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289

You realise most people here would kill for a one hour interview that resulted in a job offer the next day, right?! That's great! I'd figured there be some follow-up interviews where we can go more in depth of my coding abilities and system architects logic. IMHO, I'm glad more companies are actually moving away from this style of all-day really in-depth ...


212

Job orders are often written up by people who have little to do with the actual job. Even when they are, they are often written up with an overly optimistic "Wish list" rather than actual requirements. It is safe to assume that, having read your linkedin profile, they know your qualifications and they are satisfied with them to at least bringing you in for ...


193

When interviewing with a company where all the interviewers have lower educational backgrounds from lower ranking schools than the interviewee, Wait, hang on. While this is a common assumption that reputed schools produce good grades, it does not necessarily imply that the second or third-tier schools are of lower grade. Moreover, it's not only the formal ...


189

And would you consider it a kiss of death when said by a potential employer Yes. It translates into: "We're done considering you and the result was negative. No, we're not going to tell you exactly what was wrong. It might be your personality, what we think is your skill set, work ethic, communication skills, or whatever. We've had this conversation ...


178

No, this is an unacceptable level of detail. No experienced (and self-respecting) developer would put up with this. And to be honest, no real recruiter would want this level of detail. It is just too much data to go through. You must push back, as you have been, with questions around implementation details, or even features, on projects that you worked on ...


169

A good life lesson is, don't make assumptions. I'm saying this because your question is rife with them: You're assuming that you know the educational background of everyone at the table. You're assuming that educational background is an indicator of smartness. You're assuming that the person who appears the smartest doesn't get the job (your last sentence,...


162

Interviews serve two purposes, both very important. One is for the employer to assess whether you are a good person for the job. The other is for you to assess whether you want to work for the employer. A one-hour many-on-one interview isn't a great way for you to make your assessment, as you know. You can say to the hiring manager something like "Thanks ...


160

Resumes are sales tools. Look at other sales tools you're familiar with. Imagine you're at a conference, and a salesperson at a booth hands you a business card. You'd expect some level of formatting, in order to help convey a level of professionalism at least, if not some overall brand message for their company. What would you think of the salesperson if ...


155

You can ask indirectly. Simply say "I have a question about job X for skills Y that I saw posted on Z jobs board." If they say there is no job X, that they aren't looking for skills Y, or that they don't post jobs to Z, you'll have your answer. Just make sure you have an actual question about the job if it is real. :)


146

Well, you can certainly ask for the reason behind rejection, however whether you are going to get a response or not, depends. Sadly, many cases, after having a negative result, recruiters choose to cease communication. Very few number of cases actually end up providing a reason or feedback. To be clear, this has nothing to do with the nature of the work (...


138

Entering into a working relationship is an act of mutual trust. An interview builds upon information in a CV, but it does not replace it. If you are about to enter into a working relationship based on a mixed up CV, you have one option: Come clean. All cards on table. And if you are at all in doubt about this, you've failed to view the situation from their ...


118

Today in a call a recruiter mentioned that I might want to consider finding something fast because having this few months out of employment "raises some questions" No it does not. A "gap" only raises questions if it's a gap. If you worked from 2011-2016 and 2018-2019 and refuse to tell me what you did in between, that is a gap. It probably means a prison ...


117

I'd say highly unlikely. You wrote: she will just rot on the couch for the rest of her life if left to her own devices. That clearly shows she does not want to get a job. Job application says she wants to get a job. Thus, any application would be a lie on that single most important point. If you apply for her, you will be lying and wasting resources of ...


115

There's absolutely nothing wrong with you attending with your friends. You can support and encourage them as well as point out interesting companies that are participating in the career fair. What would be questionable would be if you actively approached the recruiters. If a recruiter should happen to approach or question you simply tell them you are ...


109

Whatever you end up doing, please remember two things: ideas/big pictures are valueless without skill and experience, and skills and experience is valuable even without ideas/big picture. I strongly suggest you decide to gain more skill and experience before you focus on any end goals. Possibly in the process you will see a clearer direction for yourself.


108

I know they are going to confirm degree with previous employer as I am a recent graduate, and they will know that I lied. Why would they do that? I'm uncertain why they would call your employer rather than the university/college? Plus why would they check your grades or gpa? I never heard of that before. Typically the background process will check the ...


106

I don't see how it's a good idea in my honest opinion. When you sign a contract, you have a two month trial period (at least where I'm from), and the purpose of it is exactly what you mentioned. During that time, the company can evaluate your abilities and you can evaluate if you want to stay in the company. If you try to negotiate for a lower salary, ...


105

I personally would place a phone call or email to let them know that something came up that you weren't able to make it, and that you had decided to stay where you are rather than seek a new position. Thank them for the time, apologize for not being there when you said you would.


100

You've already identified a good way to do that: Ask who the person of contact is. If the posting is fake they'll tell you as much, and if not, you avoid offending them by asking.


94

Ask open questions! Often the employer has little clue about the meat and veg of a vacancy and their job is not to make you happy, the job is to sell a position. They are a car salesman and to these guys nothing is impossible, the car can do anything you like and that crack in the windshield is "just cosmetic, will buff right out". So don't give them a ...


94

Is this recruiter/manager trying to steal the fruits of my labor or am I just paranoid? None, this looks like a scam. Under no circumstances, you are supposed to give away the exact minute details of the working project for your current employer, let alone the source code and/or documentation. That would be a serious violation of the contract in most of ...


91

Do you think that this is a reasonable thing for an employer to ask It's fair to believe they take advantage of candidates, or are extremely unprofessional. It is not reasonable to give a time-consuming assignment (presumably a week long) to start with, but is quite over the top to be delaying an answer for 3 weeks and being suggested to work more. Do you ...


83

Short Answer: If you have budget and requirement for an internship, then that is on offer. This person can choose to take that or not. If the role you have available is for an intern, then that is what you are offering. The person is applying for an internship as this is a requirement for their course. In the end, you have a role you are offering, and ...


82

It would be understandable to say no, because it's unlikely anyone would put in the effort to verify you were fired over 20 years ago from a non-existent company, especially if that job is not in your resume. The problem with saying "no" is that it is not the truth. And not telling the truth seems to bother you, which is not an uncommon response. This is a ...


78

You basically nailed it on the head. Your situation is "hopeless" without being willing to do the work necessary to transform abstract ideas in to material actions. According to your post you have: No relevant education or qualifications No money No talent (other than big ideas) No skills or experience So, your value proposition is: Has ideas, sort of. ...


70

You should disclose the fact you've learned of the opportunity from the recruiter (at least at some point of the process, be it formally or informally within an interview) and explain why you didn't pursue the opportunity through them further. Then, they get to decide for themselves what their obligations towards said recruiter are. I imagine they would ...


67

Assuming this is the US and you did not falsify the information you provided, worst they can practically do is to fire you for incompetence if you lack the skills required. Chances are if you put embedded programming on your resume and they saw that, with a position possibly matching it they have likely been trying to fill for some time, they tried to see if ...


65

Yes, talk to your manager/contact about this. Lead with the positive about what you have achieved and learnt so far and show that you understand the platform enough to work on this. And then lead into your problem by describing your reasoning for going down that route. Describe the issue and then ask for how you should continue this. Admit to yourself ...


59

Adding a slightly different perspective: Fit is NOT an empty phrase but the single most important part of the hiring decision. The job of the interview team is to figure out whether the candidate is a "good fit" for the role. "Fit" breaks down into a bunch of different components Technical skills, stuff for the immediate role, adjacent and orthogonal skills....


58

What you do at your first position after graduation doesn't mean you're "stuck" doing that and doing something that is related to what you want (even if only tenuously) is way, way better than doing something completely unrelated like a factory job. SAP might not be where you want to mainly focus your career but it's still a valuable skill to have on the CV ...


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