. Nobody would advise doing that. Employers would love to know if you have a criminal record, but nobody would advise putting "...


87

This is one of those cases where you need to view the entire interview as a 2-way street. You're interviewing them just as much as they're interviewing you. If you'd really like to work here, then it may be worth your while to draft a response to the recruiter and interviewer indicating why you gave the answers you did and (gently) indicate why you ...


84

You asked, Is this normal practice or should we see something fishy here? That's an easy question: You should see something fishy here. The recruiter is clearly trying to trap your brother. If he actually does back out of all other hiring processes, he will have zero options. The recruiter's offer will be his only choice. He will be more likely to ...


80

You said, I don't know what to do here The best thing to do is probably to move on. Focus your mental and emotional energy on other opportunities. Either: The employer is right - the test is not impossible, and you just screwed it up. But if that's the case, following up won't really get you anywhere, because they've clearly passed you over at this ...


75

Can I get a "Hell no!" ? Using other solid offers as negotiation capital isn't bad in of itself - and while the individual(s) your interviewing may well understand what you're doing and may well even have done the same themselves in similar situations you aren't just interacting with them as individuals but as representatives of the interviewing company. ...


73

What should I do? Learn a lesson, hope company A does not initiate legal action against you, and move on. Can I file complaint against him or his organization? Forget you ever thought of this; you are the one at fault here. To elaborate, unless company B used physical means to snatch that letter out of you (which constitutes a criminal case against them), ...


66

No. The point of such tests is to determine if you know the subject matter well and therefore would make a good candidate for the job. "Cramming" to pass the test is nearly as bad as not passing the test - they're not looking for "I managed to pass the test" they are looking for a knowledgeable professional. There's limited ways to do that other than ...


60

I'm wondering should I even bother? Do HRs have some sort of employee blacklist? It's unlikely that you are on a blacklist, but certainly both HR and the hiring manager will know that a year ago you left your 2-month stint. Just be sure to have an excellent answer to the inevitable question of "why did you leave us before?" Make sure your answer is clear,...


58

My answer was, "I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple. Also, the uncertainty in funding for postdocs did not appeal to me." No need to feel ashamed about it. The above answer is a perfectly good and valid response. Judging by your question the only thing you need to consider worrying about is the intonation. Basically, don't ...


52

I had multiple DUIs that happened 12 years ago all within the same time period. I am going to an interview where the job requires a background check. It is for an estate attorney's office. Even if I'm not asked, do I disclose this information during the interview, being that it will probably be the only chance I have to defend my past? Since ...


51

My husband recently got a new job that he really wanted, but the office is in a different city Nothing wrong in supporting a spouse/partner in a great opportunity. some of them said that potential employers might think that I value family way more than my career Good, your family and partner matter more than a job, you can make your career just as well ...


49

Open a question on Stack Overflow. You might get some kind of surprise answer and then you'll feel dumb and move on. You might get a million veterans on your side telling you that you were correct and then you can just say "well, screw that company then" and move on. Be sure to give as many details as you can. Some sort of web-portal mechanism processed ...


49

Here's a no fuss straight forward approach: Hello, I saw the role regarding [job title], and am interested as it's in my area of expertise. I find that the duties of this role differ between companies, so can you give me more details on its scope? Thanks, Riku


48

The answer is YES and I will answer it from the recruiters side. You don't have a phone NUMBER. Recruiters don't care if you answer the call on latest Pear XII with Swarovski crystals or a 10 year old Nokia. Additional edit: I also have no idea if you answer, when I call your NUMBER, with a smart fridge, laptop or tablet. You can have an internet ...


48

Being transparent and straightforward is all you need to do here. This goes for virtually every situation where your circumstances have changed and you're reconsidering a past decision. The key element is to explain why you've reconsidered. In the case of pursuing a rejected job offer, that means: acknowledging the reasons you rejected the offer ...


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