Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
389

Tell them that you are relocating, there is no shame in this. No reasonable employer will form a negative opinion of you due to the fact that you are relocating to be with your husband. Any employer that has a problem with you prioritizing your family over your career is not a employer worth working for.


291

You realise most people here would kill for a one hour interview that resulted in a job offer the next day, right?! That's great! I'd figured there be some follow-up interviews where we can go more in depth of my coding abilities and system architects logic. IMHO, I'm glad more companies are actually moving away from this style of all-day really in-depth ...


246

Call his bluff. It would be extremely petty and inappropriate to do that. I cannot imagine doing it. One's life would have to be pretty small to do so. Having said that, if he does call...so what? Just tell your boss you got approached by them but turned them down. At this point it's your word against their word, and you're the one staying at ...


239

But you are a pro. Always remember that. A recruiter at Bigcorp looked at you and went "you know, this is a pro I'd like to hire" Working a bazillion hours a week isn't what makes the people at Bigcorp pro, it is the ambition and innovation. The bazillion hours just burn people like you out. So present it like that, if they ask you to give a salary ...


193

When interviewing with a company where all the interviewers have lower educational backgrounds from lower ranking schools than the interviewee, Wait, hang on. While this is a common assumption that reputed schools produce good grades, it does not necessarily imply that the second or third-tier schools are of lower grade. Moreover, it's not only the formal ...


189

And would you consider it a kiss of death when said by a potential employer Yes. It translates into: "We're done considering you and the result was negative. No, we're not going to tell you exactly what was wrong. It might be your personality, what we think is your skill set, work ethic, communication skills, or whatever. We've had this conversation ...


180

No, this is an unacceptable level of detail. No experienced (and self-respecting) developer would put up with this. And to be honest, no real recruiter would want this level of detail. It is just too much data to go through. You must push back, as you have been, with questions around implementation details, or even features, on projects that you worked on ...


168

A good life lesson is, don't make assumptions. I'm saying this because your question is rife with them: You're assuming that you know the educational background of everyone at the table. You're assuming that educational background is an indicator of smartness. You're assuming that the person who appears the smartest doesn't get the job (your last sentence,...


164

Interviews serve two purposes, both very important. One is for the employer to assess whether you are a good person for the job. The other is for you to assess whether you want to work for the employer. A one-hour many-on-one interview isn't a great way for you to make your assessment, as you know. You can say to the hiring manager something like "Thanks ...


160

Resumes are sales tools. Look at other sales tools you're familiar with. Imagine you're at a conference, and a salesperson at a booth hands you a business card. You'd expect some level of formatting, in order to help convey a level of professionalism at least, if not some overall brand message for their company. What would you think of the salesperson if ...


156

You can ask indirectly. Simply say "I have a question about job X for skills Y that I saw posted on Z jobs board." If they say there is no job X, that they aren't looking for skills Y, or that they don't post jobs to Z, you'll have your answer. Just make sure you have an actual question about the job if it is real. :)


155

As a manager, if someone called me and said "hey, rooty, who works for you, got offered a job at my company but they turned it down!" I would certainly not hold it against rooty. If anything, I would want to congratulate rooty for making what seems like an obvious good decision to not go work for a company managed by inappropriate and awkward leaders. ...


145

Well, you can certainly ask for the reason behind rejection, however whether you are going to get a response or not, depends. Sadly, many cases, after having a negative result, recruiters choose to cease communication. Very few number of cases actually end up providing a reason or feedback. To be clear, this has nothing to do with the nature of the work (...


138

Entering into a working relationship is an act of mutual trust. An interview builds upon information in a CV, but it does not replace it. If you are about to enter into a working relationship based on a mixed up CV, you have one option: Come clean. All cards on table. And if you are at all in doubt about this, you've failed to view the situation from their ...


119

There's absolutely nothing wrong with you attending with your friends. You can support and encourage them as well as point out interesting companies that are participating in the career fair. What would be questionable would be if you actively approached the recruiters. If a recruiter should happen to approach or question you simply tell them you are ...


118

Today in a call a recruiter mentioned that I might want to consider finding something fast because having this few months out of employment "raises some questions" No it does not. A "gap" only raises questions if it's a gap. If you worked from 2011-2016 and 2018-2019 and refuse to tell me what you did in between, that is a gap. It probably means a prison ...


117

I'd say highly unlikely. You wrote: she will just rot on the couch for the rest of her life if left to her own devices. That clearly shows she does not want to get a job. Job application says she wants to get a job. Thus, any application would be a lie on that single most important point. If you apply for her, you will be lying and wasting resources of ...


114

It's OK to accept the documents but read the conditions of the visa very carefully before you move your life to Japan. You quite likely actually don't have a valid visa (and can't get one using the documentation prepared by the company), since being employed by the company sponsoring the visa is probably a condition for it to be valid.


109

Whatever you end up doing, please remember two things: ideas/big pictures are valueless without skill and experience, and skills and experience is valuable even without ideas/big picture. I strongly suggest you decide to gain more skill and experience before you focus on any end goals. Possibly in the process you will see a clearer direction for yourself.


108

I know they are going to confirm degree with previous employer as I am a recent graduate, and they will know that I lied. Why would they do that? I'm uncertain why they would call your employer rather than the university/college? Plus why would they check your grades or gpa? I never heard of that before. Typically the background process will check the ...


106

I don't see how it's a good idea in my honest opinion. When you sign a contract, you have a two month trial period (at least where I'm from), and the purpose of it is exactly what you mentioned. During that time, the company can evaluate your abilities and you can evaluate if you want to stay in the company. If you try to negotiate for a lower salary, ...


105

I personally would place a phone call or email to let them know that something came up that you weren't able to make it, and that you had decided to stay where you are rather than seek a new position. Thank them for the time, apologize for not being there when you said you would.


102

On your resume, and when asked, you should never provide any of this detail. Your resume should focus on the good things you accomplished there. When asked why you are leaving, tread carefully. No-one will listen to the entire story, which sounds hard to believe, just because of the sheer length. Yet a very short answer like "it was a toxic environment" ...


100

You've already identified a good way to do that: Ask who the person of contact is. If the posting is fake they'll tell you as much, and if not, you avoid offending them by asking.


96

A friend once relayed a story of threats that resulted in him simply replying, “If that’s what you think you should do, then that’s what you should do.” I believe it applies here as well. It tends to make the other party realize his actions are not terribly concerning to you. I’d focus more on your view of the work environment and your relationship with ...


95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


94

Is this recruiter/manager trying to steal the fruits of my labor or am I just paranoid? None, this looks like a scam. Under no circumstances, you are supposed to give away the exact minute details of the working project for your current employer, let alone the source code and/or documentation. That would be a serious violation of the contract in most of ...


91

Do you think that this is a reasonable thing for an employer to ask It's fair to believe they take advantage of candidates, or are extremely unprofessional. It is not reasonable to give a time-consuming assignment (presumably a week long) to start with, but is quite over the top to be delaying an answer for 3 weeks and being suggested to work more. Do you ...


90

The points you're trying to make aren't inherently bad, but in these situations, framing is everything. I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple This sounds a bit like you're waving away any point of doing a postdoc if you don't plan on an academic career ("not planning to go into academia, so there's no point!") Instead, ...


83

Short Answer: If you have budget and requirement for an internship, then that is on offer. This person can choose to take that or not. If the role you have available is for an intern, then that is what you are offering. The person is applying for an internship as this is a requirement for their course. In the end, you have a role you are offering, and ...


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